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Steam Systems under big mouth vent

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Steve_210
Steve_210 Member Posts: 646
edited November 2018 in THE MAIN WALL
Hi guys, I see a lot of people started using these. Up until now the biggest vent was a Gorton No 2. My supply houses don't seem to know anything about them. Does anyone have a link for where I can get these? Also, has anyone had any problems with leaking etc? (It looks like a steam trap). Obviously, always want to make sure things are tried and tested before we start using them.
Thanks in advance.

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  • 1Matthias
    1Matthias Member Posts: 148
    edited November 2018
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    You can get it here: https://www.amazon.com/Barnes-Jones-Big-Mouth-Vent/dp/B01F26P13C/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1542309900&sr=8-1&keywords=barnes+and+jones+big+mouth or by calling Barnes & Jones and ordering directly.

    I've installed several around my town, and so far there's been no complaints, only praise. They spit a tiny amount of steam while closing, but then seal perfectly tight. They have an o-ring seal inside to ensure this.
  • KC_Jones
    KC_Jones Member Posts: 5,737
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  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 23,280
    edited November 2018
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    The only thing they don't do that Gortons do is close against water -- so so long as they are mounted high enough to never see water (28 inches above the water line for each psi of boiler pressure), they're really good.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
    1Matthias
  • 1Matthias
    1Matthias Member Posts: 148
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    The only thing they don't do that Gortons do is close against water -- so so long as they are mounted high enough to never see water (28 inches above the water line for each psi of boiler pressure), they're really good.

    Yep. Learned that one the hard way with a faulty water feeder... Upside, I got a free shower out of it..
  • Steve_210
    Steve_210 Member Posts: 646
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    Hope it wasn’t a hot steam shower!
    OK go thanks for the help
    Happy Thanksgiving to everybody
    1Matthias
  • mikeg2015
    mikeg2015 Member Posts: 1,194
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    Good reason to have 2nd pressuretrol as a interlock wired ahead of the feeder. If it overfills and it's set to 1.5psi then as long as the gorton is over 3ft above the pressuretrol it will shut down the feeder. Assuming you re using a vapor stat set lower.
  • 1Matthias
    1Matthias Member Posts: 148
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    Steve_210 said:

    Hope it wasn’t a hot steam shower!
    OK go thanks for the help
    Happy Thanksgiving to everybody

    Nope, cold dirty boiler water shower...turns out, that stuff tastes *nasty*.
  • ethicalpaul
    ethicalpaul Member Posts: 5,702
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    Hi gang— I keep reading about this height warning, but doesn’t the equalizer keep the column from rising on the return or am I horribly misunderstanding? Thanks!
    NJ Steam Homeowner. See my sight glass boiler videos: https://bit.ly/3sZW1el
  • nicholas bonham-carter
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    The pressure in the boiler-(even ounces) will raise the water in the wet returns 1.75 inches per ounce of pressure.
    If you connect a hose to the boiler drain, and mount the open end high, and fire the boiler, you can see the elevated level by moving the open end downwards until water come out of the hose. Using a hose made up of clear tubing, it is even easier to see the level changing. The difference between the at rest boiler level, and the firing level in the tube in inches divided by 1.75 equals the pressure in ounces.—NBC
    ethicalpaulCanuckerSeanBeans
  • ethicalpaul
    ethicalpaul Member Posts: 5,702
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    Thanks NBC!
    NJ Steam Homeowner. See my sight glass boiler videos: https://bit.ly/3sZW1el
  • Shalom
    Shalom Member Posts: 165
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    The difference between the at rest boiler level, and the firing level in the tube in inches divided by 1.75 equals the pressure in ounces.—NBC

    So why should I shell out for a 0-3 PSI gauge, when I could just make my own out of a piece of clear hose, and probably would be more accurate as well?
  • Fred
    Fred Member Posts: 8,542
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    Shalom said:

    The difference between the at rest boiler level, and the firing level in the tube in inches divided by 1.75 equals the pressure in ounces.—NBC

    So why should I shell out for a 0-3 PSI gauge, when I could just make my own out of a piece of clear hose, and probably would be more accurate as well?
    Because a 0 - 3 gauge won't spew boiling water everywhere should the Pressuretrol fail.
    1MatthiasCLambCanuckeradasilva
  • Shalom
    Shalom Member Posts: 165
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    Ah, good point...
  • KC_Jones
    KC_Jones Member Posts: 5,737
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    Or you do it so the "tube" is closed up with a long sight glass set up. This is for pressure control, but for just "seeing" pressure you can ditch all the controls.
    https://www.gwgillplumbingandheating.com/webapp/p/365/wilkinson-steam-boiler-replacement

    Or just buy a gauge. ;)
    2014 Weil Mclain EG-40
    EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Boiler Control
    Boiler pictures updated 2/21/15
    ChrisJ
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 15,671
    edited November 2018
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    You can also make a U tube that will shut off using pieces of cork at the top as a valve.

    The Dwyer Slacktube does this.


    Personally.......I'll stick to using Magnehelics for continuous measurement.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment