Click here to Find a Contractor in your area.
Welcome! Here are the website rules, as well as some tips for using this forum.

If you've found help here, check back in to let us know how everything worked out.
It's a great way to thank those who helped you.
Need to contact us? Visit https://heatinghelp.com/contact-us/.

Plumbing and Is this going to pass electrical inspection ?

SynwaySynway Member Posts: 44
Hey there, thanks for all the professional input on this journey I’m taking. If your new to my hydronic heating venture I've got 5 other posts To get here.
B ).
I’m Calling today to get estimates to “differently” hook up my “now” new IBC combo plant.
But my confidence level to deal with this contractor and my situation needs specific things to calmly ( I don’t want to go to jail) get a fair price for what is in my house.
Then I’ll get an estimate to take the job over.
I am well enough to do a tear down to a specific point so a new quote can be accepted.

In Ontario Canada, can you put the main power switch near close to this safety device?
is it supposed to be red?


Comments

  • pecmsgpecmsg Member Posts: 1,421
    edited June 15
    I don't consider a Air Vent as a Safety Device!
  • ZmanZman Member Posts: 5,827
    edited June 15
    You are going to need to dig into your local or Canadian codes on this one. If a service disconnect is all that is required, that will probably work. If the code requires an EPO (emergency switch), that is not going to work at all.
    I don't like having the switch that close to something that can discharge water, I do't know of a code that it violates.
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
    Intplm.Synway
  • Intplm.Intplm. Member Posts: 1,158
    That should be a convenience outlet and switch in that box.

    Some require a switch at , say the stairs heading down to the basement as a off switch for use in the event of an emergency. This is sometimes required for gas, or oil fired boilers. But some would not require them.
    Best that you contact your building inspector for the requirements in your area.
    Synway
  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Member Posts: 12,847
    As @Zman and @Intplm. have said, you're pretty well going to have to look at your local code -- I'm pretty sure that Toronto and Lakefield are going to be rather different!, just to pick two -- never mind say Kenora -- and ask your local "authority having jurisdiction", whoever that may be.

    That said, I'd not have been happy with it. Too much of a chance of getting water into it, in my view. But that's me, and years ago, and Vermont...
    Br. Jamie, osb

    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.

    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • CanuckerCanucker Member Posts: 611
    @Synway you're fine for that switch. It's not violating any ESA standards for Ontario that I'm aware of. The colour doesn't have any bearing on it. P.S Knight publishes simplified versions of the code book if you're interested in reading up on it
    You can have it good, fast or cheap. Pick two
    Synway
  • lchmblchmb Member Posts: 2,989
    the pressure relief valve should not lay down in the direction it is. Last time I installed the IBC it had a street 90 for the pressure relief valve so curious why he put a tee on there...
    kcopp
  • EBEBRATT-EdEBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 7,041
    @Synway

    I do not think any code will allow wood to be in contact with the boiler jacket. Check the boiler clearances from combustables
    Synway
  • pecmsgpecmsg Member Posts: 1,421

    @Synway

    I do not think any code will allow wood to be in contact with the boiler jacket. Check the boiler clearances from combustables

    Along with NO fire protection on the ceiling.
  • mattmia2mattmia2 Member Posts: 1,297
    Intplm. said:

    That should be a convenience outlet and switch in that box.

    In most jurisdictions the requirement is that there be a convenience outlet within a certain distance of the equipment. Typically it is provided in the same outlet box as the disconnect but it doesn't have to be that way as long as the requirement is met.
    Intplm.
  • ZmanZman Member Posts: 5,827
    I don't believe the clearance is addressed in the IRC, IBC, or IMC.
    In a residential setting, the bare wood would be "legal" but considered poor practice (unless the appliance I&O forbid it) where I work.
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
  • EBEBRATT-EdEBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 7,041
    edited June 16
    I doubt there are any boiler mfg's that would allow wood in contact with the boiler jacket.

    Regarding a receptacle for service the code says within 25' of the appliance and it's not supposed to be fed from the appliance circuit

    Protection on the ceiling: At one time MA required 5/8 sheetrock 4' in every direction from the center of the boiler or furnace (oil only)

    Luckily they gave up on that idea and never really enforced it it was almost impossible to do on a replacemnet. One fire marshal told me "that won't keep the house from burning down"

    Other jurisdictions may require it, don't know
  • EdTheHeaterManEdTheHeaterMan Member Posts: 572
    edited June 16

    @Synway

    I do not think any code will allow wood to be in contact with the boiler jacket. Check the boiler clearances from combustables

    That looks like a wall-hung boiler. I believe that you can place plywood on the wall in order to have a substantial base to screw the mounting bracket. The construction of the rear portion of the jacket provides for the minimum clearance when attaching to wooden supports such as the wall studs. These same boilers have minimum clearance to combustible from the front and sides as little as 1.3 CM 13.0 MM or 1/2" Your actual boiler clearance may vary
  • CanuckerCanucker Member Posts: 611
    edited June 17

    @Synway

    I do not think any code will allow wood to be in contact with the boiler jacket. Check the boiler clearances from combustables

    That looks like a wall-hung boiler. I believe that you can place plywood on the wall in order to have a substantial base to screw the mounting bracket. The construction of the rear portion of the jacket provides for the minimum clearance when attaching to wooden supports such as the wall studs. These same boilers have minimum clearance to combustible from the front and sides as little as 1.3 CM 13.0 MM or 1/2" Your actual boiler clearance may vary
    It is a wall hung boiler IBC 15-96 if I remember the previous thread. This installation is in Ontario, Canada, where I am based. Mass. code has no bearing. @Synway your switch will be fine and most likely you don't need to add anything for a fire break but I couldn't tell you from the limited pictures. As some of the other posters have mentioned, there are a couple of things that aren't very well planned but it seems to be in line with the other work your plumber is doing. None of us have liked much of what he's installing.
    You can have it good, fast or cheap. Pick two
    Synway
  • EdTheHeaterManEdTheHeaterMan Member Posts: 572
    I just looked at your previous posts. I believe it is time to look for a new contractor. Since you don't need the heat for the summer, take some time to stop by the supply houses that sells that brand of boiler. Talk to the manager of the branch or owner of the location. (The guy in charge).

    Tell him your concerns, bring pictures, and see if he can recommend a contractor. He might be apprehensive if the current plumber is his customer. Try to keep the contractor's name out of the conversation. The supply house managers/ owners know which of their customers do good work. Those contractors don't call them with constant problems.

    Those contractors also go to the classes offered to keep up with the new product offerings. Once you get a name or two, then you can call them for estimates to do it right!

    Just an idea.

    Don't give the original plumber any more money. once the job is done you can determine if the original plumber should be paid any additional based upon your losses in the re-do.
    Canuckermattmia2SuperTechSynway
  • SynwaySynway Member Posts: 44
    @EdTheHeaterMan thanks for your input. I am going to ask one more question of the members of this site and draw up an official termination for the original contractor.
    I have not given the contractor more than the cost of the boiler so I will owe him a bit more for pumps and other stuff I will use and keep. I just need to take inventory and price it.
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!