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Pipe hangers

I plan on replacing the old insulation on my steam heat system and as I was getting dimensions I noticed the support hangers that are currently in place could use a real upgrade. What type of hangers are good for insulated steam pipes? I cant seem to find a whole lot of info. Pipes are original 1920's black pipe.

Comments

  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 8,941
    Is your ceiling finished?
  • Intplm.
    Intplm. Member Posts: 1,336
    That's a good question. Are you hanging the pipe from a finished or unfinished area?
  • jpatnaude
    jpatnaude Member Posts: 3
    Unfinished ceilings, they hang currently from the joists with wire either hammered into the wood or around a nail/screw. clearance from bottom of joist to pipe can be as low as 1".
    Doesn't need to be pretty, I'm just looking for the safest way to support the pipes with insulation.
  • Intplm.
    Intplm. Member Posts: 1,336
    A simple DIY way to do it? I have seen do it yourselfers use band iron on the pipes and then insulate around the band iron.

    Not my way. But it worked/works well. There are more specific types of hangers you can use.
  • jpatnaude
    jpatnaude Member Posts: 3
    Im looking for a professional solution that I am able to purchase and install. Try to cut out the middle man to save some money. I just dont feel the current antiquated solution would pass muster down the road.
  • pecmsg
    pecmsg Member Posts: 2,321
    With any insulation you have to be careful with crushing it with a hanger that doesn’t distribute the load properly.
    Steam pipes are generally Fiborglass so get a tin cradle or saddle then a strap to hold it.
  • Sailah
    Sailah Member Posts: 826
    You could always use split pipe clamps, 3/8" threaded rod, 3/8" nuts and sammy screws. Work out how to poke a small hole in insulation to thread rod through.

    Split pipe clamps:

    https://www.supplyhouse.com/Piers-HSH-B01-1-Black-Split-Ring-Extension-Hanger

    Threaded Rod (home depot)

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt-3-8-in-x-36-in-Zinc-Threaded-Rod-802237/204273970

    Sammy Screws

    https://www.supplyhouse.com/Sioux-Chief-590-4421-SWG20-2-Horizontal-Sammy-for-Wood-Applications-3-8-Rod-Box-of-25
    Peter Owens
    SteamIQ
    mattmia2
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 8,941
    What I do: I use Sidewinders, 2" long or so, with 3/8" rod threaded hole.
    Go to Supply House.com under "pipe hangers", you will see them.
    I would recommend the driver socket for the Sidewinder.

    Then look on the site for clevis pipe hangers, mine are referred to as "Auto Grips". I buy 3/8" threaded rod in 10' lengths.
    You want the hangers for iron pipe sizes, not copper sizes which would be too small.

    The "Sidewinder" goes into the side of the floor joists at least 2/3
    of the way up. This gives you some length of hanger rod for swing as the pipe expands and contracts in length. If you are only 1" below the joists I would add a 2x4 against the joist to get the hanger away from the joist. Or you could add a 2x4 between the joists and drill a hole in it, then use just washers and nuts instead of the sidewinder. Again the longer the hanger rod the less the effect of the pendulum action of the pipe movement.

    I would go about every 10' with hangers.
    These are installed before insulation. The insulation can be notched into the hanger.
    This method allows you ample adjustments with the rod.
    I add a nut to the top and bottom of the rod to prevent any rotation and changes.

    Just a few dollars per hanger investment for the next hundred years.
    jpatnaudeSTEVEusaPA
  • Chris_L
    Chris_L Member Posts: 217
    I've had good luck with these:
    https://www.supplyhouse.com/Holdrite-302-1-Galvanized-Steel-Swivel-Ring
    (Though the ones I have don't have the rubber liner.)
    They go under the insulation.

    I've used them on 1" runouts and on my dry returns which are just 3/4". I'd probably use something heavier on the mains, but their old iron hangers seem to be doing just fine.
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 8,941
    I have used these (fairly light) hangers on 3" and 4" pipe.
    When hanging any iron/steel pipe/conduit I want enough support that I can hang on it or walk on it....at 225Lbs I have done both.
    The extra security of a 3/8" nut on the bottom of the rod and the top add redundancy to the entire support.
    You can step up to the swivel clevis type with the cross bolt at added expense. These are used in fire sprinkler piping....which should be the last thing to fall to the floor in a fire/structural failure. FWIW
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 10,268
    what @JUGHNE recommended
  • Zipper13
    Zipper13 Member Posts: 214
    edited March 2019
    I was wondering the same thing as OP. someone here had mentioned clevis hangers to me. thoughts?
    https://www.supplyhouse.com/Clevis-Hangers-725000

    EDIT: just saw that @JUGHNE already noted this!
    New owner of a 1920s home with steam heat north of Boston.
    Just trying to learn what I can do myself and what I just shouldn't touch
  • ethicalpaul
    ethicalpaul Member Posts: 3,123
    I was going to put up that same clevis link. I bought some and they look great. I'd never heard of Sammy Screws before so I bought some angle brackets to anchor the rod to the joists.
    1 pipe Peerless 63-03L in Cedar Grove, NJ, coal > oil > NG
  • mroberts5
    mroberts5 Member Posts: 76
    What about for wall mounting?
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 8,941
    A short 8" length of strut channel/unistrut/power strut etc with "cushy clamps" will give serious support and allow for exp/cont.
    Especially for multiple pipe runs, with longer strut, will line up a lot of pipe to look good. Layer another strut with channel nuts if you need an offset to crossover any pipes.
  • mikeg2015
    mikeg2015 Member Posts: 1,183
    I used clevis hangers on mine. Not great for insulating around, but cheap and secure.

    honestly a 3/4” section not insulated isn’t a big deal in my mind.

    The original hangers on mind were full rings With cast in female threads. They then used a 1/2”‘ Steel tie rod and goes into a 2x4 between the joists held with a big square nut and washer. Rings were of course installed before the pipe was connected.
  • ethicalpaul
    ethicalpaul Member Posts: 3,123
    edited November 2019
    It’s interesting this thread just got resurrected because I just installed a couple of my clevis hangers to shore up 10-20 foot lengths of “floating main” and now I get expansion and contraction noise on every heat and cool. Sounds like someone throwing a box on my front porch or dropping something heavy in the basement. The rod lengths are very short because my main is right up to my joists.

    I can’t imagine the solution is to try to tighten things up more because nothing I can do will stop the pipes from moving, so there must be a way to make things slide quieter. Ideas?

    I’ve considered greasing the hangers but I don’t think that’d last and might smell, or wrapping the hangers in something slidy
    1 pipe Peerless 63-03L in Cedar Grove, NJ, coal > oil > NG
  • acwagner
    acwagner Member Posts: 505
    I used this type when I redid my system:

    https://www.oatey.com/2378562/Product/Oatey-Galvanized-Dwv-Hanger

    Obviously only works when the ceiling is unfinished. Worked great for me. I don't have any expansion noises with this type.
    Burnham IN5PVNI Boiler, Single Pipe with 290 EDR
    18 Ounce per Square Inch Gauge
    Time Delay Relay in Series with Thermostat
    Operating Pressure 0.3-0.5 Ounce per Square Inch

  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 8,941
    The longer the hanging rod or strap the less movement of the clevis as the rod swings.
    This was discussed above somewhere.
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 11,970
    edited November 2019
    I used a lot of the short wooden dowels from BuyInsulationProducts.com

    They're round pieces of wood that you cut to fit into the insulation to hold the pipe off of the hanger.

    They aren't perfect, but they do seem to work. It also seems to keep expansion noises from happening as well.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • Gary Smith
    Gary Smith Member Posts: 367
    Loosen the hanger a little bit and insert a piece of plastic milk jug between the bottom of the pipe and the hanger. Let the hanger just do the vertical work of keeping the pipe from sagging, not resist horizontal forces.
  • ethicalpaul
    ethicalpaul Member Posts: 3,123
    JUGHNE said:

    The longer the hanging rod or strap the less movement of the clevis as the rod swings.
    This was discussed above somewhere.

    I read that, but I just don't have the vertical real estate.

    Loosen the hanger a little bit and insert a piece of plastic milk jug between the bottom of the pipe and the hanger. Let the hanger just do the vertical work of keeping the pipe from sagging, not resist horizontal forces.

    OK I had wondered about this, I'll try it. Apparently milk jug material is the miracle frictionless surface of our age! :wink:
    1 pipe Peerless 63-03L in Cedar Grove, NJ, coal > oil > NG
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 8,941
    Or a trapeze type with roller pipe over the horizontal part.
  • Hap_Hazzard
    Hap_Hazzard Member Posts: 2,389




    Just another DIYer | King of Prussia, PA
    1983(?) Peerless G-561-W-S | 3" drop header, CG400-1090, VXT-24
  • Zipper13
    Zipper13 Member Posts: 214
    edited December 2019
    New owner of a 1920s home with steam heat north of Boston.
    Just trying to learn what I can do myself and what I just shouldn't touch