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Best Soot vacuum in budget

Please help to choose best soot vacuum in budget ($100)
Note: Please Suggest me Best in Market

Comments

  • HVACNUTHVACNUT Posts: 2,330Member
    0 soot vacs for $100 new. Maybe you can find a used one.
  • ratioratio Posts: 2,054Member
    With very few exceptions, I have been sorely disappointed in tools purchased under a cheap budget; I invariably end up with a quality tool well outside my original budget.

    NB: I use them professionally.

  • SlamDunkSlamDunk Posts: 560Member
    edited September 4
    I have used filtered, bag in, shop vacs in place of my Goodway soot-o-matic with success. Goodway was in shop for repair.

    So, Goodway- Best in market

    Shop vac - under $100.00.
  • ChrisJChrisJ Posts: 9,917Member
    From a customer point of view, If I had an oil fired boiler and I hired someone to clean it.

    I would absolutely rather a guy who brings a $100 shopvac in to clean it over one that leaves a $600 sootvac on the truck because he can't be bothered to actually clean the boiler properly.

    Do the best with what you've got. I'd say Shopvac with a filterbag.

    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • Robert O'BrienRobert O'Brien Posts: 3,136Member
    > @ChrisJ said:
    > From a customer point of view, If I had an oil fired boiler and I hired someone to clean it.
    >
    > I would absolutely rather a guy who brings a $100 shopvac in to clean it over one that leaves a $600 sootvac on the truck because he can't be bothered to actually clean the boiler properly.
    >
    > Do the best with what you've got. I'd say Shopvac with a filterbag.
    I make the argument that a properly adjusted burner doesn't need to be vacuum cleaned. Get the guy with the analyzer who knows how to use it!
    To learn more about this professional, click here to visit their ad in Find A Contractor.
  • SteamheadSteamhead Posts: 13,132Member
    Filters or not, shop vacs often pass that real fine, fluffy soot into the room. Not fun to clean up.

    Our company uses Sootmaster vacs.
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    "Reducing our country's energy consumption, one system at a time"
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Baltimore, MD (USA) and consulting anywhere.
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/all-steamed-up-inc
  • ChrisJChrisJ Posts: 9,917Member
    edited September 4

    > @ChrisJ said:

    > From a customer point of view, If I had an oil fired boiler and I hired someone to clean it.

    >

    > I would absolutely rather a guy who brings a $100 shopvac in to clean it over one that leaves a $600 sootvac on the truck because he can't be bothered to actually clean the boiler properly.

    >

    > Do the best with what you've got. I'd say Shopvac with a filterbag.

    I make the argument that a properly adjusted burner doesn't need to be vacuum cleaned. Get the guy with the analyzer who knows how to use it!

    I've never seen one that was perfectly spotless.
    There's still going to be junk. I guess it could be swept out into a dust pan........


    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • SteamheadSteamhead Posts: 13,132Member
    @Robert O'Brien , of course you're right that a properly installed and tuned oil burner should create little or no accumulation. But how often do we follow the rag-and-taggers?
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    "Reducing our country's energy consumption, one system at a time"
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Baltimore, MD (USA) and consulting anywhere.
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/all-steamed-up-inc
  • STEVEusaPASTEVEusaPA Posts: 3,083Member
    edited September 4
    That SootMaster feels heavier & heavier every fall. I might actually try this one out and see how it goes.

    https://www.hammacher.com/product/cleanest-fireplace-vacuum?promo=search

    I know it says for 'cold ash', but hey, that guy isn't dirty at all...lol.

    As someone who does clean and tune them correctly, almost all of my oil fired units are rarely sooty. So this may work for most and save my back.

    I also looked at a backpack canister model that floor refinishers use, but if I recall was up over 2k...so no.

    --

    Most of my customers are on 2 and 3 year cleaning schedules, some with annual filter/strainer/nozzle.
    I'll crack my boiler open in a week or 2. Hasn't been cleaned in 4 years (but opened up and checked every year). And double filtration with a vacuum gauge, which isn't showing any restriction. So at least nozzle/filters/strainer this year.

    Like Dragon says..."If it ain't broke, you can't fix it". I miss him. Gotta get on Facebook.
    steve
  • SteamheadSteamhead Posts: 13,132Member

    That SootMaster feels heavier & heavier every fall.

    C'mon, it builds character >:)

    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    "Reducing our country's energy consumption, one system at a time"
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Baltimore, MD (USA) and consulting anywhere.
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/all-steamed-up-inc
  • ChrisJChrisJ Posts: 9,917Member

    That SootMaster feels heavier & heavier every fall. I might actually try this one out and see how it goes.

    https://www.hammacher.com/product/cleanest-fireplace-vacuum?promo=search

    I know it says for 'cold ash', but hey, that guy isn't dirty at all...lol.

    As someone who does clean and tune them correctly, almost all of my oil fired units are rarely sooty. So this may work for most and save my back.

    I also looked at a backpack canister model that floor refinishers use, but if I recall was up over 2k...so no.

    --

    Most of my customers are on 2 and 3 year cleaning schedules, some with annual filter/strainer/nozzle.
    I'll crack my boiler open in a week or 2. Hasn't been cleaned in 4 years (but opened up and checked every year). And double filtration with a vacuum gauge, which isn't showing any restriction. So at least nozzle/filters/strainer this year.

    Like Dragon says..."If it ain't broke, you can't fix it". I miss him. Gotta get on Facebook.

    My boiler hasn't had a cleaning in 8 years. Bet she's still spotless too. :p
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • JakeCKJakeCK Posts: 88Member
    Since some people recommended shopvacs, put a hepa filter in it with the hose attached to a water filter. You can make a water filter out of a 5 gallon bucket with lid. One hose goes between the vac and bucket, another hose comes out of the bucket for pickup. There is pvc piped in the bucket down to below the water on the pickup hose. They work great for drywall dust, and they keep the hepa filter almost spotless. Don't know if it'll work for soot tho... Look online for instuctions on how to make one.
  • Intplm.Intplm. Posts: 781Member
    @florenceccollinsc For $100??
    Probably not.
    At least not a soot vac.
    There is a type of ash vacuum that some use that are sold at big box hardware stores.

    There's one that is green in color that I have used called power ash? or power ash vacuum? (I no longer have it.)

    Good luck finding one in that budget. If you do find what you're looking for please share that info here.
  • STEVEusaPASTEVEusaPA Posts: 3,083Member
    JakeCK said:

    Since some people recommended shopvacs, put a hepa filter in it with the hose attached to a water filter. You can make a water filter out of a 5 gallon bucket with lid. One hose goes between the vac and bucket, another hose comes out of the bucket for pickup. There is pvc piped in the bucket down to below the water on the pickup hose.

    There’s no way I’m lugging all of that in and out of a customers house.

    steve
  • CanuckerCanucker Posts: 543Member
    > @JakeCK said:
    > Since some people recommended shopvacs, put a hepa filter in it with the hose attached to a water filter. You can make a water filter out of a 5 gallon bucket with lid. One hose goes between the vac and bucket, another hose comes out of the bucket for pickup. There is pvc piped in the bucket down to below the water on the pickup hose. They work great for drywall dust, and they keep the hepa filter almost spotless. Don't know if it'll work for soot tho... Look online for instuctions on how to make one.

    We've filled half of a 55 gallon drum with water and dropped a hose below the water line to keep carbon particles from escaping our loading tanks while we purge it out. It catches everything that escapes the tank. As long as long as the exhaust from your suction line goes under the water, it will catch your soot
    You can have it good, fast or cheap. Pick two
  • clammyclammy Posts: 2,258Member
    I brought my soot vac about 15 or 20 years ago and she still working ,I don’t think I would waste my time on using a shop vac .i have a few buds who do and they don’t last and usually before hitting the garbage can they spew usually when not wanted .if on a budget take a look at Sid Harvey they used to sell re conditioned one for a couple of bucks less. I rarely do oil any more just ain’t no money or at least what most will pay to have there un maintained oil burners serviced .one final note junk stuff will always let you down when most needed and least convenient time never fails at least for me .when I brought my soot vac I also didn’t want to spend but I did and haven’t had to buy another shop vac or fine vac since just my thoughts peace and good luck clammy
    R.A. Calmbacher L.L.C. HVAC
    NJ Master HVAC Lic.
    Mahwah, NJ
    Specializing in steam and hydronic heating
  • HVACNUT said:

    0 soot vacs for $100 new. Maybe you can find a used one.

    When i am searching, I found this review post about budget soot vacuum and this post list few soot vacuum under $100.
  • Steamhead said:

    Filters or not, shop vacs often pass that real fine, fluffy soot into the room. Not fun to clean up.

    Our company uses Sootmaster vacs.

    I think sootmaster under $100 :)
  • ChrisJ said:

    That SootMaster feels heavier & heavier every fall. I might actually try this one out and see how it goes.

    https://www.hammacher.com/product/cleanest-fireplace-vacuum?promo=search

    I know it says for 'cold ash', but hey, that guy isn't dirty at all...lol.

    As someone who does clean and tune them correctly, almost all of my oil fired units are rarely sooty. So this may work for most and save my back.

    I also looked at a backpack canister model that floor refinishers use, but if I recall was up over 2k...so no.

    --

    Most of my customers are on 2 and 3 year cleaning schedules, some with annual filter/strainer/nozzle.
    I'll crack my boiler open in a week or 2. Hasn't been cleaned in 4 years (but opened up and checked every year). And double filtration with a vacuum gauge, which isn't showing any restriction. So at least nozzle/filters/strainer this year.

    Like Dragon says..."If it ain't broke, you can't fix it". I miss him. Gotta get on Facebook.

    My boiler hasn't had a cleaning in 8 years. Bet she's still spotless too. :p
    Thanks for the suggestion but this is out of my budget :)
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