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Relocation of water main

brandonfbrandonf Posts: 130Member
edited February 2018 in Water Quality
I want to move over my water meter, backflow preventer, and expansion tank. I'd like to move them over to the right a little closer to the gas meters. I want to upgrade the size of all of them as well. They are all 1/2 inch, and the pipe coming into the house is 1 inch. I'll be replacing the rest of the plumbing in the basement with at least 3/4 inch since it's a mess.
Is there anything I should know about touching the backflow preventer and the expansion tank? I want to put the expansion tank vertical also.
Anyone think the Water Dept will bust my chops?

Any tips greatly appreciated.
Homeowner, Entrepreneur, Mechanic, Electrician,

"The toes you step on today are connected to the butt you'll have to kiss tomorrow". ---Vincent "Buddy" Cianci

Comments

  • ZmanZman Posts: 4,603Member
    You never know with a water department. They will want to be involved with anything effecting the meter or BFP. They will also want to turn off the curb stop themselves. Licensed plumber?
    I would show them the pictures and explain that you would like to make it better and see what they say.
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
  • EBEBRATT-EdEBEBRATT-Ed Posts: 4,946Member
    The meter probably belongs to the water dept, so I doubt you can change that. You will have to shut it off at the curb stop if you move the meter.

    Be careful with the electrical grounding. That has to go back together clean and tight.

    One note of caution, If their are any loose neutral connections in your electrical system or in any of your neighbors systems this could cause power to flow through the bare ground wire and your water pipe. Best thing is check the water pipe and the bare ground wire with an ammeter before disconnecting any ground wires
  • willasdadwillasdad Posts: 23Member
    As Enebratt pointed out, the water service is often carrying voltage as the acting ground, if you do find there is amperage on it, be sure to jump it out from where before your work starts, to after the point the work is finished. A set of car jumper cables is usually sufficient, black or red, just be sure to use the same on both ends or you will feel it! Also mentioned was using your curb stop. If you have a one inch line coming in the house, you will want to be sure to put a new ball valve on. It’s a good idea to contact the water district in advance so they can locate and verify the functionality of the curb stop. The valve should be the first device on the service, followed directly by the water meter, then the back flow preventer. No other taps before the backflow. The water district usually does own the meter, but if your choosing to upgrade, you may have to purchase a new one. It would also be of benefit to install a second valve after the backflow. This would enable you to service or replace the meter or backflow conveniently. A step further would be to install a tee and boiler drain after that second valve, this would enable you to drain the whole house if ever needed. The expansion tank is commonly a building code thing, and not always a concern of the water district, they will just be glad you have one. I know this post is old, but I figured I would just add on in case someone else finds themselves in the same position.
  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Posts: 9,750Member
    Minor correction here. If there is a backflow preventer or any other check valve type device on the water line, the expansion tank is a must. Not optional.
    Jamie



    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.



    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • willasdadwillasdad Posts: 23Member
    I indeed missed that, gotta have some place to expand to!
  • clammyclammy Posts: 2,120Member
    I think a better support for you portable expansion tank should be In order check out hydro claw tank supports nothing worse then a domestic tank that’s failed n put excess strain on your piping . Don’t forget to check your water pressure u might need a pressure reducing valve excesss water pressure damages and shortens life spans of toilet fluid master fill valves and some faucets will drip anything over 75 lbs is excess in my book . Have seen and done many upgrades similar to yours and always ended up installing prv .larger pipes lesss restriction more pressure and volume always seems to blow hot water safeties . Peace and good luck clammy
  • brandonfbrandonf Posts: 130Member
    As an update I learned I can remove the backflow preventer because we don't plan on using the first floor office as medical anymore. Although I'm not sure if I still need the expansion tank. Hopefully I don't need either one. I prefer to have less equipment to ever need replacement.
    Homeowner, Entrepreneur, Mechanic, Electrician,

    "The toes you step on today are connected to the butt you'll have to kiss tomorrow". ---Vincent "Buddy" Cianci
  • clammyclammy Posts: 2,120Member
    You should still have your incoming water pressure checked and if it is high then have a pressure reducing valve and a portable expansion tank installed peace and good luck clammy
  • hot_rodhot_rod Posts: 10,981Member
    I'd be very surprised if a public water provider allowed any connection without a BFD of some sort?

    There are two considerations for BFDs on a building, one is to protect the public system from any reverse flow from your building, a water main break, hydrant draw, etc.

    A second BFD requirement protects any equipment inside your building from contaminating your water within the building. This type of BFD is usually installed at the equipment, soda dispensers, coffee machines, commercial laundry, etc really any connection that could cause low or high hazard conditions within the building.

    Be sure whoever you spoke with is clear on what you are removing.

    Many public water providers get funding from State or Federal programs and BFDs are one of the requirements for those programs. Plumbing codes also dictate BFD requirements.
    More and more water authorities are requiring yearly testing and certification on that type of BFD. If it has test ports, it needs to be tested.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    The magic is in hydronics, and hydronics is in me
  • Zipper13Zipper13 Posts: 52Member
    the shutoff before your meter appears to read "3/4". It looks like the meter itself is also 1/2 inch or 3/4? might you need to upgrade those as well?
    New owner of a 1920s home with steam heat north of Boston.
    Just trying to learn what I can do myself and what I just shouldn't touch
  • LeonardLeonard Posts: 626Member
    edited February 13
    Read electrical code ....... think if water and gas lines are within 6 ft (spread of your arms) of other they have to be bonded together. think it's so if they get live and you touch both at same time you don't get shocked. Bonded = wire between them, code specifies size

    Even though they have to be bonded together, you can't use the gas line as electrical ground for the house ( think this just means you need to ground via water pipe and/or ground rods)
  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Posts: 9,750Member
    And if there is any type of valve on your water which prevents backflow -- pressure regulator, BFD, check valve, whatever -- you need an expansion tank on the system.
    Jamie



    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.



    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • GordyGordy Posts: 9,013Member
    I would install the BFD just for piece of mind. Whether or not some authority told you that it’s not needed. Sometimes who you talk to isn’t the most knowledable.
  • Intplm.Intplm. Posts: 221Member
    brandonf said:

    As an update I learned I can remove the backflow preventer because we don't plan on using the first floor office as medical anymore. Although I'm not sure if I still need the expansion tank. Hopefully I don't need either one. I prefer to have less equipment to ever need replacement.

    With most municipalities. Anything on your water main past the water meter is yours and not the water companies.
    The BFP was installed as you mention for Medical use in the building. If this is being discontinued, It will probably need to have an inspection done to cover that and verify the removal and the reason for that removal.
    Keep the expansion tank in place if you find that incoming water fluctuates. This can cause relief valves to prematurely discharge and close.

    Its' a good that you are improving your water main. A shut off valve on the meter spud on the supply side of the water meter might be required as a up date to your system.
    Also expect the water company to want to replace the water meter.
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