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failed gas inspection due to painted pipes/re plumb?

322Help322Help Member Posts: 4
edited April 2017 in Plumbing
My gas was turned off because someone tried to do illegal work, we had an inspection recently and didn't pass due to painted pipes, it's an Old Law 1968 Building, commercial use (we reside there) landlord wants to change it into Semi Commercial. What would be the best way to get our gas back? Re plumb the whole system? And then what is the process/wait time to get anything approved? Also, do you need a permit for a gas inspection?

Comments

  • STEVEusaPASTEVEusaPA Member Posts: 3,481
    Can I ask why is this your problem and not the landlords? Usually once you get nailed by the inspector for illegal work/no permit, you're on his hit list and now everything has to be perfect.
    They probably don't want the pipes painted because they want to see what kind of pipes were used (and some dope in the joints).
    As far as getting the gas back, that's up to the inspector. What does he say. It's either going to be clean the paint off the pipes, fight with him, or new piping.
    steve
  • 322Help322Help Member Posts: 4
    We are working together w/the landlord to restore it (he's older and not really around)
  • lchmblchmb Member Posts: 2,953
    one would think it passed inspection at the time of install it should be fine now.. I've never had one fail for painted pipes...
  • ChrisJChrisJ Member Posts: 10,239
    Did it fail because the pipes are painted, or, are not painted?

    Can you post some pictures of the piping in question?
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • kcoppkcopp Member Posts: 3,368
    I find it odd that it failed just because the piping was painted.
    You need to find a licensed pro to get this right....
    Yes s/he will need to pull a permit for an inspection.
    Most local codes actually want the piping on the outside of the building painted to prevent rusting/ corrosion of the fittings and piping.
    Typically what is needed is the appliances to be isolated and the system piping to be pressure tested. Here in NH 3 lbs. for 15 min will suffice.
    The system more than likely will never see more than 1/2 lb of working pressure.
  • EBEBRATT-EdEBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 6,109
    I know this is a different situation but

    In Mass you can't win. Outdoor piping is supposed to be painted.

    Inspector #1 shows up "why didn't you paint the pipe you dummy?. You know it's supposed to be painted. Do you think I want to come back for another inspection? your gonna have to pay for another inspection"

    Inspector #2 same job "Why did you paint the pipe before inspection? How do I know the paint isn't sealing a leak? How do I know the pipe isn't galvanized which is illegal in MA. How do I know this is legal ANSI approved pipe?"

    What we usually do now is paint the pipe but leave all joints threaded or welded exposed and touch it up later
  • hot_rodhot_rod Member Posts: 12,021
    maybe it is the color used?
    Isn't fuel gas piping supposed to be a certain color, grey has always been the color I see on the outside piping. ANSI A31.1
    Labels are usually color coded also.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    The magic is in hydronics, and hydronics is in me
  • JUGHNEJUGHNE Member Posts: 6,182
    Our NG company paints all the piping grey on the outside of the house (usually part of your house from overspray also).
  • 322Help322Help Member Posts: 4
    I am in NYC and the pipes are inside. Thank you all!
  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Member Posts: 11,436
    This is probably a silly question... but did you happen to ask the inspector, respectfully, why they failed the pipes? Or exactly what was needed to set it right? Most inspectors will answer if asked nicely.
    Br. Jamie, osb

    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.

    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • STEVEusaPASTEVEusaPA Member Posts: 3,481

    This is probably a silly question...

    Not silly at all...I asked that too.

    steve
  • 322Help322Help Member Posts: 4
    Failed 90 PSI pressure test due to painted pipes, this was what was written on the inspection certificate... The person that was in charge of the building was very shady and got fired so that's why we are working w/the owner to have it fixed. Just trying to figure out if we replumb (as this seems the best option according to few plumbers) what is the process from ConEd to get gas back and if even possible...
  • FredFred Member Posts: 8,100
    It may have failed a Pressure test but it certainly wasn't because the pipes were painted.
  • JUGHNEJUGHNE Member Posts: 6,182
    Fred, when the serious sin clipboard comes out, all infarctions are noted.....especially with some non permit work done. :o
  • ChrisJChrisJ Member Posts: 10,239

    I know this is a different situation but

    In Mass you can't win. Outdoor piping is supposed to be painted.

    Inspector #1 shows up "why didn't you paint the pipe you dummy?. You know it's supposed to be painted. Do you think I want to come back for another inspection? your gonna have to pay for another inspection"

    Inspector #2 same job "Why did you paint the pipe before inspection? How do I know the paint isn't sealing a leak? How do I know the pipe isn't galvanized which is illegal in MA. How do I know this is legal ANSI approved pipe?"

    What we usually do now is paint the pipe but leave all joints threaded or welded exposed and touch it up later


    Fred said:

    It may have failed a Pressure test but it certainly wasn't because the pipes were painted.



    Hmmm....
    I don't know............
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Member Posts: 11,436
    edited April 2017
    JUGHNE said:

    Fred, when the serious sin clipboard comes out, all infarctions are noted.....especially with some non permit work done. :o

    Isn't that the truth. I hope that the OP is still on here -- @322Help are you there? The very best thing -- speaking as a former building inspector now -- you can do is to go to them and admit that there are problems and that you have this licensed person on board (better yet, bring them along!) and ask what do we need to do?
    Br. Jamie, osb

    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.

    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • j a_2j a_2 Member Posts: 1,796
    It truly is time to get someone in there, that is up to date on the local gas codes...
  • EBEBRATT-EdEBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 6,109
    In MA all outdoor piping is supposed to be painted. Low pressure can be any color (unless OSHA, insurance company or others intervene) High pressure is supposed to be yellow. Indoor paint is not required.

    90 psi gas test for low pressure gas sounds pretty stiff. MA is only 3psi unless the system is very large the inspector can ask for higher pressure
  • IronmanIronman Member Posts: 5,303
    90 psi??

    15 psi is what is required around here in VA. Using a lower pressure will indicate a leak quicker than high pressure since a low pressure gas isn't compressed as much.

    It may be that the inspector saw very old pipes that were painted in an attempt to make them look more viable than they really are. Hence, he wanted the higher pressure to insure their integrity.
    Bob Boan


    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.
  • j a_2j a_2 Member Posts: 1,796
    I guestion the increments on a 90 psi gage....NFPA pretty much sets the standards for gas work,with some local jurisdictions adding there own little petty rules...
  • ScottSecorScottSecor Member Posts: 329
    Probably an old code, but I believe the code used to read "gas pipe shall be tested for 24 hours at ten times the working pressure." In most cased around here in NJ 'standard' pressure is 6" w.c., ten times that is 60" (or slightly more than 2PSI). Not too easy get a 2, 5 or even 10 psi gauge locally. We normally use a 0-60PSI gauge and pump it up to 40 or so.

    As far as painting gas pipe, we are forced to paint the steel pipe outside the building yellow on most commercial jobs. One gas company used to paint pipes green another would paint them gray. Local gas company just ran new high pressure lines in the street and new piping to all the houses over the winter. All exposed piping is galvanized, most of it not painted.

    We are forced to either paint the interior steel piping yellow or add "gas pipe" labels on most commercial jobs.
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