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In need of suggestions replacing an Weil McLain EG 65 steam boiler

RCooper
RCooper Member Posts: 8
Greetings Any suggestions on what direction I should go in replacing my Weil McLain EG 65 steam boiler? My house is about 2800 sq feet and I am in NE Ohio. I have
also taken a few pics of my current boiler. I am starting from ground zero since I don't really know anything about boilers but I want to get the right boiler at a fair price.




Comments

  • delcrossv
    delcrossv Member Posts: 677
    What's wrong with the current one that you want to replace it?
    Trying to squeeze the best out of a Weil-McLain JB-5 running a 1912 1 pipe system.
    EdTheHeaterManCanucker
  • realliveplumber
    realliveplumber Member Posts: 350
    Make sure that the installer pipes it according to the manufacturer's installation instructions.

    Not the way it is piped now. Which is incorrect.
    ethicalpaul
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 22,918
    Actually I would have said the current piping isn't bad at all, except that the steam main should come off after the right hand riser rather than before it, so the sequence from left to right would be riser, riser, steam main, equalizer.

    I especially like the location of the pressure gauge and the pressuretrol. I wish more boilers were piped that way.

    I too wonder what is the matter with the current boiler that you feel a need to replace it. In any case, if there really is a need to replace it, find someone who will size it properly. Steam boilers are sized on the basis of the number and size of the radiators they power, not on the size of the house.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
    EdTheHeaterManRCooper
  • EdTheHeaterMan
    EdTheHeaterMan Member Posts: 7,567
    Just move the boiler over about a foot and put the steam riser here
    If you believe a new boiler will lower your operating cost. stop thinking that. Steam is different than Hot Water boilers that are inefficient. Your new boiler will cost about the same to operate as the one in this picture.

    So if your boiler is not leaking or has other major problems, all you really need is a good steam boiler man to adjust and maintain it properly. A new boiler will not solve problems with the rest of the system. if your radiators are having problems, then you need to address those problems.

    Why do you think you need a new boiler?
    Edward F Young. Retired HVAC ContractorSpecialized in Residential Oil Burner and Hydronics
    realliveplumberdelcrossvRCooper
  • EdTheHeaterMan
    EdTheHeaterMan Member Posts: 7,567
    edited February 4
    Sorry I cant help it

    In need of suggestions replacing an Weil McLain EG 65 steam boiler

    You can look at this model from a company out of Michigan City Indiana.
    https://www.weil-mclain.com/products/eg-series-6-gas-boiler

    Edward F Young. Retired HVAC ContractorSpecialized in Residential Oil Burner and Hydronics
    RCooper
  • pecmsg
    pecmsg Member Posts: 4,695
    edited February 4
    Changing the boiler will save you pennies if done properly. 

  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 16,726
    @RCooper , I agree you would need a good reason to replace it. But if you want a real good set of eyes on it, look no further:

    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/g-w-gill-plumbing-and-heating
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    Towson, MD, USA
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Consulting
    MikeAmann
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 15,322
    The guy that did it originally made a mistake but did a beautiful job. It's obvious he knew how to put pipe together and he used flange unions which never leak. Except for the riser in the wrong place, it's a Cadilliac job.
    delcrossv
  • tim smith
    tim smith Member Posts: 2,738
    I agree, it is a good looking pipe up except for the indiscretion of main takeoff between the boiler risers.
  • RCooper
    RCooper Member Posts: 8
    delcrossv said:

    What's wrong with the current one that you want to replace it?

    I had a carbon monoxide leak soot was blocking carbon monoxide that was supposed to go through my chimney and it ended up in my basement causing my detector to alarm. I had 2 contractors out and was told the following " Heat exchanger on both sides on top has cracks and is leaking steam causing heat exchange to rust and soot right side in back is bad not repairable unit needs to be replaced" Sorry for the grammar I am typing exactly whats on invoice.
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 22,918
    edited February 5
    How much water are you adding to the boiler, and how often? I can see heavy sooting causing problems -- such as poor draughting and back draughts into the basement, but... that may also be caused by inadequate maintenance.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • RCooper
    RCooper Member Posts: 8
    Steamhead said:

    @RCooper , I agree you would need a good reason to replace it. But if you want a real good set of eyes on it, look no further:

    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/g-w-gill-plumbing-and-heating

    I was told by 2 contractors boiler was leaking via cracks on both sides causing rust and soot which caused carbon monoxide to leak in my basement. I will call the contractor you recommended first thin tomorrow. thanks!
  • pecmsg
    pecmsg Member Posts: 4,695
    edited February 5
    RCooper said:
    What's wrong with the current one that you want to replace it?
    I had a carbon monoxide leak soot was blocking carbon monoxide that was supposed to go through my chimney and it ended up in my basement causing my detector to alarm. I had 2 contractors out and was told the following " Heat exchanger on both sides on top has cracks and is leaking steam causing heat exchange to rust and soot right side in back is bad not repairable unit needs to be replaced" Sorry for the grammar I am typing exactly whats on invoice.
    1 st:
    UL Approved CO detectors DO NOT alarm until 70 PPM of CO has been detected for UP TO 4 hours. 
    They are virtually worthless. 
    Every home should have at least 2 NON UL approved Low Level CO detectors. 
  • RCooper
    RCooper Member Posts: 8

    How much water are you adding to the boiler, and how often? I can see heavy sooting causing problems -- such as poor draughting and back draughts into the basement, but... that may also be caused by inadequate maintenance.

    I didnt know i was suppossed to add water to the boiler. Yes there is heavy sooting I was told it was due to 2 cracks on both sides of the heat exchanger leaking steamm causing heat exchanger to rust and soot...
  • RCooper
    RCooper Member Posts: 8
    edited February 5
    pecmsg said:


    RCooper said:

    What's wrong with the current one that you want to replace it?
    I had a carbon monoxide leak soot was blocking carbon monoxide that was supposed to go through my chimney and it ended up in my basement causing my detector to alarm. I had 2 contractors out and was told the following " Heat exchanger on both sides on top has cracks and is leaking steam causing heat exchange to rust and soot right side in back is bad not repairable unit needs to be replaced" Sorry for the grammar I am typing exactly whats on invoice.

    1 st:
    UL Approved CO detectors DO NOT alarm until 70 PPM of CO has been detected for UP TO 4 hours. 
    They are virtually worthless. 
    Every home should have at least 2 NON UL approved Low Level CO detectors. 


    Thanks for the info
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 22,918
    RCooper said:

    How much water are you adding to the boiler, and how often? I can see heavy sooting causing problems -- such as poor draughting and back draughts into the basement, but... that may also be caused by inadequate maintenance.

    I didnt know i was suppossed to add water to the boiler. Yes there is heavy sooting I was told it was due to 2 cracks on both sides of the heat exchanger leaking steamm causing heat exchanger to rust and soot...
    I think you need a different opinion. Unless your boiler has an autofeeder on it -- which it might (pictures are always helpful) -- and you aren't adding water you don't have a steam leak. Period.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
    RCooper
  • RCooper
    RCooper Member Posts: 8
    How much water are you adding to the boiler, and how often? I can see heavy sooting causing problems -- such as poor draughting and back draughts into the basement, but... that may also be caused by inadequate maintenance.
    I didnt know i was suppossed to add water to the boiler. Yes there is heavy sooting I was told it was due to 2 cracks on both sides of the heat exchanger leaking steamm causing heat exchanger to rust and soot...
    I think you need a different opinion. Unless your boiler has an autofeeder on it -- which it might (pictures are always helpful) -- and you aren't adding water you don't have a steam leak. Period.
    How much water are you adding to the boiler, and how often? I can see heavy sooting causing problems -- such as poor draughting and back draughts into the basement, but... that may also be caused by inadequate maintenance.
    I didnt know i was suppossed to add water to the boiler. Yes there is heavy sooting I was told it was due to 2 cracks on both sides of the heat exchanger leaking steamm causing heat exchanger to rust and soot...
    I think you need a different opinion. Unless your boiler has an autofeeder on it -- which it might (pictures are always helpful) -- and you aren't adding water you don't have a steam leak. Period.
    Yes I reached out the contractor in my area someone recommended in one of the above replies will have them out for a second opinion. 
  • EdTheHeaterMan
    EdTheHeaterMan Member Posts: 7,567
    edited February 6

    RCooper said:

    How much water are you adding to the boiler, and how often? I can see heavy sooting causing problems -- such as poor draughting and back draughts into the basement, but... that may also be caused by inadequate maintenance.

    I didnt know i was suppossed to add water to the boiler. Yes there is heavy sooting I was told it was due to 2 cracks on both sides of the heat exchanger leaking steamm causing heat exchanger to rust and soot...
    I think you need a different opinion. Unless your boiler has an autofeeder on it -- which it might (pictures are always helpful) -- and you aren't adding water you don't have a steam leak. Period.

    This boiler has the old McDonald Miller #47-2 LWCO with water feeder built in to the LWCO linkage. So he has a automatic feeder. The next thing the OP needs to know is that the #47-2 LWCO needs to be flushed once a week. If no one was doing that, then there is a good chance there is a crack in the boiler if it ever fired when the water was too low and the LWCO was full of mud.

    Edward F Young. Retired HVAC ContractorSpecialized in Residential Oil Burner and Hydronics
    RCooper
  • pedmec
    pedmec Member Posts: 928
    Flood the boiler. If you have a crack your gonna see it.
    EdTheHeaterManRCooper
  • delcrossv
    delcrossv Member Posts: 677
    Hiring Mr Gill is a good first step. You should also read this book:

    https://heatinghelp.com/store/detail/we-got-steam-heat-a-homeowners-guide-to-peaceful-coexistence
    Trying to squeeze the best out of a Weil-McLain JB-5 running a 1912 1 pipe system.
  • RCooper
    RCooper Member Posts: 8
    delcrossv said:
    Hiring Mr Gill is a good first step. You should also read this book: https://heatinghelp.com/store/detail/we-got-steam-heat-a-homeowners-guide-to-peaceful-coexistence
    Will do thanks! 
  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 16,726
    RCooper said:

    Steamhead said:

    @RCooper , I agree you would need a good reason to replace it. But if you want a real good set of eyes on it, look no further:

    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/g-w-gill-plumbing-and-heating

    I was told by 2 contractors boiler was leaking via cracks on both sides causing rust and soot which caused carbon monoxide to leak in my basement. I will call the contractor you recommended first thin tomorrow. thanks!
    If the boiler has leaked enough that the flue passages have filled with rust, and that's causing the sooting, it's toast. We just had two of these situations, and replaced both of them.
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    Towson, MD, USA
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Consulting
  • RCooper
    RCooper Member Posts: 8
    delcrossv said:
    Hiring Mr Gill is a good first step. You should also read this book: https://heatinghelp.com/store/detail/we-got-steam-heat-a-homeowners-guide-to-peaceful-coexistence
    Will do thanks!