Welcome! Here are the website rules, as well as some tips for using this forum.
Need to contact us? Visit https://heatinghelp.com/contact-us/.
Click here to Find a Contractor in your area.

What is this?

dennisba
dennisba Member Posts: 2
This thing is on a steam boiler that does not have a Hartford Loop nor return lines. from looking on wall, realized it is a counter flow system. If I decide to take the job, I will do it the Steve Gronsky way, which I saw on the wall.
Mad Dog_2

Comments

  • Long Beach Ed
    Long Beach Ed Member Posts: 1,202
    edited March 2023
    Looks like an anti-surge tank which dries the steam. Last time I looked, a few small places still made these.
    kcoppMad Dog_2bburd
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 11,060
    IIRC, it could be a water/steam separator.

    Have seen something like that here on the wall some time ago.
    Long Beach EdMad Dog_2
  • Mad Dog_2
    Mad Dog_2 Member Posts: 6,920
    edited March 2023
    I've cut a few out Sears and 'Monkey-Wards" made some thing similar.  As Scott said..unnecessary.   mad Dog
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,525
    They do work. It contains a dip tube for the steam. The wide space in the road seriously slows the steam velocity as it leaves the boiler. There’s little carryover. 
    Retired and loving it.
    Mad Dog_2
  • Mad Dog_2
    Mad Dog_2 Member Posts: 6,920
    I'm sure, but wouldn't a good full port drop header do the same, Dr Holohan? (Professor Emeritus of The Steam and all Hydronics).  If I cut it out, its at Suffolk County Community College Heating Museum where all my Larger relics have their final resting place.   I know Prof. Eugene runs things out in California.  Who in charge there now Dan?  I have a few "new" older items I WILL NEVER junk... Mad Dog
    Long Beach Ed
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,525
    It does what a drop-header does, Matt, and at less expense. These devices are from the '80s and they helped when the steam boilers were really hot-water boilers, trimmed for steam usage. The steam velocity of those boilers was much too high and the separator slowed the steam significantly. They were more popular in New England than in NY.

    I don't have any contacts at Suffolk Community College. I saw Eugene at AHR. He's looking good.
    Retired and loving it.
    Mad Dog_2
  • SeanBeans
    SeanBeans Member Posts: 520
    I believe I saw these in Dan's book, TLAOSH
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,525
    Yes
    Retired and loving it.
  • Mad Dog_2
    Mad Dog_2 Member Posts: 6,920
    Dano.  I'm going to reach out to Suffolk CC and pay a visit to review what they have on display and reestablish a connection with them and see if they want more artifacts  mad Dog 
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,525
    Nice! Thanks. 
    Retired and loving it.
  • dennisba
    dennisba Member Posts: 2
    Thanks for the feed back guys. I knew I would get the answer on this site! I sent a photo to a few of my suppliers, but no one could tell me what it was. Thank you Mr. Dan Holohan for your class, books and articles which have helped our little outfit do steam better.
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,525
    I'm glad I was able to help. Thanks!
    Retired and loving it.
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 15,670

    They do work. It contains a dip tube for the steam. The wide space in the road seriously slows the steam velocity as it leaves the boiler. There’s little carryover. 

    Since the carry over happens in the boiler where it gets pulled into the narrow tapping, that would mean that water is entering the device.

    Where does this water drain back out from the device?



    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,525
    The globe is hollow, except for a dip tube that extends about halfway in from the top. The carryover water falls right back into the boiler as the steam enters the dip tube and heads up into the system. It's very simple. Devices such as this one have been around for more than 100 years. They reappeared during the '80s because the steam boilers of that time were really hot-water boilers, trimmed for steam.
    Retired and loving it.
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 15,670

    The globe is hollow, except for a dip tube that extends about halfway in from the top. The carryover water falls right back into the boiler as the steam enters the dip tube and heads up into the system. It's very simple. Devices such as this one have been around for more than 100 years. They reappeared during the '80s because the steam boilers of that time were really hot-water boilers, trimmed for steam.

    I wish someone had a patent drawing or something.
    I'm having a hard time picturing it. :(
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
    reggi
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,525
    Retired and loving it.
  • ScottSecor
    ScottSecor Member Posts: 855
    @ChrisJ did you click on the link I provided above?
    ChrisJ
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,525
    Thanks, Scott. 
    Retired and loving it.
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 15,670

    @ChrisJ did you click on the link I provided above?

    I didn't even notice it among all of the other posts, I'm sorry Scott.
    That's exactly what I needed to see.


    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • jumper
    jumper Member Posts: 2,246

    It does what a drop-header does, Matt, and at less expense. These devices are from the '80s and they helped when the steam boilers were really hot-water boilers, trimmed for steam usage. The steam velocity of those boilers was much too high and the separator slowed the steam significantly. They were more popular in New England than in NY.

    I don't have any contacts at Suffolk Community College. I saw Eugene at AHR. He's looking good.

    Steam drums and separators are a good idea. I believe some systems used flash tanks & separators in returns as well.
  • Long Beach Ed
    Long Beach Ed Member Posts: 1,202
    Think it's cheaper than a drop header?
    dennis53ethicalpaul
  • Hap_Hazzard
    Hap_Hazzard Member Posts: 2,846

    It's cheaper than a drop header, but it returns carryover to the boiler via the riser where it can interfere with the release of steam at the surface instead of sending it through the equalizer where it enters the boiler below the water line. Not sure if the reduction in efficiency would be significant, but there would be some.

    Just another DIYer | King of Prussia, PA
    1983(?) Peerless G-561-W-S | 3" drop header, CG400-1090, VXT-24
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,525

    As Gil Carlson would say, "A difference, to be a difference, has to make a difference." 😉

    Retired and loving it.
    Hap_Hazzard
  • Hap_Hazzard
    Hap_Hazzard Member Posts: 2,846

    As my Dad used to say, "a trivial inequality." He was a mathematician. It's not hereditary.

    Just another DIYer | King of Prussia, PA
    1983(?) Peerless G-561-W-S | 3" drop header, CG400-1090, VXT-24