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Single vacuum vent

I’d like to try a single vacuum vent on my bedroom radiator so I never have to hear it hiss at the end of a heating cycle. Let the other radiators out of earshot give the air back to the system.

But where to get one?

Also, when folks are talking about the miracle of vacuum on here, are those systems holding the vacuum for the whole 30-60 minutes until the next heat cycle, or are they just holding it longer than I am?
1 pipe Utica 112 in Cedar Grove, NJ. If you see me say something dumb, just think of my poor wife--she has to hear it every day!

Comments

  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Posts: 9,773Member
    There are very few vacuum vents out there that I know of -- in fact, the only one I'm sure of is the Hoffmann 76, which is big and pricey. The apostles of vacuum claim to have had all kinds of miraculous success using various low cracking pressure check valves on regular vents, though, and you might try that.

    Keep in mind that the vacuum won't obligingly stay in that one radiator. It will try to hold the vacuum in the entire system, so if you have other vents they'll all have to be converted, too.
    Jamie



    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.



    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • ethicalpaulethicalpaul Posts: 482Member
    edited February 6
    Yeah I don't want to convert to a whole vacuum system, I want to just keep my bedroom radiator from whistling at the end of a heating cycle.

    does anyone have a link to a miraculous low cracking pressure check valve?

    hmm like this one maybe: https://www.zoro.com/pneumadyne-inc-inline-check-valve-brass-18-fnpt-c050501/i/G4268887/feature-product?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIusPn9qSn4AIV27rACh1cqwpIEAQYBSABEgIB1PD_BwE
    1 pipe Utica 112 in Cedar Grove, NJ. If you see me say something dumb, just think of my poor wife--she has to hear it every day!
  • PMJPMJ Posts: 743Member
    The Hoffman literature clearly states that using their vacuum vent on just one radiator in a one pipe system will cause that rad to heat more than without it. It will also be quiet. I have attached it here.

    Just think about what would happen in one rad when the burn stops with a check valve or vacuum vent. The void created by the condensing steam will be replaced by more steam from the main, instead of air from the room. This will still happen even if the rest of the system is vented. The vacuum won't last long with all the other openings, but that radiator cycle after cycle will condense a greater percentage of the total steam than it would have open vented.

    When the entire system has vacuum vents the radiators all fight over the available steam in the mains and the additional amount still being produced as the pressure drops. In this environment the ones in the coldest areas condensing the most have the deepest vacuum so they get the most - hence the balancing effect. From personal experience I can say this effect is not a minor one.
  • GordoGordo Posts: 647Member
    edited February 6
    @ethicalpaul : Please give us a call or email us. We have a bench tested new/old stock vacuum radiator vent we might be willing to part with.

    We have for your viewing interest the tester we use.

    Please note that the vacuum vent tested in the video below failed to shut against steam pressure, as the magic juice in its inner chamber bled away long ago, so that's NOT the one we'd be sending you!

    With Hoffman vacuum vents, the steam can leak out and hiss if the inner expansion chamber fails, but since the vacuum part of the show is dependent on clever mechanical mechanisms, that part will still tend to work through most cycles. Sometimes the vacuum won't "take" on every cycle and the cycle has to be reset.

    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    "Reducing our country's energy consumption, one system at a time"
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Baltimore, MD (USA) and consulting anywhere.
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  • MotorapidoMotorapido Posts: 148Member

    There are very few vacuum vents out there that I know of -- in fact, the only one I'm sure of is the Hoffmann 76, which is big and pricey. Anybody have a link to a seller of the Hoffman 76 vent with an angle threading that would replace my existing Maid-o-Mist? I'd love to experiment with a vacuum vent on a radiator in my only poorly insulated room that despite good balancing, venting, etc. still results in this one room being about 4 degrees colder than other rooms (it's a one-story 1945 addition and the flat-roof isn't insulated, so this room loses way more heat than the rest of the rooms in the house).

  • JUGHNEJUGHNE Posts: 5,335Member
    edited February 7
    My collection of auction acquired "treasured white elephants", which will sell at my auction someday, included some 1/8" brass swing valves.
    If one of these was put between the rad and vent with a short nipple I wonder if it would pass air/steam and swing shut on shut down holding a vacuum for a time.

    Would water trap between check valve and air vent?
    Would it seal tight enough or add it's own whistle sound effects?
  • ethicalpaulethicalpaul Posts: 482Member
    Thanks, @Gordo but that is too pretty and precious I think for my hacking! Better save that for a vacuum or vapor person or whatever those systems are called!
    1 pipe Utica 112 in Cedar Grove, NJ. If you see me say something dumb, just think of my poor wife--she has to hear it every day!
  • GordoGordo Posts: 647Member
    @ethicalpaul : That vent pictured in the above video is an old failed #2 vent. We have some 20 of the tested Hoffman #2A (adjustable). They are not nearly as pretty, but they work.
    We also have two tested Vent-Rite #2A adjustable, so no worries.
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    "Reducing our country's energy consumption, one system at a time"
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Baltimore, MD (USA) and consulting anywhere.
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/all-steamed-up-inc
  • MotorapidoMotorapido Posts: 148Member
    Following up on my question about trying a Hoffman 76 on a radiator to pull steam in following stat satisfaction, from latent steam by creating vacuum in the radiator with a vacuum vent. Can I adapt a Hoffman 76 for use as a radiator vent? Radiator is recessed in wall, with plenty of space on the vent side if more space is required than the space for the Maid-o-Mist that I currently use. Would this be the Hoffman 76 I would adapt for one-pipe steam radiator use? https://www.supplyhouse.com/Hoffman-401432-76-1-2-x-3-4-Straight-Main-Steam-Vacuum-Valve-11742000-p
  • FredFred Posts: 7,610Member
    @Motorapido , I can't see where you are going with the use of a #76 on a radiator. That would be the largest vent on any of your radiators and probably vent that radiator so quickly that steam would race across the top or bottom of the radiator and close that vent, meaning the room will likely be cold. Even though it is a Vacuum vent, it still has to close, on steam.
  • MotorapidoMotorapido Posts: 148Member
    Fred said:

    @Motorapido , I can't see where you are going with the use of a #76 on a radiator. That would be the largest vent on any of your radiators and probably vent that radiator so quickly that steam would race across the top or bottom of the radiator and close that vent, meaning the room will likely be cold. Even though it is a Vacuum vent, it still has to close, on steam.

    Yeah, good point. Has anybody found a check valve that could be screwed onto the top of a Maid-o-Mist vent that would function as a vacuum vent? My issue is a one-story 1950 addition of a room onto my 1930s one-pipe steam system. The 20x20 room has many big windows and an uninsulated flat roof, so the heat loss from that room exceeds the heat loss of the rest of the house. The rest of the house is two storys and a full attic. Compounding the problem is that a prior owner removed a radiator from the one-floor room addition when building a new walk-in closet. My thought was to add a vacuum vent to the last radiator in the room. That radiator is also the biggest of the three radiators in that room. It seems that might encourage that radiator to continue to draw in some additional latent steam after the boiler is off if I can keep that radiator in vacuum, and thus supply the room with a bit more heat. I generally see a temperature differential of 3 degrees in that room compared to the rest of the house on days that are colder than 40 degrees. However, at 15 degrees and below, that room ends of catching up closer to the heat of the rest of the house, with only about a 1 degree differential, probably because the boiler is running longer and allowing the radiators in that room to fill more completely.
    I'd really like to experiment with a check valve that could be screwed into the top of a Maid-O-Mist vent. Anybody try this and have plans and specifications to share?
  • mikeg2015mikeg2015 Posts: 575Member
    I ended up installing a basic vacuum relief on the end of the main off the antler with the main vents. The challenge is that big mouths don’t open once thermostatically closed. I’m not sure if the Gorton 2 I have does either. It eliminated the noise. I forget which one I used.
  • ethicalpaulethicalpaul Posts: 482Member
    This might help my problem too. I think the radiators are supplying all the air to relieve the vacuum of the mains and it can get noisy. Thanks!
    1 pipe Utica 112 in Cedar Grove, NJ. If you see me say something dumb, just think of my poor wife--she has to hear it every day!
  • FizzFizz Posts: 447Member
    Mepco makes a quick vent vacuum valve, slightly smaller than Hoffman 76. I have 2 on my Richardson System. They work fine putting system in vacuum.
  • PMJPMJ Posts: 743Member
    Does that big radiator ever fill enough to close the vent anyway? Sounds like maybe not if the room is cold.

    To begin the experiment here is what I would try. 1/8 NPT pipe right? Get a nipple, a tee, a small compound vac/pressure gauge on the tee, and a manual ball valve after that. Manually open the valve when the boiler is burning and close it when it stops. This will be zero cracking pressure to remove air just like the vent. May need someone else at the boiler on the phone to try this. Watch the gauge, feel the feed pipe and compare to the others in the room. See what vacuum you get there if any and if the feed pipe on this one stays warmer than the others. Won't be much vacuum and won't be for long but doesn't take much or long to pull significantly more steam over many cycles from the main.

    If steam is getting to your vent regularly you can still manually close the ball valve then too just like the vent would. Just for this experiment.

    This equipment is cheap and can be used again elsewhere. If you really want to learn about your system you need to be able to see on gauges what is happening where with the pressure +/- to visualize it properly. They really don't cost much. Try McMaster-Carr.
  • MotorapidoMotorapido Posts: 148Member
    PMJ said:

    Does that big radiator ever fill enough to close the vent anyway? Sounds like maybe not if the room is cold.

    To begin the experiment here is what I would try. 1/8 NPT pipe right? Get a nipple, a tee, a small compound vac/pressure gauge on the tee, and a manual ball valve after that. Manually open the valve when the boiler is burning and close it when it stops. This will be zero cracking pressure to remove air just like the vent. May need someone else at the boiler on the phone to try this. Watch the gauge, feel the feed pipe and compare to the others in the room. See what vacuum you get there if any and if the feed pipe on this one stays warmer than the others. Won't be much vacuum and won't be for long but doesn't take much or long to pull significantly more steam over many cycles from the main.

    If steam is getting to your vent regularly you can still manually close the ball valve then too just like the vent would. Just for this experiment.

    This equipment is cheap and can be used again elsewhere. If you really want to learn about your system you need to be able to see on gauges what is happening where with the pressure +/- to visualize it properly. They really don't cost much. Try McMaster-Carr.

    Interesting. If the experiment with the temporary gauge/tee/valve shows that I can achieve some vacuum after the boiler shuts down, how do I go about modifying my Maid-O-Mist vent? If I remove the removable orifice from the top of the vent, what part would I screw on in place of the orifice to operate as a vacuum check valve?
  • PMJPMJ Posts: 743Member

    PMJ said:

    Does that big radiator ever fill enough to close the vent anyway? Sounds like maybe not if the room is cold.

    To begin the experiment here is what I would try. 1/8 NPT pipe right? Get a nipple, a tee, a small compound vac/pressure gauge on the tee, and a manual ball valve after that. Manually open the valve when the boiler is burning and close it when it stops. This will be zero cracking pressure to remove air just like the vent. May need someone else at the boiler on the phone to try this. Watch the gauge, feel the feed pipe and compare to the others in the room. See what vacuum you get there if any and if the feed pipe on this one stays warmer than the others. Won't be much vacuum and won't be for long but doesn't take much or long to pull significantly more steam over many cycles from the main.

    If steam is getting to your vent regularly you can still manually close the ball valve then too just like the vent would. Just for this experiment.

    This equipment is cheap and can be used again elsewhere. If you really want to learn about your system you need to be able to see on gauges what is happening where with the pressure +/- to visualize it properly. They really don't cost much. Try McMaster-Carr.

    Interesting. If the experiment with the temporary gauge/tee/valve shows that I can achieve some vacuum after the boiler shuts down, how do I go about modifying my Maid-O-Mist vent? If I remove the removable orifice from the top of the vent, what part would I screw on in place of the orifice to operate as a vacuum check valve?
    I don't know what thread type is in there. You might consider a 1/8 NPT check valve in between the maid-o-mist and the rad. Either way I'd be concerned about the effect of the additional resistance of the cracking pressure of the check slowing the fill from what you have now. If that big rad never fills anyway if it were my place I'd skip the vent altogether and just work on the check. But then I'd be adding the cycle timer so I was sure it never filled. Partially filled a much higher % of the total time would be my goal. I'd be planning to keep the gauge in there no matter what I was doing to see what was going on.

    How about switching to the vent @Fizz recommended if you do see vacuum there?
  • Dave0176Dave0176 Posts: 1,018Member
    You could just install the Hoffman 62 Vacuum breaker in the basement.
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  • PMJPMJ Posts: 743Member
    They are trying to hold vacuum in one rad, not break it.
  • Mark NMark N Posts: 1,066Member
    One would think that its quite impossible to hold vacuum in just one rad. The hand valve is open to the system which is open to the atmosphere. High pressure goes to low pressure.
  • FredFred Posts: 7,610Member
    Mark N said:

    One would think that its quite impossible to hold vacuum in just one rad. The hand valve is open to the system which is open to the atmosphere. High pressure goes to low pressure.

    That was my thinking too, and if the steam never heated the rad all the way across to close the vent, in the first place, how would that work?
  • ethicalpaulethicalpaul Posts: 482Member
    Gents, I'm only trying to prevent the radiator in my bedroom from hissing at the end of a heating cycle. So the way I see it, I can:

    1. Put a check valve on just that _single vent_ (see the title of this thread and the original post) so that the vacuum is relieved from other radiators that aren't in my bedroom

    or (as suggested by a couple responses in this thread)

    2. install a vacuum break on the main so that the radiators (especially the one in my bedroom) don't have to relieve that vacuum at all.
    1 pipe Utica 112 in Cedar Grove, NJ. If you see me say something dumb, just think of my poor wife--she has to hear it every day!
  • FredFred Posts: 7,610Member
    @ethicalpaul , I understand that but, if the radiator never got hot all the way across to close the vent, it will still suck air, at the end of the cycle, or, if the system is open, I don't know that it will hold a vacuum after the heating cycle. Seems like a vacuum breaker on the main may be the better option.
  • PMJPMJ Posts: 743Member
    edited February 11
    Fred said:

    @ethicalpaul , I understand that but, if the radiator never got hot all the way across to close the vent, it will still suck air, at the end of the cycle, or, if the system is open, I don't know that it will hold a vacuum after the heating cycle. Seems like a vacuum breaker on the main may be the better option.

    Partially filled rads are bobbling right at or very slightly below atmospheric even with the boiler firing. A check valve in combination with a regular one-pipe vent or a vacuum vent assures no air from the room can enter that rad from the room when the burner goes off and kill the small vacuum forming there - ever. Instead, steam from the still full main fills that forming void always as long as the rad is condensing steam. In this way just that one rad checked this way even though no others are in a one-pipe system will get a little more steam each cycle than it would open vented. I posted the Hoffman literature that explained this. We aren't relying on a closed regular steam vent to hold vacuum which I don't think it will anyway even hot.
  • Mark NMark N Posts: 1,066Member
    edited February 11
    I would think they were talking about adding the one vacuum vent to a radiator on a system with a coal boiler. These vents had extremely slow venting rates. Most likely the rad would be colder on a system with a gas or oil fired boiler.
  • gfrbrooklinegfrbrookline Posts: 322Member
    Even with a vacuum vent I still think you are still going to hear the hissing as the pressure builds at the end of a heating cycle. You could lower your pressure to offset some of that but that might cause an imbalance in heat if you go too far down. It is my understanding that the vacuum vent works its magic after the boiler stops firing. I have a vapor system so do not have first hand knowledge.
  • PMJPMJ Posts: 743Member
    edited February 12
    Mark N said:

    One would think that its quite impossible to hold vacuum in just one rad. The hand valve is open to the system which is open to the atmosphere. High pressure goes to low pressure.

    Guys, all that needs to happen here is for the pressure in this radiator to be lower than in the main feeding it which is still filled with steam when the burner goes off. It doesn't have to be by much at all. If you simply close off the vent to the room the steam in the rad will quickly induce a pressure slightly lower than the main for a time because the steam in the main cannot condense as fast as in the rad. During that time some additional steam will flow into that rad from the main that would not do so if the vent were open to the room. We are talking about tiny pressure differences here and relatively small amounts of steam. But if it happens every cycle it does in fact add up to a significant difference.

    So we aren't "holding" vacuum. We are inducing a very slight pressure difference between this rad and the main for a time. With the vent open to the room both the rad and then the main would quickly fill with air as the steam condensed. As fast as steam condenses both in the rad and the main, the room is higher pressure than both and with an open vent air fills the void created quickly. That air is working against us, not for us.

    Somehow I have got to get more folks to experience a system totally closed off to the atmosphere when the burner goes off. Steam will still be generated for a time at the boiler, steam will still be flowing from the boiler through the mains to the rads. The feed pipes to the rads stay noticeably warmer. You squeeze more steam out of the boiler through the mains and into the rads each and every firing than could possibly happen open vented. This phenomenon has absolutely nothing to do with venting. It has nothing to do with coal fires. During this time all vents, whatever kind they are, simply need to be closed and keep air from going in. When you do this the lowest pressure in the system is in the rads by one or two inches of water compared to the header(I've measured it). The flow in the system remains in forward motion from boiler to the rads.
  • ethicalpaulethicalpaul Posts: 482Member
    I’m gonna try some stuff, this is too interesting
    1 pipe Utica 112 in Cedar Grove, NJ. If you see me say something dumb, just think of my poor wife--she has to hear it every day!
  • FredFred Posts: 7,610Member

    I’m gonna try some stuff, this is too interesting

    Good! We can theorize forever. I'd like to see some actual results.
  • PMJPMJ Posts: 743Member
    > @ethicalpaul said:
    > I’m gonna try some stuff, this is too interesting

    Great. That is what is needed. I'm not theorizing about it in 2 pipe. Been living it for years now and wouldn't think of running any other way.

    Please do try some stuff. Put the nipple/tee/gauge/valve between a rad and a current vent. Start with a +/- 5 inches water gauge and see if anything happens differently on the gauge when the burner goes off valve open vs valve closed. Won't be much but doesn't need to be.
  • FriendlyFredFriendlyFred Posts: 27Member
    I'm a little late to the party, but I previously searched around for an ultra-low cracking pressure check valve, and found a potential solution from a company that makes hardware for medical applications.

    https://www.generant.com/product/disc-check-valve-dcv/

    Listed cracking pressure as little as 1 inch of water (.036 PSI).

    Based on the spec sheet, a part ID that might be best for this application is DCV-125B-V - representing a Brass disc check valve with 1/8" female connections and a Viton disc.

    ===

    Another wild idea one of you guys could capitalize on is the use of electronically controlled ball valves in conjunction with a thermal switch.

    This is definitely a 'roll your own' situation...but you could manufacture a setup using something like: https://ussolid.com/compare/717/712/711/710

    Multiple operating modes available (look for number of wires) that range from 'auto close on power loss' to 5 wire setups to report on status of valve.

    Throw in a static, adjustable, or programmable thermal switch to control the valve operation. Maybe throw in some local RF control operating modes via an automation/centralized location.

    Maybe if you were reaallly inventive, you could throw in a small 'exit light backup batteries' and a Peltier junction on your steam line to act as a 'trickle charger'.

    Expensive, yes...but you could probably get it down to the cost of replacing everything with specialized old-stock vacuum vents.

    ===







  • PMJPMJ Posts: 743Member
    @FriendlyFred , thanks for this. Good stuff. Who sells the Generant stuff? They have a 1/8 x 1/8 female check I'd like to experiment with. If I had a one pipe system I'd be putting one in between a vent and a rad to try.
  • ethicalpaulethicalpaul Posts: 482Member
    Yeah agreement here. The most likely one I have found so far was from US Plastics but it has a cracking pressure of .3psi which I was not a fan of!

    Funny how this Generant one has a max temperature of 210F. It's like they purposely don't want people to try it with steam (not that that would stop me LOL)
    1 pipe Utica 112 in Cedar Grove, NJ. If you see me say something dumb, just think of my poor wife--she has to hear it every day!
  • BobCBobC Posts: 4,909Member
    It would be interesting to know the long term effect of steam on that valve. It will see steam temperatures but not for very long. I'd try putting it up on a 1 or 2" nipple and see how that works.

    Bob
    Smith G8-3 with EZ Gas @ 90,000 BTU, Single pipe steam
    Vaporstat with a 12oz cut-out and 4oz cut-in
    3PSI gauge
  • PMJPMJ Posts: 743Member
    BobC said:

    It would be interesting to know the long term effect of steam on that valve. It will see steam temperatures but not for very long. I'd try putting it up on a 1 or 2" nipple and see how that works.

    Bob

    When you employ the duty cycle approach you can run rads much less full for much longer periods. My two pipe traps never see steam. I think the same is quite possible with one pipe vents.
  • FriendlyFredFriendlyFred Posts: 27Member
    @PMJ

    Physical properties of Viton and other fluorinated elastomers accommodate much higher temperatures, and for much longer.

    The spec sheet notes the following:
    Compounds of Viton™ remain substantially elastic indefinitely when exposed to laboratory air oven aging up to 204 °C
    (399 °F).

    High temperature service limits are generally
    considered to be:
    – 3,000 hr at 232 °C (450 °F)
    – 1,000 hr at 260 °C (500 °F)
    – 240 hr at 288 °C (550 °F)
    – 48 hr at 316 °C (601 °F)

    In this case, the material can take the heat, and the temperature limit set by Generant is probably a combination of a) safety margin, b) intended applications, or c) under a threshold where their primary industry requires different testing processes for steam rating.
  • mikeg2015mikeg2015 Posts: 575Member
    Rated for steam and seems to crack at less than .
    PMJ said:

    PMJ said:

    Does that big radiator ever fill enough to close the vent anyway? Sounds like maybe not if the room is cold.

    To begin the experiment here is what I would try. 1/8 NPT pipe right? Get a nipple, a tee, a small compound vac/pressure gauge on the tee, and a manual ball valve after that. Manually open the valve when the boiler is burning and close it when it stops. This will be zero cracking pressure to remove air just like the vent. May need someone else at the boiler on the phone to try this. Watch the gauge, feel the feed pipe and compare to the others in the room. See what vacuum you get there if any and if the feed pipe on this one stays warmer than the others. Won't be much vacuum and won't be for long but doesn't take much or long to pull significantly more steam over many cycles from the main.

    If steam is getting to your vent regularly you can still manually close the ball valve then too just like the vent would. Just for this experiment.

    This equipment is cheap and can be used again elsewhere. If you really want to learn about your system you need to be able to see on gauges what is happening where with the pressure +/- to visualize it properly. They really don't cost much. Try McMaster-Carr.

    Interesting. If the experiment with the temporary gauge/tee/valve shows that I can achieve some vacuum after the boiler shuts down, how do I go about modifying my Maid-O-Mist vent? If I remove the removable orifice from the top of the vent, what part would I screw on in place of the orifice to operate as a vacuum check valve?
    I don't know what thread type is in there. You might consider a 1/8 NPT check valve in between the maid-o-mist and the rad. Either way I'd be concerned about the effect of the additional resistance of the cracking pressure of the check slowing the fill from what you have now. If that big rad never fills anyway if it were my place I'd skip the vent altogether and just work on the check. But then I'd be adding the cycle timer so I was sure it never filled. Partially filled a much higher % of the total time would be my goal. I'd be planning to keep the gauge in there no matter what I was doing to see what was going on.

    How about switching to the vent @Fizz recommended if you do see vacuum there?

    It’s 10-32 threads. I ordered a tap thinking I might have to modify something but think I might find a check valve that will work. Or I might just install a right angle fitting and run polytubing (MoM vent will stop steam from entering tubing so no high temp requirements) and run the small tubing back to the basement to a manifold at the boiler where I can connect it to a check valve and possibly a receiver and vacuum pump. Wonder if you can build a vacuum pump with poppet valves and a steel receiver. Steam goes in, condenses as air around it cools and creates a vacuum, and you drain off the condensate.
  • PMJPMJ Posts: 743Member



    mikeg2015 said:



    It’s 10-32 threads. I ordered a tap thinking I might have to modify something but think I might find a check valve that will work. Or I might just install a right angle fitting and run polytubing (MoM vent will stop steam from entering tubing so no high temp requirements) and run the small tubing back to the basement to a manifold at the boiler where I can connect it to a check valve and possibly a receiver and vacuum pump. Wonder if you can build a vacuum pump with poppet valves and a steel receiver. Steam goes in, condenses as air around it cools and creates a vacuum, and you drain off the condensate.

    In that case you can get one touch tube fittings with 10-32 threads and push connect the plastic tube straight to the MOM.

    Tubes back to the basement is what I would be thinking about if I had one pipe. Once installed there would be many more control possibilities than two pipe.

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