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Main vent enough?

MissButtersMissButters Posts: 4Member
edited November 2017 in Strictly Steam
Hi. We recently moved into an older house (built 1901) that has a mix of cast iron radiators and convectors. We are noticing that the farthest radiator on the 2nd floor from the boiler gets hot, but the room will become cooler than the rest of the rooms upstairs overnight. Also, the convector in the bathroom next to that room does not seem to be working (the pipe does not feel hot to the touch). In another forum, it was suggested we start with the ensuring we have enough venting on the mains. I have attached some pictures of the main vent (we only see one) and the boiler as well as the pressure gauge. Should we put in a bigger vent or add a vent somewhere?








Comments

  • FredFred Posts: 7,866Member
    You have two mains. Each should be vented. That one vent, in your picture is a Gorton #1. Probably not nearly enough venting capacity. How long is each Main? Where is the return for that second Main?
  • New England SteamWorksNew England SteamWorks Posts: 1,225Member
    edited November 2017
    Just a guess from the pictures, but it looks like you have one counter flow main, and one parallel flow main. The counter flow main should have it's vent at the end of the main, and the parallel flow main vent (pictured) is too small.

    But having said that, I don't see a drip for the counter flow, nor do I see a second return should it not be counter flow.




    New England SteamWorks
    Service, Installation, & Restoration of Steam Heating Systems
    newenglandsteamworks.com
  • FredFred Posts: 7,866Member
    Isn't there usually a drip on the main somewhere near the boiler on a Counterflow @New England SteamWorks ? I see what I think is a wet return on the floor, behind the boiler that is coming from the direction of that front main. I'm wondering if that main is also a parallel flow but the return drops to the floor at the end of the main???



  • New England SteamWorks
    Service, Installation, & Restoration of Steam Heating Systems
    newenglandsteamworks.com
  • neilcneilc Posts: 661Member
    looks like the top of the water heater gas main.
    Do not vent that.
  • Dave0176Dave0176 Posts: 1,043Member
    edited November 2017
    Fred said:

    Isn't there usually a drip on the main somewhere near the boiler on a Counterflow @New England SteamWorks ? I see what I think is a wet return on the floor, behind the boiler that is coming from the direction of that front main. I'm wondering if that main is also a parallel flow but the return drops to the floor at the end of the main???

    That’s kinda what it appeared to me too @Fred but it’s dark and can’t really tell.

    Also @MissButters your pressure is set too high, that should be down to .05 and inside the wheel should be 1.
    DL Mechanical LLC Heating, Cooling and Plumbing 732-266-5386
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  • FredFred Posts: 7,866Member
    Looks like the gas linethat drops down to the water heater to me, with a Tee and a plug in it.
  • FinishGuyFinishGuy Posts: 31Member
    I might have spotted the other end of the second main.

    1916 two-family, now condo. Top floor. 970 sq. ft. of ‘well ventilated’ space. One-pipe, parallel flow, gas fired steam heat. 27’ of 2” main (un-insulated) vented via Gorton #2. 27’ 1 1/2” dry return (un-insulated) vented by Dole #5. 7 HB Smith Princess 2 col. radiators (38” tall) & 1 ARCo 30s era thin-tube 6 x 8 sec. (32” tall) = total radiator EDR 244. Using Maid-o-Mist radiator vents, sized by calc. & 14 winters tinkering. 1980 HB Smith G210-S-5 rated output 120,000 btu, poor near boiler piping.
  • FredFred Posts: 7,866Member
    I think you are right @FinishGuy . If @MissButters can confirm that that pipe drops to the floor and runs over to a pipe that runs into the boiler, then that's where another vent needs to be installed.
  • EBEBRATT-EdEBEBRATT-Ed Posts: 5,804Member
    I am goin with @FinishGuy , I think there both parallel supply return and that tee drops to a wet return the one that runs behind the boiler.

    Not a fan of "gastite"
    But I am so excited

    The installer did the header right!!!
  • FinishGuyFinishGuy Posts: 31Member
    Looking at the original posted photo, I think the shadow of a vent is visible.

    There is also this.


    1916 two-family, now condo. Top floor. 970 sq. ft. of ‘well ventilated’ space. One-pipe, parallel flow, gas fired steam heat. 27’ of 2” main (un-insulated) vented via Gorton #2. 27’ 1 1/2” dry return (un-insulated) vented by Dole #5. 7 HB Smith Princess 2 col. radiators (38” tall) & 1 ARCo 30s era thin-tube 6 x 8 sec. (32” tall) = total radiator EDR 244. Using Maid-o-Mist radiator vents, sized by calc. & 14 winters tinkering. 1980 HB Smith G210-S-5 rated output 120,000 btu, poor near boiler piping.
  • I’m wishing Miss Butters well, and hope she has not become so confused with an inundation of information that she has given up on improving her system!—NBC
  • FinishGuyFinishGuy Posts: 31Member
    I hope @MissButters does return. It would be nice to hear how her travails are working out, but something else has caught my eye.

    Miss, I am a finish carpenter by trade. I have done some framing though, mostly by way of working for others over the years. Something is amiss with the built-up beam in your photos and your basement.

    I suspect the old carrying beam was strengthened by sistering a new piece of 2x lumber along its length on both sides, most likely nailed and lag bolts used, the heads of which can be seen.

    The 2x on the flat, on the bottom, has moved down and away from this built-up beam. I am uncertain about what purpose it served. As currently constructed perhaps it was meant to prevent twisting of the new assembly? It never provided much in terms of weight bearing ability to the built-up beam.

    The concern is that it might fall off. It looks to be a goodly length and therefore heavy and likely to hurt would it hit someone. It may have been like this for decades or maybe not.

    Please have a carpenter look at this. If it is indeed an integral part of the beam it can be jacked up and securely attached. Just not with nails going straight up and no adhesive.


    1916 two-family, now condo. Top floor. 970 sq. ft. of ‘well ventilated’ space. One-pipe, parallel flow, gas fired steam heat. 27’ of 2” main (un-insulated) vented via Gorton #2. 27’ 1 1/2” dry return (un-insulated) vented by Dole #5. 7 HB Smith Princess 2 col. radiators (38” tall) & 1 ARCo 30s era thin-tube 6 x 8 sec. (32” tall) = total radiator EDR 244. Using Maid-o-Mist radiator vents, sized by calc. & 14 winters tinkering. 1980 HB Smith G210-S-5 rated output 120,000 btu, poor near boiler piping.
  • FredFred Posts: 7,866Member
    @FinishGuy , it actually looks like the flat board is, it actually looks like the flat board, on the bottom may be securely nailed to the old timbers and that they may have sistered new 2X6's along side maybe 2X8's. Not sure why they even bothered with the flat board on the bottom, unless they were trying to hide some termite damage or other damage.
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