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Which sort of wrench needed for recessed valve?

CLambCLamb Posts: 59Member
edited May 1 in Plumbing

Here is a photo of a recessed shower valve. Which sort of wrench is needed to remove the stem? I know there are hollow hex wrenches (which can remove the sleeve in this case) but a hex wrench won't fit over something with just two flats.

Comments

  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Posts: 10,672Member
    I'm quite sure there is a special wrench. That said, I've always had pretty good luck with a very good crescent wrench, carefully adjusted to fit... just the tips on the flats.

    Unless someone really reefed on the things, should work.
    Jamie



    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.



    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • Intplm.Intplm. Posts: 781Member
    @CLamb A company by the name of "Brass Craft" Makes a set of
    ---shower valve socket wrenches--- made for exactly what you
    have in your picture above.
    Do a quick google search, Im sure they are easy to find, and can be purchased at most hardware stores.
  • EBEBRATT-EdEBEBRATT-Ed Posts: 5,921Member
    @CLamb "basin wrench" might work if it's the big hex nut your talking about. Big box stores usually have them or a plumbing supply house.

    Or you take the whole drain out of the tub which is probably where your going to end up
  • STEAM DOCTORSTEAM DOCTOR Posts: 909Member
    There definitely is a special wrench for they type of cartridge. Similar to the hex wrenches but shaped and sized to fit the two flats
  • george_42george_42 Posts: 62Member
    brasscraft wrench BrassCraft Mfg SFD0408 , it is about $35
  • SlamDunkSlamDunk Posts: 560Member
    Big box stores and harbor freight sells faucet sockets for this job. Works great. About ten bucks.
  • Intplm.Intplm. Posts: 781Member


    @Clamb Here is another manufacturer. This tool is made for exactly what you are doing.
    There are other manufacturers too. Your nearby hardware store might have a set in stock.



  • STEAM DOCTORSTEAM DOCTOR Posts: 909Member
    > @Intplm. said:
    > @Clamb Here is another manufacturer. This tool is made for exactly what you are doing.
    > There are other manufacturers too. Your nearby hardware store might have a set in stock.

    The hex wrenches do not work on cartridges with two flats
  • Intplm.Intplm. Posts: 781Member

    > @Intplm. said:

    > @Clamb Here is another manufacturer. This tool is made for exactly what you are doing.

    > There are other manufacturers too. Your nearby hardware store might have a set in stock.



    The hex wrenches do not work on cartridges with two flats

    That's correct. And his picture shows six flats, just like the deep shower stem socket set I posted above. That type of set is what he should use.
  • STEAM DOCTORSTEAM DOCTOR Posts: 909Member
    Not so sure. There is a hex nut. But behind the hex nut is a second nut with two flats. I think that the second nut needs to be removed if you want to remove the whole stem. Could be wrong.
  • CLambCLamb Posts: 59Member
    edited May 2
    Yes, @STEAM DOCTOR , you are right it is the one with two flats which I want to remove.

    @george_42 that one looks like the right shape now I just have to check to see if it is the right size.
  • Are you sure there are only two flats? I've never seen a valve with just two.
    Often wrong, never in doubt.

    Click here to learn more about this contractor.
  • Intplm.Intplm. Posts: 781Member
    edited May 2
    I agree with @Alan (California Radiant) Forbes There are NOT two flats to be used for service. Sure there are two "flats?" The hex wrench set pictured above is the proper tool for this valve stem. Unless of course this is something "odd ball" that I have never seen before.
    The off round molding behind the hex is a molded casting of the hex. Otherwise a basin wrench will be needed or a special unforeseen type of tool specially made for this brand valve stem will be needed.
    @Clamb , Please post your findings when you discover what you needed to do. You might need both tools.
  • Larry WeingartenLarry Weingarten Posts: 1,530Member
    Hello, This could be a two-step process. Use a deep well socket on the hex first. Once that's out of the way, a crescent or using parallel jaw pliers could get to the flats if needed. Once the actual hex part is off, you may only need a seat wrench to get to the valve seat to resurface or replace.

    Yours, Larry
  • STEAM DOCTORSTEAM DOCTOR Posts: 909Member
    Check out pics. Designed for precisely this type of stem
  • CLambCLamb Posts: 59Member
    Excellent @STEAM DOCTOR . Now where can I get one? What is it called?

    I did remove the hex nut which was just the packing/sleeve nut. A crescent wrench won't fit into the hole. An open end wrench fits in but doesn't get a good enough grip. A 1" nipple fits nicely over the round part so I put the end of once in a vise and flattened it. Using the nipple as a socket (and turning it with a pipe wrench) was better but the flat on the nipple rounded out. Tomorrow I will probably try to make an insert for a 1" nipple and solder it to the inner wall to grip the nut.

    With Teflon tape on the threads I'm surprised it is so hard to turn. I don't want to put too much force on the valve because I don't know what is holding it in place. Ideally, only a torque should be applied. The back is inaccessible except through the basement ceiling underneath requiring a 4' arm to reach. I tried putting some Kroil on the threads. I don't want to apply a torch to it out of fear of starting a fire within the wall.

    The first photo shows the valve (hot water) with the hex sleeve removed. The second photo shows the adjacent cold water valve.

    hot water without sleeve


    cold water
  • STEAM DOCTORSTEAM DOCTOR Posts: 909Member
    @CLamb. Wish that I remember. I picked one up years ago at Alfano Plumbing Supply on Roosevelt Ave in Corona NY. Maybe give them a call and see if they can help you.
  • Larry WeingartenLarry Weingarten Posts: 1,530Member
    edited May 3
    Hi, Have a look here! http://www.faucetshark.com/Price-Pfister-Shower-Stem-Removal-Wrench-p/kiss-08-9416.htm :)

    Yours, Larry
    ps. Rats! I thought I had it, but that isn't the right one. They do have others that look similar. If you have the valve maker's name, they might have a match. :o
    pps. I see they have tools for Indiana Brass, American Standard, and Savoy, made by Kissler. B)
  • Intplm.Intplm. Posts: 781Member
    edited May 3
    A basin wrench, if it will fit, might be next. You might need to chip away some of the grout to fit the basin wrench in there. Darn it all that you need both.
  • Intplm.Intplm. Posts: 781Member
    @mercedes Thats a good idea to try that tool.
    The trouble with these things is you can't tell what you are looking at from the pictures provided or the amount of room needed to access something in such a tight space.
    That tool might fit in that tight space. A good thought.
  • edited May 3
    Well, I'll be. That's a first for me.

    I've had pretty good luck with such things by using needle-nose vice grips to clamp the flats and then a perpendicular crescent wrench on the jaws of the vice grips to loosen the valve.

    I'd also spray some Kroil Oil or some other penetrating material in there to help it along.
    Often wrong, never in doubt.

    Click here to learn more about this contractor.
  • woodrowwoodrow Posts: 24Member
    time for a new valve
  • pecmsgpecmsg Posts: 837Member
    and next time Never Seize the threads!
  • STEAM DOCTORSTEAM DOCTOR Posts: 909Member
    It's literally a 10 second removal with the correct tool.
  • Intplm.Intplm. Posts: 781Member
    Wish I knew the correct name for that tool. PIA one more thing !
  • Larry WeingartenLarry Weingarten Posts: 1,530Member
    Hello, When looking around, it got called a "stem removal wrench". Faucetshark.com has them.

    Yours, Larry
  • CLambCLamb Posts: 59Member
    edited May 4
    Thanks @Larry Weingarten I think I've ordered the correct wrench I'll see when it gets here. https://www.ebay.com/itm/American-Standard-Shower-Stem-Removal-Wrench-Colony-08-9419-/192147505400

    @woodrow If I could replace the valve without breaking up the tile wall I'd do it immediately.
  • billtheplmbr3845billtheplmbr3845 Posts: 39Member
    Supplyhouse.com
    PN/ SFD0408
    Mixete old style valve body wrench
    You may want to put the packing nut back in while trying to get it apart with a home made tool so you don't out of round the part, I believe the correct tool will go over the packing nut. Just my 2cents.
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