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Can someone please tell me if this Barometric Damper is oriented the correct way?

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Comments

  • rccrfanrccrfan Posts: 51Member
    edited February 14
    They don't. I called the oil company I use for maintenance and asked if the damper needs the weight adjusted and he also said that the draft wouldn't have changed enough to warrant paying for a service call.
    My neighbor has a Testo, I'm gonna have him check the combustion and draft etc.

    The previous config. was out of the boiler then a 90 degree elbow then the damper , then another 90 degree elbow and into the flue.

    As it is now, the second 90 degree is now a 45 slight offset elbow and connected to the SS liner T
  • rccrfanrccrfan Posts: 51Member
    True, but as they say , **** rolls downhill from homeowner -> Owner -> Technician.

  • ChrisJChrisJ Posts: 10,503Member

    Not sure how it’s the kid’s fault. Sounds like some licensed boomer isn’t training or supervising his workers properly.



    Or did every 20-year old in the 1960s just show up for work knowing everything? 😅

    I don't know how a 20 year old has 10 years of working experience in the US. I'm a bit confused by that one.

    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • EBEBRATT-EdEBEBRATT-Ed Posts: 6,557Member
    The chimney guy probably doesn't know what a barometric damper is or does and certainly isn't going to do a combustion test
  • rick in Alaskarick in Alaska Posts: 987Member
    pecmsg said:

    PVC on the relief valve?

    I can't tell if that is pvc on the relief, or cpvc. Cpvc should be ok in most codes.
    Rick
  • neilcneilc Posts: 791Member

    The chimney guy probably doesn't know what a barometric damper is or does and certainly isn't going to do a combustion test

    yeah, this right here,
    It's trade coordination, or lack of,
    chimney boss should have advised that burner would need adjusting, if chimney boss even knows,
    and burner guy should have gladly accepted the opportunity to come and service that burner when you called, guess he don't know either,
    My real rant is the building, where the wall trade doesn't connect to the roof trade, and the window trade doesn't connect to the wall trade, and even the wall trade doesn't connect their corners to the adjacent wall, or next building assembly , , ,
    what's a building envelope?!
    thankyou, I'm done.
  • SuperTechSuperTech Posts: 1,164Member
    Ha! I had a customer with a Smith Boiler, it was installed without a barometric damper and the draft was super high. I had to make the homeowner dig up his installation manual to show him that it was supposed to be installed with a barometric damper. The boiler and chimney were packed with soot. I cleaned the boiler, installed the barometric damper and recommended a quality chimney sweep company to clean the chimney. I told him to have me back after the chimney was swept to have me recheck the boiler and clean if necessary.....

    I came back to find out the owner called a different chimney sweep company and they installed a liner rather than sweep the chimney, and the re-did my flue pipe and removed the barometric damper and sealed the flue pipe connections with what appears to be furnace cement! Stating "it's supposed to be a sealed system"...

    I'm still shocked that the homeowner believed a company he never used before that wanted 3 grand for a liner over the boiler technician and the installation manual!
  • ChrisJChrisJ Posts: 10,503Member
    SuperTech said:

    Ha! I had a customer with a Smith Boiler, it was installed without a barometric damper and the draft was super high. I had to make the homeowner dig up his installation manual to show him that it was supposed to be installed with a barometric damper. The boiler and chimney were packed with soot. I cleaned the boiler, installed the barometric damper and recommended a quality chimney sweep company to clean the chimney. I told him to have me back after the chimney was swept to have me recheck the boiler and clean if necessary.....



    I came back to find out the owner called a different chimney sweep company and they installed a liner rather than sweep the chimney, and the re-did my flue pipe and removed the barometric damper and sealed the flue pipe connections with what appears to be furnace cement! Stating "it's supposed to be a sealed system"...



    I'm still shocked that the homeowner believed a company he never used before that wanted 3 grand for a liner over the boiler technician and the installation manual!

    You have to imagine how difficult it is for people that literally have no idea what you're talking about. So, whoever sells their point better, wins.

    This is probably what most people hear...





    The chimney sweep company did work they obviously had no business doing and got paid for it. That seems to happen an awful lot.

    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • SuperTechSuperTech Posts: 1,164Member
    @ChrisJ Good point. My story was added to the thread for anyone who does understand to get a laugh at.

    My point is that chimney guys shouldn't touch flue pipe or anything else besides the chimney.
  • EBEBRATT-EdEBEBRATT-Ed Posts: 6,557Member
    In MA. it used to be that the oil tech or gasfitter/plumber was responsible for the flue. Anyone could install it but the permit holder gas or oil was responsible and others could install it but supervised by the permit holder.

    To me that's the way it should be. Let's face it on a commercial job the oil/gas tech isn't likely to install a 24" welded flue pipe.

    A few years ago when they came out with a sheet metal license and now that muddied the water. They also license chimney sweeps but not sure what the line of demarcation is now
  • HVACNUTHVACNUT Posts: 2,858Member
    As a service tech, if I advise or know a client is having chimney work done, I always tell them I must return when the work is completed to check and, or adjust.
    But when you don't have a service agreement, then...
  • Bob HarperBob Harper Posts: 817Member
    The connector must meet NFPA 211 requirements. For 5" connector, it must be a min. 26 ga. galvy. Each joint requires a min. 3 screws equidistantly spaced. I recommend no horizontal seams or screws between 5-7 O'clock so it doesn't collect condensate like a sump. The pipe must slope up to the liner 1/4" per foot. There must be a barometric damper unless expressly prohibited by the appliance mfr. The baro. should be located as close to the appliance as reasonably practical. It should also be at least 1.5 to 2 duct diameters from the appliance collar, offsets or tees. This allows for minimum mixing of heat and flue gases for a more consistent setting of draft conditions. Keep in mind those same offsets should apply to your test hole for combustion analysis so in reality the baro. needs to be the x2 min. The gate on the damper must be level to operate properly. The counterweight must be set to Vertical/ Horizontal depending upon its orientation at the baro- 45 deg. or above is considered vertical/ below is horizontal. This allows the gate to react to the direction of airflow into the baro. and tee properly. You also need a test hole between the baro. and the chimney breaching to test the draft. The connector can NOT be coated or covered with ANYTHING including and especially foil tape. For one, there is no need in a negative vent pressure system. Two, it is not rated for these temps and 3, it masks corrosion/ changes/ damage to the pipe. The connector must take the shortest route practical. It should also have the maximum vent rise practical right off the appliance collar vs. sloping. All offsets must be supported or every 6 feet horizontal. A tee or cleanout is not required for listed liners unless specifically required by the appliance mfr. but the base of the liner must be "accessible', which means you cannot force the first connector joint way out into the room. Galvy. pipe is not intended or approved for permanent burial into a masonry wall but can be used in a thimble where it can be pulled for inspection or replacement. The connector must be the size of the appliance collar to the chimney unless common vented, where the manifold must be sized accordingly. yes, you can common vent gas and oil if properly sized, both have "primary safety controls" and it works. The liner must be properly sized. If your sizing calls for a 5" liner, then a corrugated liner must be derated 15% for oil/ 20% for gas for a straight vertical vent plus additional derating for offsets. That means you cannot use a 5" corrugated liner to a 5" connector unless the sizing calc's. allow it. Use a 5.5" or larger. If the system is gunking up with soot, it will quickly reduce the effective flue area and be subject to backpuffing. Oversizing 1/2" - 1" provides some allowance but you really shouldn't be sooting up a liner if properly set up and running. We try to incorporate a wye fitting at the wall where the liner penetrates into the room. This provides for a convenient inspection port up the flue with the connector still attached as well as a better cleanout for sweeping.
    HTH
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