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Clocking my gas meter

On my Peerless 211A, 1,050,000 BTU, the 10 cubic foot gas meter dial takes 38 seconds to make a complete rotation.
Does that equate to that input?—NBC

Comments

  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 11,058
    3600 X 10 X 1000 = 36,000,000 / 38 seconds = 947,368 BTUH.

    The 1000 is the btu content per cubic foot. It could be higher.
    MUD could tell you the btu content. Sometimes 1040.

    In that case 37,440,000/ 38 =985,263 btuh.

    Sounds right?
  • Zman
    Zman Member Posts: 7,569
    There is probably more than one way to slice this. Assuming you are working with low-pressure gas, I would figure it like this.
    10,370 (BTU content of 10 CF) /38= 272.895 BTU/second.
    272.895 x 60 = 16,373.67 BTU/minute
    16,373.67 x 60 = 982,421 BTU/hour
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 11,058
    Zman, I wouldn't do it that way without a calculator! too many decimals ;)
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 15,512
    60 min in an hour 60 seconds in a minuite= 60 x60=3,600 seconds / hour

    3600 sec/38 seconds =94.73 10 cfh revolutions/hour.

    94.73 x 10=947.37 x 1000btu/cubic ft of gas (assuming your gas is 1000 btu/cu ft) =947,368 BTU/hour
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 15,512
    This might help
  • PC7060
    PC7060 Member Posts: 1,156
    at close to a million btu a hour the differences between the 3 responses are pretty small.  Almost in the fly poo in the pepper range.  :D
    JUGHNEedg2103foresthillsjd
  • Zman
    Zman Member Posts: 7,569
    The only difference is the assumption of BTU content.
    This thread has great info on cheater cards and pressure compensation. https://forum.heatinghelp.com/discussion/180758/wallet-cards-for-clocking-gas-meters#latest
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
  • Chris_L
    Chris_L Member Posts: 336
    Does your gas bill list the BTU content? If so, no need for assumptions.

    In many places, gas is billed in therms or other energy units (BTUs or multiples thereof). Since the meter measurement is always volumetric, the bill shows the conversion from volume units to energy units.

    For example, my last bill from what was once Boston Gas has a "thermal factor" of 1.0304, i.e., 1030.4 BTU/cubic foot.
    JUGHNE
  • Thanks all-So it appears I am pretty close to the rated input.
    last winter, during a cold snap here, I noticed my pressure getting up beyond a pound, which almost never happens. I read that our gas company were mixing other gasses into the mix, and thought maybe the BTU value was higher.
    Since then I have taken down all my 17 Gorton 2’s, and rinsed them out, as I noticed my back pressure of venting was up to 4 ounces, instead of under 2!
    when it’s a bit more chilly out, I will observe again.—NBC 
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 15,512
    @nicholas bonham-carter

    The gas company especially in areas with low pressure mains or anywhere where they are hurting for capacity when it's cold out they jamb propane into the mix to keep the pressure up.

    It's called "shaving" but I don't know why they call it that
  • PC7060
    PC7060 Member Posts: 1,156
    edited November 2021
    @nicholas bonham-carter The gas company especially in areas with low pressure mains or anywhere where they are hurting for capacity when it's cold out they jamb propane into the mix to keep the pressure up. It's called "shaving" but I don't know why they call it that
    Seems like it should called “boosting” since propane has 2.5x the BTU of same volume of NG. Wondering if they mix it with nitrogen to get the right energy mix. 
  • nicholas bonham-carter
    nicholas bonham-carter Member Posts: 8,576





    Still working on this, and because of the suspected over-firing, I think my 0-15 oz. gauge has been tweaked, so it does not rest at zero. Both gauges-boiler, and rad have been affected.
    I wonder if it is worth an attempted repair.
    I did have someone put a gauge on the gas line test port, and the pressure is in spec; however that was during higher daytime temperatures, when they might not have juiced the gas mix and pressure.—NBC 
  • ratio
    ratio Member Posts: 3,623
    Have you tried zeroing the gauge? Adjust the li'l screw in the middle (with the + & - sign) until the needle rests on zero—I turn it back & forth a few times so it's not loaded one direction more than the other. Use the right screwdriver, too big a head will tear up the slot in the screw.
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 11,058
    NBC, wouldn't the vaporstat have controlled the pressure to prevent over pressuring?

    Are you sure that gauge wasn't pulled back by vacuum?

    Is there a stop peg for the needle?
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 15,512
    @nicholas bonham-carter

    Decent gauges like the one you have can be adjusted as @ratio mentionned
  • nicholas bonham-carter
    nicholas bonham-carter Member Posts: 8,576
    There are 2 screws-one marked +, and the other marked -
    I’ll have to visit the Wika website, and see what information is there.—NBC 
  • ratio
    ratio Member Posts: 3,623
    I think you'll find the two outer screws hold the face on, and the '+' and '-' are directions for the center screw.
    JUGHNE
  • nicholas bonham-carter
    nicholas bonham-carter Member Posts: 8,576
    I turned the zero adjustment screw, and still no joy, so my WIKA 0-15 ounce gauges need replacement.
    Can anyone recommend another low pressure gauge with better vacuum resistance, (maybe Dwyer?), while I work on solving my vacuum problem?—NBC
  • neilc
    neilc Member Posts: 2,700
    a compound gage ?
    15 0 15 ?
    known to beat dead horses
  • nicholas bonham-carter
    nicholas bonham-carter Member Posts: 8,576
    Ideally, a compound gauge with a big scale showing ounces on the positive end of the scale, and able to tolerate a vacuum.—NBC 
  • Chris_L
    Chris_L Member Posts: 336
    Did you remove the gauge before trying to zero it? And make sure there is no water in it?

    The pigtail can create a vacuum. If water gets into many low-pressure gauges, it can cause an inaccurate reading (unless the gauge is specifically designed for liquids).
  • Daveinscranton
    Daveinscranton Member Posts: 148
    edited January 2022
    Maybe a big big water manometer.  Could see vacuum and pressure.
  • ethicalpaul
    ethicalpaul Member Posts: 5,701
    This one is kinda pricey for eBay but search for similar ones: https://www.ebay.com/itm/234330450621?hash=item368f2eeabd:g:zPEAAOSwCJBhtL9y

    This model handles +/- 15 psi regardless of the gauge range
    NJ Steam Homeowner. See my sight glass boiler videos: https://bit.ly/3sZW1el
  • fentonc
    fentonc Member Posts: 236
    I just tried this measurement for my nominally 140K BTU/hr boiler, and it clocked in at 120 ft^3/hr, or 123,360 BTU/hr with the conversion factor provided by my utility. That's only 88% of its rated output - I'm surprised it was off by that much! Is that primarily because the utility is providing lower pressure than the nominal input pressure the boiler is rated at?