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Electric Radiant Boilers

Hey there to everyone.

I am looking for recommendations on electric radiant boilers. It will be powered by 208 volt 3 phase (wye) and will require 125,000 btu output.

(Before you recommend a different energy source...we only pay 2.7 cents per kilowatt hour)

Thanks in advance, Alan

Comments

  • Steve Minnich
    Steve Minnich Member Posts: 2,758
    http://www.electromn.com/gen/boilers.htm

    Check these out. I've used them in remote locations and liked them.
    Steve Minnich
    Minnich Hydronic Consulting & Design, LLC
    [email protected]
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 16,327
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
  • winesalot
    winesalot Member Posts: 32
    They both look like good options. Thank you.

    Any thoughts on the Slantfin units? http://www.slantfin.com/products/monitron-eh-boiler/
  • Harvey Ramer
    Harvey Ramer Member Posts: 2,221
    Is your power Wye or delta?
    The slantfin units are nice, but they run on Wye and the largest model only has a little over 100,000 btu output with 208 volts.
  • winesalot
    winesalot Member Posts: 32
    Is there a source that will sell these boilers online?
    http://www.electromn.com/gen/boilers.htm
    http://www.thermo2000.com/index_en.aspx

    I am running in to the standard protectionist BS..."We only sell complete systems" or "We only sell to contractors" or if it's the manufacturer, "We only sell through distributors"
  • GroundUp
    GroundUp Member Posts: 1,406
    I buy a lot of Electro factory direct as they are only 40 miles from my house and provide better support than the local distributors do anyway, but there are a couple decent online suppliers I've had good luck with in the past. Just type the model number into the Google search bar and you'll find what you need
  • winesalot
    winesalot Member Posts: 32

    Is your power Wye or delta?

    The slantfin units are nice, but they run on Wye and the largest model only has a little over 100,000 btu output with 208 volts.

    Wye
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 16,327
    winesalot said:

    Is there a source that will sell these boilers online?
    http://www.electromn.com/gen/boilers.htm
    http://www.thermo2000.com/index_en.aspx

    I am running in to the standard protectionist BS..."We only sell complete systems" or "We only sell to contractors" or if it's the manufacturer, "We only sell through distributors"

    Thermo 2000 at Menards. maybe not all the models however. A 3 phase is probably a special order. Look up the rep in your area and ask for dealer info.

    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
  • Zman
    Zman Member Posts: 7,330
    I am a little puzzled by the Delta vs Wye conversation. I am under the impression that most US systems are either 3 phase Wye (120/208 or 277/480) or split single phase (120/240).

    3 phase Delta is more common in industrial applications and involves concepts like corner grounding, sine approach angles and other things that give me a headache thinking about.
    Perhaps @Jamie Hall could explain it better....
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 18,966
    You are an optimist, @Zman ! Almost all North American systems are three phase Y, and your voltages are correct: the 120 or 277 is any single phase to neutral, and the 208 or 480 is between phases. And there is a neutral as well as a ground. Three phase delta doesn't have a neutral (there is a ground) and the phase to phase voltage is usually 240 by the time it gets into any normal switchboard. The split single phase which is the normal house connection is taken from either one by a transformer (which may be either phase to ground from a Y main line or phase to phase from a delta main line -- you'd have to ask the power company, but the former is more common) which has a center tapped neutral and ground). Converting one to the other is no big deal -- but does require transformers.

    The reason Y is used is that unbalanced loads on the phases don't matter, assuming that the neutral is intact. Delta tends to get squirrely if the loads on the phases aren't very very close to the same.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
    Zman
  • ratio
    ratio Member Posts: 3,185
    What, no mention of 3Φ 4 wire Δ, @Jamie Hall? :smiley:

    Think of a 120/240 V can with two 240 V cans closing the triangle. The best thing about this setup is the wild leg, the phase that's directly opposite the neutral tap on the 120/240 V can. Through the miracle of physics, it runs at around 208 V to ground! (Not as uncommon around here as one might hope.) The best tell is a panel with every 3rd space open or a multi-pole breaker.

    Then there's the open delta service, which is just what it sounds like, three phases with only two transformers. I have actually seen one of these in the wild.

  • Harvey Ramer
    Harvey Ramer Member Posts: 2,221
    I work on more 3 phase delta than Wye in these parts. It's not bad when you are used to it. You just have to pay attention to the high led. Particularly on CNC equipment, or any equipment with electronic controls.
    ratio