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Heating an indoor pool room

rachelswimrachelswim Member, Email Confirmation Posts: 2
edited October 6 in THE MAIN WALL
I am a swim instructor in rural southern IL. I am putting an above ground pool inside. I was told that the chlorine and salt water systems are very corrosive to the heaters and dehumidifiers. My question is what if I use a copper ionization system. Specific the Ecosmarte system. They have told me it’s not corrosive and I won’t need a special heater or dehumidifier. People around my area are just not familiar with this! Trust me I have called around! Thanks for your help

Comments

  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Member Posts: 13,412
    I'm not familiar with it, but the literature looks very attractive. The literature does put chlorination in an entirely negative light -- which is hardly fair; it's not so much what they do say as what they don't. Which, frankly, makes me quite wary of the rest of their claims.

    If, however, you are planning to use this pool for lessons outside your own family, you must -- absolutely must -- get your local public health authority to sign off on it. You may find that they have a requirement for a minimum level of residual disinfection in the water at all times, and I don't see a reference to that in the product literature (this is why ozonization or UV is not an option for public pools, by the way, even though it they are wonderful disinfectants). You may be able to get the manufacturer of the system to assist you with this.
    Br. Jamie, osb

    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.

    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • ZmanZman Member Posts: 6,002
    Natatoriums (fancy name for indoor pool) with eat your building if it is not properly designed. I don't believe it matters how the pool water is treated. I have seen more than one building structure turn into a pile of rotten wood due to improper design or maintenance

    Positive building pressure and inadequate ventilation are the most common issues.

    If you want the nerdy explanation, give this a read http://www.b2ce.com/uploads/3/4/2/9/3429384/natatorium_considerations.b2ce_inc.pdf

    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
  • rachelswimrachelswim Member, Email Confirmation Posts: 2
    Zman, I have been told this and will spend their money on the proper dehumidifier I am just trying to figure out if I can just get a heater or if I still need one that is “special”! I have been quoted between $25k-$30k! The building isn’t that big and I have sectioned off a smaller area just for the pool so that’s the only space that needs to be maintained so high.
  • mattmia2mattmia2 Member Posts: 1,872
    I think even without chlorine or sodium added you will still have nascent oxygen in the air from the disinfection that may be less aggressive but will still attack metals and plastics.
  • hot_rodhot_rod Member Posts: 13,838
    If the pool is heated and uncovered , generally that will heat the space, but you do need to remove the ,moisture and it will take some heat along with it.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    The magic is in hydronics, and hydronics is in me
  • EBEBRATT-EdEBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 7,315
    The indoor pool I worked on has a heat pump which heated the pool water and at the same time dehumidified the pool room air. I don't recall the name of the unit right now
  • EdTheHeaterManEdTheHeaterMan Member Posts: 802
    Either you're closing your eyes to a situation you do not wish to acknowledge, or you are unaware of the caliber of disaster indicated by the presents of a pool room in your home!
    Oh, you got trouble... Right here in River City!....


    Sorry for the interruption... I could not help it.
    Zman
  • EBEBRATT-EdEBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 7,315
    It took me 24 hours to remember but "Dry-o-tron" was the name I was thinking about
  • ratioratio Member Posts: 2,563
    Seresco, Desert Aire, & a few others are big around here—cheap they're not, but they work real hard to keep the humidity from damaging the structure.
  • ZmanZman Member Posts: 6,002
    edited October 13

    Either you're closing your eyes to a situation you do not wish to acknowledge, or you are unaware of the caliber of disaster indicated by the presents of a pool room in your home!
    Oh, you got trouble... Right here in River City!....


    Sorry for the interruption... I could not help it.

    Blazing Saddles of course...
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
    EdTheHeaterMan
  • pecmsgpecmsg Member Posts: 1,509
    You need to tightly control temperature and humidity and maintain negative pressure to the surrounding building.

    There's a reason Indoor Pool equipment costs 3 or 4 times as much.
  • TAGTAG Member Posts: 278
    My neighbors have an indoor pool -- they don't use CL. It's a salt pool ..... it's really it's own little building.

    Spray foam .. tile and drywall. The key is not overheating the pool. They also have to vent the space occasionally depending on the outside temp and humidity vs using a dehumidifier.
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