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Sharkbite fittings' max temp vs. possible boiler temperatures?

MrCofDGMrCofDG Member Posts: 21
I've come across an apparent contradiction..... background: I'm considering using oxygen-barrier PEX in an enhancement to my copper hydronic piping. My boiler manual recommends a temp setting of 200 degrees for baseboards and convectors. (I'm not running that high now). BUT www.sharkbite.com/products/brass-push-coupling says the fittings are only rated for 200 degrees F. Hmmm. That seems to imply that brass SharkBite fittings would be risky to use...... comments/experience ?

Comments

  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Member Posts: 12,725
    If the manufacturer rates the fitting for 200 and you never go over that, shouldn't be a problem.
    Br. Jamie, osb

    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.

    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • ZmanZman Member Posts: 5,753
    I would be very surprised if your system requires 200 degrees. Most hot water systems run great at 170-180. You would have to perform a heat loss of the building and compare that to available radiation to be sure.

    Sharkbites are generally not the right product for boiler piping.
    A future home inspector would red flag a system cobbled together with shark bites.
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
    kcoppmattmia2
  • Long Beach EdLong Beach Ed Member Posts: 700
    In some jurisdictions those things aren't permitted anywhere.
  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Member Posts: 12,725
    I didn't say I'd use them -- I wouldn't -- but only that he's within the manufacturer's spec.
    Br. Jamie, osb

    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.

    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • Larry WeingartenLarry Weingarten Member Posts: 1,786
    Yup, I've seen a leaky one cause roughly 10K in damage. To me they have use as a temporary repair fitting as long as it's not in a concealed space. :#

    Yours, Larry
  • Paul PolletsPaul Pollets Member Posts: 3,287
    Shark Bites are repair fittings, not for assembly of Near-Boiler piping. Those fittings should be soldered, pressed or screwed.
    ZmanIronmankcoppmattmia2
  • hot_rodhot_rod Member Posts: 13,218
    If you think about it both copper press fitting and SharkBite or any grip fitting depend on the O ring for the seal.

    The grip fitting depends on the serrated ring to keep things together, the press fitting depends on the crimp or compression of the copper.

    In either case all that keeps the fluid in is a small o-ring seal.

    I've seen plenty of green fuzzy press/ glycol connections, there must be some limit to o-ring seals :)

    There is no substitute for a properly solar copper joint, in my experience.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    The magic is in hydronics, and hydronics is in me
    rick in Alaskamattmia2
  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Member Posts: 12,725
    "There is no substitute for a properly solid copper joint, in my experience"

    And trust me. If even I can do them, anybody can! (with a little practice...)
    Br. Jamie, osb

    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.

    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • MrCofDGMrCofDG Member Posts: 21
    Ok, I'm gonna back away from Sharkbite. Thanks gents.
  • Jolly BodgerJolly Bodger Member Posts: 209
    @Jamie Hall , I'm having trouble soldering my PEX fittings. Can you give me some pointers? ;)
  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Member Posts: 12,725
    Can't honestly say I've ever tried to solder a copper to PEX fitting. I use a special electric soldering clamp for all the soldering I do, since I work in old to very old structures where using a torch just isn't a good thing.
    Br. Jamie, osb

    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.

    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • Jolly BodgerJolly Bodger Member Posts: 209
    What make model? I've looked at electric soldering a couple times for the same reasons
  • Jolly BodgerJolly Bodger Member Posts: 209
    So now that push fittings have been thrown out, what is best? Crimp or expansion?
  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Member Posts: 12,725
    Br. Jamie, osb

    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.

    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • Larry WeingartenLarry Weingarten Member Posts: 1,786
    Hi @Jolly Bodger , Try holding a crimp fitting next to an expansion fitting. Look at the ID of the fittings and I imagine you’ll see the expansion is substantially bigger. That’s less flow restriction, so is what I prefer ;)

    Yours, Larry
    Canucker
  • mattmia2mattmia2 Member Posts: 1,205
    unless you really do something wrong the expansion fitting inherently makes an even grip on the fitting. you have to be careful how you put a crimp ring on and that the tooling is well made and in good condition to get a mostly even grip. the expansion fitting has a better chance of shrinking back down to its original configuration if it freezes as well, freezing could tend to push a crimp ring off or cut the tubing on the crimp ring.
  • MrCofDGMrCofDG Member Posts: 21
    Ok, I'm getting a little confused re terminology.... Above, Paul Pollets states that near-boiler fittings "should be soldered, pressed or screwed". Is an "expansion fitting" yet another kind of fitting ?? Or is "expansion fitting" synonymous with a fitting that is 'pressed' ?
  • Jolly BodgerJolly Bodger Member Posts: 209
    There are two, actually three types of fitting for PEX pipe. Expansion is a collar that goes on the pipe then is expanded and shrinks back onto the fitting. Crimp rings go voer the pipe then are crimped down onto the fitting. and Push (sharkbite) but that one has already bee defunked.

    Soldered = copper pipe fittings.
    screwed= threaded fittings.
    pressed= copper fittings with an O-ring seal that get pressed on the pipe = sharkbite that needs a special tool.
  • Jolly BodgerJolly Bodger Member Posts: 209
    I've seen someone try to use press fittings on a steam generator. didn't last long. Only brazing held up in the long run.
  • hot_rodhot_rod Member Posts: 13,218

    There are two, actually three types of fitting for PEX pipe. Expansion is a collar that goes on the pipe then is expanded and shrinks back onto the fitting. Crimp rings go voer the pipe then are crimped down onto the fitting. and Push (sharkbite) but that one has already bee defunked.

    Soldered = copper pipe fittings.
    screwed= threaded fittings.
    pressed= copper fittings with an O-ring seal that get pressed on the pipe = sharkbite that needs a special tool.

    Plus the REHAU fitting F2080 which expands the pex then pulls a collar over the barb. No need to wait or be concerned about the shrinking of the collar. Possibly the best fitting in cold weather installations.

    There are also pex compression fittings, very common in Europe on panel rads for example.

    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    The magic is in hydronics, and hydronics is in me
    Zman
  • Leon82Leon82 Member Posts: 655
    By the time you pay for the shark bites you could probably have used copper for similar price
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