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11/16 OD copper pipe!? Can't find fittings

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Comments

  • Zipper13
    Zipper13 Member Posts: 229
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    Yeah this isn't a good location for torch work. I'm thinking the best (safest) option is to cut the chrome pipe off, open the wall a little and put a 5/8" OD brass compression union (at the drywall) and add a couple inches of 1/2" pipe sticking into the room, and then a compression shutoff on to that.
    New owner of a 1920s home with steam heat north of Boston.
    Just trying to learn what I can do myself and what I just shouldn't touch
  • Intplm.
    Intplm. Member Posts: 2,037
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    If you use a low flame torch tip and heat the tube away from the wall it will come off without the damage you are worried about. You have to remove it slowly, with a wrench on the end and the torch tip near the wall. It will work. Removing / cutting into the wall is a lot more work. You shouldn't have to do that unless as a last resort.
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 9,840
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    Also there is a toilet in the way which makes all of it jut that much more difficult.
  • Zipper13
    Zipper13 Member Posts: 229
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    @GW I see what you mean, the whole thing is a sleeve over the pipe, and I cut off the only good part to grab hold of. That totally went over my head when I dove into this without researching. ( truth be told I asked on a different message board since this wasn't Heating-related. Had I started here instead I'd be in a much better position to either do it right or I wouldn't have assumed I could do it myself.) Not knowing better assumed this was just a thicker walled nipple that had maybe a half inch of overlap with the pipe out of the wall. nope the thickness is the sleeve plus the pipe. live and learn.

    I might try to peel it back a bit like @Intplm. suggested so that I'll have enough pipe beyond the drywall to attach a compression fit shut off. if not, I'll cut it, open the wall a bit and add a compression union and a nipple to work with.
    New owner of a 1920s home with steam heat north of Boston.
    Just trying to learn what I can do myself and what I just shouldn't touch
  • psb75
    psb75 Member Posts: 848
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    Flare fitting? With which size flare nut? Flare a chrome-sleeved 1/2" copper pipe? This is getting kind of confusing.
  • Zipper13
    Zipper13 Member Posts: 229
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    @psb75 never mind. I think I got where I needed to be...I just made it a lot more difficult for myself by thinking I knew what I was doing two weeks ago
    New owner of a 1920s home with steam heat north of Boston.
    Just trying to learn what I can do myself and what I just shouldn't touch
  • psb75
    psb75 Member Posts: 848
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    There's no harm in asking for help. I just worry about some of the potential "solutions" provided.
  • Zipper13
    Zipper13 Member Posts: 229
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    @psb75 understood. I think I got more out of the general discussion rather than an explicit set of how to's. and I'm good with that. Most importantly, I found out I was trying to attack a situation that I wasn't actually in! And that made my situation harder to get out of. I now know that I do have standard pipes sizes here and that openes up a lot of standard tools and fittings to explore. Since I've shorted this stub so much now (not realizing it was a sleeve over the stub), I want to avoid solder for now as I have no good way to protect the upstream tee from melting and dont want to have top open up the wall to deal with it. Had I come here first, I would not have approached this problem at all like I did two weeks ago.
    New owner of a 1920s home with steam heat north of Boston.
    Just trying to learn what I can do myself and what I just shouldn't touch
  • Alan (California Radiant) Forbes
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    I think we all learned a lot. Thanks!
    8.33 lbs./gal. x 60 min./hr. x 20°ΔT = 10,000 BTU's/hour

    Two btu per sq ft for degree difference for a slab
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 9,840
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    If you slice it up, you could also potentially get the pieces off with a 100w iron like this:
    https://www.rings-things.com/Products/Soldering-Irons-and-Tools-for-Soft-Solder-Jewelry/Choice-trade-100W-Soldering-Iron.html

    You will have to file/sand the chrome off and use some flux for the solder to wet that piece and transfer the heat.
  • rick in Alaska
    rick in Alaska Member Posts: 1,458
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    Are we sure that is a sleeve over the tube, and not just coated? The picture of it cut off, and the od measurement,looks like it isn't but I am not sure. I did not know they made those with a sleeve on them, so that makes it more difficult for sure.
    Rick
  • Intplm.
    Intplm. Member Posts: 2,037
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    @Zipper13 Before you remove the toilet. And you might have to. Get a very small and sharp wood chisel. Try to gently tap/hit between the end of the copper tubing and CP tube. This can provide an end point. Or, something to grab onto with pliers. Then with a little of the pealed chrome off the copper, heat it with a torch. While heating, pull the chrome off as if you were removing a soldered copper fitting, cause in actuality, you are.

    Best of luck to you. This can and has been done before.
    MikeL_2
  • Intplm.
    Intplm. Member Posts: 2,037
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    Another thought.

    If you have a mini tubing cutter. Start cutting the chrome but only enough to make a grove at about a quarter inch from the currently cut end.
    Then use a cutter as something to grab as you un-solder the joint.
    CLamb
  • george_42
    george_42 Member Posts: 121
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    a 5/8 opened end wrench will fit over the copper near the wall and can be used to push the chrome sleeve off after heating with a torch. put some putty in the hole in the wall to keep flames from going in wall and to act as heat sink
    Intplm.
  • GW
    GW Member Posts: 4,731
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    >
    > I might try to peel it back a bit like @Intplm. suggested so that I'll have enough pipe beyond the drywall to attach a compression fit shut off. if not, I'll cut it, open the wall a bit and add a compression union and a nipple to work with.

    Ok I hope it works, not a good thing if you’re not super comfortable with a torch
    Gary Wilson
    Wilson Services, Inc
    Northampton, MA
    gary@wilsonph.com
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 9,840
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    It looks like that was probably put on before the baseboard but that giant escutcheon is to give it enough clearance from the wall to sweat it. A small pencil torch is a lot more controllable than the ts-8000 i use fore most things.
  • pecmsg
    pecmsg Member Posts: 4,909
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    Are you comfortable Taping and Spackling?

    Then cut the wall out
    Pump sprayer with water, Wet everything at first, Mist everything while soldering!
    mattmia2
  • Intplm.
    Intplm. Member Posts: 2,037
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    Excellent !
  • george_42
    george_42 Member Posts: 121
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    you are well on your way to be a master plumber, george
  • BillyO
    BillyO Member Posts: 277
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    great job!!!!
  • HVACNUT
    HVACNUT Member Posts: 5,870
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    > @Zipper13 said:
    > I got the sleeve off.
    > I slowly filed a line longitudinally across the top until I saw silver. Heated it and with the tang of the file put pressure on the back lip of the sleeve kind of how @george_42 suggested with the open wrench. No binding and it slid right off. just need to clean the stub and attach the compression fit shut off. I didn't open the wall at all yet, but I will anyway to verify that I didn't melt the upstream tee and cause any leaks. I've made enough mistakes on this already. No good reason not to open up and be sure.


    Post a pic of that!

    And hurry up and finish. I've been clenching my butt cheeks for 3 days.
    SuperTechIntplm.
  • HomerJSmith
    HomerJSmith Member Posts: 2,477
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    Intplm.Larry WeingartenBillyOratio
  • BillyO
    BillyO Member Posts: 277
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    Wow, I have never seen this wrench.I Love It!!!!!!!!!

  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 23,543
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    I think one of the electric clamp type pipe soldering tools might work on that thing. Might work.

    However.

    Much as I appreciate @rick in Alaska 's comments, if the wall is older lathe and plaster, which it looks as though it might be, using a torch anywhere near it is a major fire hazard. The lathe inside the wall is not protected by the plaster (or much of anything else, comes to that) and has rather fine slivers all over it, and it will be very dry. In the camping and bush trade it's called "tinder". The heat from soldering alone won't -- usually -- ignite it, though it may char. An errant flame -- even momentarily -- will ignite it. Inside the wall, where you can't see it. This can ruin your whole day... although if you notice it for some reason fast enough, and have an axe or a sledge handy, you can usually pull the fire down and out before the fire trucks get there.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
    mattmia2