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Online HVAC Certifications

ethicalpaulethicalpaul Member Posts: 1,606
Hey gang--

If I wanted to move beyond just "knows enough to be dangerous", is there a good online course provider that you would feel good about? I like learning things generally and I want to know more about HVAC systems. I want to know more about my systems, or maybe I'd want to be a helper as a side gig someday.

Basically is there an online HVAC course that would get me enough to know what I'm doing and/or prepare me for certifications?

Thanks
1 pipe Utica 112 in Cedar Grove, NJ, coal > oil > NG

Comments

  • CBRobCBRob Member Posts: 179
    Paul,
    I was wondering the same thing.

    I can afford to take classes, I can't afford to be an apprentice for 3000 hours.

    I think on the legal side of things, I can install boilers and heat but can not hook up the dhw or the gas line.
  • ethicalpaulethicalpaul Member Posts: 1,606
    Thanks @CBRob that's interesting. No DHW huh? Weird.

    Are you referring to your own house, or others'? And what is your geography if I may ask? I'm in Northern NJ and they still let homeowners do at least some of our own work.
    1 pipe Utica 112 in Cedar Grove, NJ, coal > oil > NG
    CBRob
  • CBRobCBRob Member Posts: 179
    Just the rules and regs for Colorado.

    Everything heat related is fine, except for the gas line.

    And technically, nothing to do with drinking water without a plumbing license.

    The way things are here in the ski resort part of Colorado, I'm going to be my own boiler guy whenever possible.

    On my own house anything goes.
    I'm a property manager, and have been subbing out all my boiler work.

    I don't really need to learn anything about the AC part of things...
    AT least not till global warming warms us up a couple more degrees.
  • ZmanZman Member Posts: 5,830
    This is a good one for the mathematically inclined.
    https://www.heatspring.com/courses/mastering-hydronic-system-design/
    They used to have one called "Integrated HVAC Engineering by Robert Bean" which was fantastic. You may want to ask if they plan on bringing it back.
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
    CBRobSeanBeans
  • ethicalpaulethicalpaul Member Posts: 1,606
    Thank you both
    1 pipe Utica 112 in Cedar Grove, NJ, coal > oil > NG
  • EBEBRATT-EdEBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 7,050
    @ethicalpaul

    beleive me you probably know more about steam that 95% of the people that do this full time. Maybe their is voc tech school in your area that has classes. Ask around at some supply houses they usually know what's going on.

    And hang out here
    ethicalpaulZmanIntplm.
  • ethicalpaulethicalpaul Member Posts: 1,606
    Thanks @EBEBRATT-Ed !

    Can I study for certifications and take state tests?
    1 pipe Utica 112 in Cedar Grove, NJ, coal > oil > NG
  • Mike_SheppardMike_Sheppard Member Posts: 657
    This is a good textbook
    Never stop learning.
    ethicalpaul
  • ethicalpaulethicalpaul Member Posts: 1,606
    Thanks Mike!
    1 pipe Utica 112 in Cedar Grove, NJ, coal > oil > NG
  • EzzyTEzzyT Member Posts: 988
    @ethicalpaul are you trying to get the NJ HVACR license? If so then you must work for a NJ Licensed HVACR company for a minimum of 5 years with 4 years of schooling. Once you’ve completed that then you must submit your paperwork to the State and they will notify you when you can sit and take your NJ HVACR license test.
    Creative Solutions Plumbing & Heating LLC
    Lic #12683
    Co-Owners: Fred Drescher, Jr & Eliezer "Ezzy" Travis
    Marketing & Operations: Dawn Drescher
    201.499.0223
    Follow us on Facebook.
    Check us out on Instagram: creative_solutions519
    ethicalpaul
  • SlamDunkSlamDunk Member Posts: 812
    That is intense
    ethicalpaul
  • ethicalpaulethicalpaul Member Posts: 1,606
    Thanks @EzzyT that is more time than I can currently invest!

    I take it that 4 years of schooling doesn’t have much steam content!
    1 pipe Utica 112 in Cedar Grove, NJ, coal > oil > NG
  • EzzyTEzzyT Member Posts: 988
    Correct very little steam content in the schooling.
    Creative Solutions Plumbing & Heating LLC
    Lic #12683
    Co-Owners: Fred Drescher, Jr & Eliezer "Ezzy" Travis
    Marketing & Operations: Dawn Drescher
    201.499.0223
    Follow us on Facebook.
    Check us out on Instagram: creative_solutions519
    ethicalpaul
  • ethicalpaulethicalpaul Member Posts: 1,606
    Thanks. So that makes me think of a question. I don't think @DanHolohan was a licensed plumber (although I don't know this). And he has said he's not an engineer. The picture I have is that he was a kind of sales consultant for contractors and then an independent consultant?

    So what if any licensing or certification did he have as he consulted with many clients across (I think) many states? Or is none required to do that kind of practice?
    1 pipe Utica 112 in Cedar Grove, NJ, coal > oil > NG
  • mikeg2015mikeg2015 Member Posts: 1,178
    edited December 2019

    Thanks @EBEBRATT-Ed !



    Can I study for certifications and take state tests?

    Most states require you put in a certain number of hours as an apprentice. In Iowa here, they want 8000 hours under a Master HVAC license. So about 4 years. I have one under my belt. They also require 200 some classroom hours. So I have that to look forward to. My 15 years as a facility engineer, PLC controls and working on Packaging Systems, along with. Bachelor of Science degree, unfortunately counts for nothing.

    Starting over. I get it. But still sucks. Fortunately the boss realizes the potentional and pays me closer to journeyman wages. Some days I earn it, other days I’m clearly a rookie.
    ethicalpaul
  • SlamDunkSlamDunk Member Posts: 812
    If you are going to work on someone else's property, in someone else's home, you should fulfill all licensing requirements. It is a weeding out process and an opportunity to learn from experience simultaneously. Outside of that, you can learn as much as you want, anyway you want. You wont hurt anyone.
    ethicalpaul
  • SeanBeansSeanBeans Member Posts: 483
    edited December 2019
    I was lucky enough to get grandfathered in, in NJ =D

    Who is going to go through all that trouble to get licensed in NJ?
    ethicalpaul
  • JakeCKJakeCK Member Posts: 138
    > @SeanBeans said:
    > I was lucky enough to get grandfathered in, in NJ =D
    >
    > Who is going to go through all that trouble to get licensed in NJ?
    >
    >

    And people wonder why the trades are suffering.

    As someone just starting out in life 4 years in college for a worth while degree can get you a career making almost six figures out of the gate, if you have the mind for it. That vs just as long as an apprentice plus the class room time and the money still hardly compares and you get dirty everyday.
    For those of us approaching middle age... Take my self for an example I would certainly consider HVAC, plumbing, or electrical but I have a family to keep warm and fed. I could never afford to drop what I'm doing now and start over.
    Intplm.
  • Intplm.Intplm. Member Posts: 1,158

    Thanks @EBEBRATT-Ed !



    Can I study for certifications and take state tests?

    Not usually. One of the best ways to find out about requirements is to get in touch with the state licensing agency in your area.
    Or better yet find a trade school that offers classes to your schedule. They can most often give you a road map on what requirements need to be met for your needs
    ethicalpaul
  • ethicalpaulethicalpaul Member Posts: 1,606
    edited December 2019
    > @SlamDunk said:
    > If you are going to work on someone else's property, in someone else's home, you should fulfill all licensing requirements. It is a weeding out process and an opportunity to learn from experience simultaneously. Outside of that, you can learn as much as you want, anyway you want. You wont hurt anyone.

    Thank you. I tend to agree with you. And yet most or all of the people who installed the systems (I’m referring to steam systems in particular) that time and time again we see here (and in my own house) that are substandard or even ridiculous— all those guys made it through the weeding process. So how good is it?
    1 pipe Utica 112 in Cedar Grove, NJ, coal > oil > NG
    Canucker
  • ethicalpaulethicalpaul Member Posts: 1,606
    > @JakeCK said:
    >
    > As someone just starting out in life 4 years in college for a worth while degree can get you a career making almost six figures out of the gate, if you have the mind for it. That vs just as long as an apprentice plus the class room time and the money still hardly compares and you get dirty everyday.
    > For those of us approaching middle age... Take my self for an example I would certainly consider HVAC, plumbing, or electrical but I have a family to keep warm and fed. I could never afford to drop what I'm doing now and start over.

    I couldn’t do it either. Maybe as a side gig after I retire I could work toward it but I’m not sure I could handle the physical wear and tear at that point (or even now, who am I kidding!)
    1 pipe Utica 112 in Cedar Grove, NJ, coal > oil > NG
  • ethicalpaulethicalpaul Member Posts: 1,606
    > @SeanBeans said:
    > I was lucky enough to get grandfathered in, in NJ =D
    >
    > Who is going to go through all that trouble to get licensed in NJ?

    So the licensing got stricter recently in NJ? If I may ask, what experiences allowed you to get grandfathered?
    1 pipe Utica 112 in Cedar Grove, NJ, coal > oil > NG
  • SeanBeansSeanBeans Member Posts: 483
    I had gone to trade school,
    I had 3-4 years verifiable experience in the field (I forget which amount was needed)
    And I sent in my $125 application fee in before the deadline.

    There may have been another prerequisite but it’s been quite a while.

    I don’t know if I’ll ever have to really use the license because I like to work for companies that supply work rather than finding my own work.. but I’ll have it just in case.
    ethicalpaul
  • SlamDunkSlamDunk Member Posts: 812

    > @SlamDunk said:

    > If you are going to work on someone else's property, in someone else's home, you should fulfill all licensing requirements. It is a weeding out process and an opportunity to learn from experience simultaneously. Outside of that, you can learn as much as you want, anyway you want. You wont hurt anyone.



    Thank you. I tend to agree with you. And yet most or all of the people who installed the systems (I’m referring to steam systems in particular) that time and time again we see here (and in my own house) that are substandard or even ridiculous— all those guys made it through the weeding process. So how good is it?

    Well, you have a point. But there are also doctors who just made C's. You don't want them working on you anymore than you want someone who squeaked by an HVAC/R certification process installing a steam system.
    ethicalpaul
  • Intplm.Intplm. Member Posts: 1,158
    @ethicalpaul Grandfathered means that someone had a license that is related to there current license but has now branched off to a newly formed license required by their state.

    For example.
    In the nineteen eighties, the state of connecticut decided that the fire sprinkler license should be covered by a seperate license and no was longer to be covered under the plumbing license.
    They are now considered to be two separate trades.
    In Connecticut, this license is under the lettered -F- designation. (an "F2" therefore is called a journeyman sprinkler fitters license.)
    A -P-lettered designation is a plumber's license. A "P-2" is a journeyman plumbing license.
    So if at that time, you already had a P2 license when the new F2 lic. was started you could apply to take the test for the F2 .

    You would not need to go back to school or go through a new apprenticeship, and submit to all of the new requirements.
    This is, what is referred to as "grandfathered in."

    If you do find a online course that helps you please let me know. I have yet to find one that I can recommend.

    What many in the trade that I know have had to do is physically go to classes and go to work as a apprentice in the field.
    A common set of requirements for a apprenticeship is 4000 hrs. of class time and 4000 hrs. of field work.
    These numbers vary from state to state.
    ethicalpaul
  • ethicalpaulethicalpaul Member Posts: 1,606
    edited December 2019
    Thanks @Intplm. I did know the term, I was curious about the circumstances.

    I have read up a bit and it looks like I can work on my house but if I go to a friend’s house and put on their Gorton #1 that would be a violation. I can tell them they need a Gorton #1 though apparently.

    I was wondering how to be legal about such things. I don’t disagree with licensing but I’m glad NJ has the homeowner exception.

    As far as courses it looks like in NJ a 4 year hvacr degree would be required now but you can drop out of high school and work for a company no problem.

    This comes from my ignorance but this arrangement seems to heavily favor established companies giving them a heavy advantage in the market.
    1 pipe Utica 112 in Cedar Grove, NJ, coal > oil > NG
    SeanBeans
  • SeanBeansSeanBeans Member Posts: 483
    @ethicalpaul

    I agree. The company I worked for at the time didn’t help us much getting the license. We had our Wednesday meeting and at the meeting they dropped in a line that went like

    “Oh by the way today is the last day to apply for the NJ HVAC License”

    Luckily, my dad was semi retired and working at home. I called him and asked him to send in my application! It worked!
    ethicalpaul
  • ethicalpaulethicalpaul Member Posts: 1,606
    Wow! I’m glad you got it in!!
    1 pipe Utica 112 in Cedar Grove, NJ, coal > oil > NG
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