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Home owner wants to say thanks. Some pics of new install

invermontinvermont Member Posts: 66
There are a bunch of guys here who over the years helped me keep my gb-142 unit running despite a crappy install. Even with high efficiency, I will be almost dead before I make any money back on my investments. Live and learn. Knowledge I can pass onto my children. If I could do it over again I would of gone to school for this stuff. It intrigues me. You guys are full of knowledge, but most importantly you give the average joe hope that there is a solution when it’s 15 degrees outside and you have no heat or hot water. One pic is of my 10 year old gb. Other is a day of getting new boiler in. Added new back flow preventer, pressure regulator,
new expansion tank with better set up, dirt separator, condensate neutralizer. Tomorrow new water tank in better location. Rerouting of exhaust and intake. New boiler is an ibc about half the size of my buderus 142/60. Thank you all and god bless.

Comments

  • HVACNUTHVACNUT Member Posts: 2,630
    Its basically a swap out.
    Most everything else is existing. And I wouldn't exactly say it was "crappy".
  • ZmanZman Member Posts: 5,334
    Thanks for sharing.
    I noticed the lack of primer on the vent connections. I am sure you will remedy that when you redo. :)
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
  • ChrisJChrisJ Member Posts: 10,239
    > @Zman said:
    > Thanks for sharing.
    > I noticed the lack of primer on the vent connections. I am sure you will remedy that when you redo. :)

    Maybe.....but you can buy clear primer. I use it on my own stuff because I can get away with it. They also have primer that's clear but glows under a black light.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • ZmanZman Member Posts: 5,334
    @ChrisJ
    That may well be the case.
    Using clear primer on venting is a bad idea. You could lose track of which fitting are primed and you will definitely fail an inspection.
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
  • ChrisJChrisJ Member Posts: 10,239
    > @Zman said:
    > @ChrisJ
    > That may well be the case.
    > Using clear primer on venting is a bad idea. You could lose track of which fitting are primed and you will definitely fail an inspection.

    Do you lose track of which fittings are glued? Being the cement is clear and all...
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • ZmanZman Member Posts: 5,334
    @ChrisJ
    You should use whichever primer you want....
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
  • HVACNUTHVACNUT Member Posts: 2,630
    Shouldn't it be neither clear nor purple?
    Shouldn't it have been vented with polypropylene?
  • GWGW Member Posts: 3,457
    I’m going to take it upon myself to do a purple primer how to video, there’s just some basic tricks. Purple is for pros :)
    Gary Wilson
    Wilson Services, Inc
    Northampton, MA
    www.wilsonph.com
    [email protected]
  • invermontinvermont Member Posts: 66
    > @HVACNUT said:
    > Its basically a swap out.
    > Most everything else is existing. And I wouldn't exactly say it was "crappy

    It is when the exhaust and intake are 1foot from an inside corner.. Ate it up. Almost twice the size I needed for my house. Couple other things that were never done that would of probably doubled it’s life.
  • invermontinvermont Member Posts: 66
    > @Zman said:
    > Thanks for sharing.
    > I noticed the lack of primer on the vent connections. I am sure you will remedy that when you redo. :)

    I glue water pipes that carry 136psi. Purple can look nasty if you over run it
  • the_donutthe_donut Member Posts: 374
    Purple is great for visibility and is fine if you don’t make a mess. I remember working in crawlspace where the only entrance was 40’ in prone position crawling from where I needed to be. The saw slipped and I cut my finger (trying to do the install in one go without measuring and crawling back out). Had a bit of primer dribble into the cut. Feels just like liquid stitch. Would’ve been easier to spot with purple.
  • Rich_49Rich_49 Member Posts: 2,540
    edited March 2018
    Purple is your friend . You can hardly see it .
    You didn't get what you didn't pay for and it will never be what you thought it would .
    Langans Plumbing & Heating LLC
    732-751-1560
    Serving most of New Jersey, Eastern Pa .
    Consultation, Design & Installation anywhere
    Rich McGrath 732-581-3833
  • ChrisJChrisJ Member Posts: 10,239
    edited March 2018
    Let's get back to talking about the ops install..
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • GWGW Member Posts: 3,457
    Looks good, I might have taken the 20 minutes to neaten/straighten some of the wiring
    Gary Wilson
    Wilson Services, Inc
    Northampton, MA
    www.wilsonph.com
    [email protected]
  • IronmanIronman Member Posts: 5,305
    edited March 2018
    How about "Hot Glue" which does not require primer?



    We use primer with it regardless.

    Maybe we should start a thread about PVC joining techniques like GW mentioned.
    Bob Boan


    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.
  • invermontinvermont Member Posts: 66
    Zman said:

    @ChrisJ
    That may well be the case.
    Using clear primer on venting is a bad idea. You could lose track of which fitting are primed and you will definitely fail an inspection.

    Zman, Vermont doesn’t have inspectors for residential. The only time your house gets inspected is when you go to sell it. Then it is usually someone who has basically taken online course. It’s a problem.
  • kcoppkcopp Member Posts: 3,368
    You will be really happy w/ that set up.
    Very reliable boiler.
    I have a bunch of them in and I have been very happy w/ the results.
    Its a dream to service and it only has 4 moving parts.
  • invermontinvermont Member Posts: 66
    kcopp said:

    You will be really happy w/ that set up.
    Very reliable boiler.
    I have a bunch of them in and I have been very happy w/ the results.
    Its a dream to service and it only has 4 moving parts.

    Thanks kcopp, I had them move exhaust and air intake out of the inside of a corner. Exhaust was moved over to be more away from inside corner. Intake was put about a foot around the corner on a different wall. All together about 5 feet from each other. I’m still worried about it sucking on exhaust. In the wind last night I could see some steam blowing around the corner and coming near the intake. I’m wondering if I should have them come back and check on that
  • kcoppkcopp Member Posts: 3,368
    Can you snorkel it up and have the termination up at a 45 like they show in the book?
  • invermontinvermont Member Posts: 66
    kcopp said:

    Can you snorkel it up and have the termination up at a 45 like they show in the book?

    Here is a photo. I read the book. It almost seems I could almost go as high as I want within reason. I don’t think 3 or 4 feet should make a difference. I know one set up shows air at ground and exhaust straight up through 2 story roof if I remember right. They even mentioned something about not worrying about rain getting in because the condensate pump would take care of it
  • invermontinvermont Member Posts: 66
  • kcoppkcopp Member Posts: 3,368
    You should be fine w/ cross contamination. Especially since its around the corner.
    Personally I would like to see the intake a bit higher of the ground and at 90. You don't want the intake to suck in fluffy snow.
  • invermontinvermont Member Posts: 66
    kcopp said:

    You should be fine w/ cross contamination. Especially since its around the corner.
    Personally I would like to see the intake a bit higher of the ground and at 90. You don't want the intake to suck in fluffy snow.

    Was thinking same about the 90. I’m thinking on cutting that 45 off and adding one. There’s a short retaining wall I put in there next to my patio. I’m going to get rid of that to give me some more height on my intake. I was just freaked out watching some wisps of steam blowing down around the intake in the wind last night. Only happens when it’s firing low. I guess you could get that with most set ups
  • rickhrickh Member Posts: 22
    IBC states the exhaust cannot be PVC. We use Centhrotherm, usually on both, it looks goofy with 2 different types of piping. Boilers are very reliable
  • kcoppkcopp Member Posts: 3,368
    rickh said:

    IBC states the exhaust cannot be PVC. We use Centhrotherm, usually on both, it looks goofy with 2 different types of piping. Boilers are very reliable

    Where are you reading that?
    I admit pvc is a less desirable venting material.
    Page 1-5 says it is approved in the US... if you are in NH or NY you may not use pvc,
  • invermontinvermont Member Posts: 66
    kcopp said:

    rickh said:

    IBC states the exhaust cannot be PVC. We use Centhrotherm, usually on both, it looks goofy with 2 different types of piping. Boilers are very reliable

    Where are you reading that?
    I admit pvc is a less desirable venting material.
    Page 1-5 says it is approved in the US... if you are in NH or NY you may not use pvc,
    Not sure of the piping. Just before it enters the house it is dark gray.
  • heatheadheathead Member Posts: 88
    From IBC manual

    c) Sidewall Direct Vent with separate vent and air pipes shall be terminated as
    follows:
    • Both the inlet and exhaust terminations shall be located on the same plane (side) of
    the building.

    This means it cant be on two different walls. It has to do with air pressure differences when the wind hits the building.
  • invermontinvermont Member Posts: 66
    heathead said:

    From IBC manual

    c) Sidewall Direct Vent with separate vent and air pipes shall be terminated as
    follows:
    • Both the inlet and exhaust terminations shall be located on the same plane (side) of
    the building.

    This means it cant be on two different walls. It has to do with air pressure differences when the wind hits the building.

    I read that. They also show intake at ground and exhaust through the roof of the house. I sent a photo to ibc to see what they say
  • HVACguyinMEHVACguyinME Member Posts: 25
    Two things, PVC is perfectly fine with venting any IBC, it all depends on AHJ. And the venting on this boiler is not correct, the air intake is on a different plain then the exhaust. Another words the air intake and exhaust need to be on the same side of the house.
  • EBEBRATT-EdEBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 6,113
    @GW I for one need your purple primer video. Anything to do with caulking, glueing , sealing and I am a complete mess.

    LOL where I worked 20 years ago one of my friends who was a tech there go up in a meeting and said to the service manager. "you know Ed is good at a lot of things but don't let him use a F-----g caulking gun"
  • GWGW Member Posts: 3,457
    yes just a couple of simple tips and you can be a purple pro. I'll make a vid someday.
    Gary Wilson
    Wilson Services, Inc
    Northampton, MA
    www.wilsonph.com
    [email protected]
  • Rich_49Rich_49 Member Posts: 2,540

    Two things, PVC is perfectly fine with venting any IBC, it all depends on AHJ. And the venting on this boiler is not correct, the air intake is on a different plain then the exhaust. Another words the air intake and exhaust need to be on the same side of the house.

    That rule does not apply to all appliances
    You didn't get what you didn't pay for and it will never be what you thought it would .
    Langans Plumbing & Heating LLC
    732-751-1560
    Serving most of New Jersey, Eastern Pa .
    Consultation, Design & Installation anywhere
    Rich McGrath 732-581-3833
  • HVACguyinMEHVACguyinME Member Posts: 25
    @Rich_49 That is why I said "IBC"
  • Jean-David BeyerJean-David Beyer Member Posts: 2,644
    Do you lose track of which fittings are glued? Being the cement is clear and all...


    I do not, since I am not a heating contractor. But the contractor that installed my mod-con did lose track. They put purple primer on the exhaust, but forgot to put the glue in. Later, the condensate ran into the boiler on the outside of the exhaust pipe and drowned the control board.

    If I were running things, the primer and the glue would have perhaps faint different colors but together, they would be a loud visible color.
  • Solid_Fuel_ManSolid_Fuel_Man Member Posts: 1,759
    @Jean-David Beyer I've often thought that very same thing.

    CPVC cement is bright orange, and I've wondered why it isnt required to have regular PVC cement a color as well.
    Serving Northern Maine HVAC, and Controls
  • ratioratio Member Posts: 2,135
    There's a few brands around here that have a blue-colored glue (supposed to be water resistant, for gluing in the rain I guess?) that I use, so I can always tell if I glued a joint, or if someone's made any changes to what I did.
  • HomerJSmithHomerJSmith Member Posts: 718
    What is the best way of gluing CPVC to PVC? Opinions please.
  • ZmanZman Member Posts: 5,334
    This sounds like the making of a new thread. Not really relevant to this guy's install.
    I like this article https://www.commercial-industrial-supply.com/resource-center/gluing-pvc-and-cpvc-together/
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
  • ChrisJChrisJ Member Posts: 10,239
    I use clear primer and glue with no issues.
    But I'll admit I don't do many joints at a time and it's on my own time so I can take my time and take as long as I want.

    It's a little different when you're trying to move fast etc.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • ratioratio Member Posts: 2,135

    What is the best way of gluing CPVC to PVC? Opinions please.

    AFAIK you can't glue PVC to CPVC—the chlorine changes things enough that they're not all that compatible. I suggest a mechanical joint.

    That said, aroud here the big box stores all carry a glue that's supposed to do the deed, & I have no data to refute that. I have to admit that, if I were rushed or otherwise limited, I would try it…

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