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filter/dryer

just started up a split sys. ,cooling only, and discovered th th dryer was installed backwards! What probs if any should we be expecting? Not looking forward to the time and effort to change it.

Comments

  • ratioratio Posts: 2,033Member
    IIRC there's a bypass that'll open if it's installed backwards, which means won't filter, might dry. It shouldn't be too bad to fix, just suck the juice back into the unit by closing the liquid valve & pushing in the contactor until the suction port drops down low. Don't go into a vacuum!
  • TechmanTechman Posts: 2,144Member
    Ah,for the want of an SAE LLFD!
  • ratioratio Posts: 2,033Member
    With valves & access teats. Flares always make me nervous, but they seem to hold on the mini splits with a touch of gorilla snot on 'em.
  • TechmanTechman Posts: 2,144Member
    edited June 2016
    I don't use any thread sealant of any type. Making a good flare isn't that difficult,I don't have loose flares.

    I use "stuff" when the SAE nut is subjected to freezing,like in refrig/freezer
  • ChrisJChrisJ Posts: 9,809Member
    Yeah,
    I've never heard of using anything on flares?

    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • ratioratio Posts: 2,033Member
    Nylog. I don't have any problem making good flares, especially since I got the eccentric cone tool, but I don't think a good metal-to-metal seal is possible in the field. Best you can hope for outside of laboratory conditions is adequate. It's more of a belt & braces kind of thing.

    I know this is a sensitive topic so please no one feel like I'm dissin' your method.

  • ChrisJChrisJ Posts: 9,809Member
    ratio said:

    Nylog. I don't have any problem making good flares, especially since I got the eccentric cone tool, but I don't think a good metal-to-metal seal is possible in the field. Best you can hope for outside of laboratory conditions is adequate. It's more of a belt & braces kind of thing.

    I know this is a sensitive topic so please no one feel like I'm dissin' your method.

    I don't think it's a matter of anyone being offended.
    It's a matter if introducing something into the joint that could actually cause an otherwise sound joint to fail.

    Flares made in the field have worked fine on brake lines, gas lines and all kinds of dangerous applications for many many years without any sealant.

    If you make flares, pressure test them, and then even pull a good 500 micron or lower vacuum on it, I'd call them good. Gorilla snot could be fine but fail down the road, who knows?

    That's all.
    No reason for anyone to get offended or upset. It's not like we're talking about cooking beef until it's well done or anything horrible.


    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • HEATONHEATON Posts: 110Member
    The filter/dryer direction discussion launched us into a discussion on flare connections(the dryer in question is soldered) but realize if it were flare it would be an easier swich. Good flares are possible in the field. been doing them for 50 years. However my training as a propane specialist in 1972 included the knowledge of and requirement by the supplier of a Parker Hannifin burnishing flaring tool fthat I still use to this day. After cranking down to form the flare the backoff makes one rotation without backing away from the formed surface(burnishing) the cone is wavey. We were informed by the fitting manu to use a small amount of reef oil for lube not sealing. There is another product for high vacuum apps that is used on the meeting surfaces but for the most part it is metal to metal. Carefull flaring with the right tool, about 125$, = 0 leaks
  • ChrisJChrisJ Posts: 9,809Member
    HEATON said:

    The filter/dryer direction discussion launched us into a discussion on flare connections(the dryer in question is soldered) but realize if it were flare it would be an easier swich. Good flares are possible in the field. been doing them for 50 years. However my training as a propane specialist in 1972 included the knowledge of and requirement by the supplier of a Parker Hannifin burnishing flaring tool fthat I still use to this day. After cranking down to form the flare the backoff makes one rotation without backing away from the formed surface(burnishing) the cone is wavey. We were informed by the fitting manu to use a small amount of reef oil for lube not sealing. There is another product for high vacuum apps that is used on the meeting surfaces but for the most part it is metal to metal. Carefull flaring with the right tool, about 125$, = 0 leaks

    Sorry for getting side tracked.

    Whatever happened to the system with the backwards filter dryer?
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • JUGHNEJUGHNE Posts: 5,713Member
    It would have been an easy fix if flare connections. No torch, no nitrogen needed......I have changed them by just pumping down, leave just a few psi in the line, loosen nuts while under pressure and slip new filter in while always maintaining some positive pressure in lines. In his case just flip around.
    But is brazed in then not so quick.

    I use Nylog on 410A threads (mostly mini-splits).
    For R22 I use a touch of oil on threads and a drop on the back side of the flared tube where the nut will rotate.

    The AC units I use come with solder filter dryer so that is what is used. Mini's come with the flare conn on unit. But I silver solder longer pigtails on the inside unit as the walls are thicker than usual and the outside bend would be right at the flare.

    I use flare LLFD for everything except 410A.

    Just expanding the conversation.
    Old school thought was that with a backwards LLFD could put some of the filtering material into the liquid line on it's way to the TXV/orifice. Don't know how factual that is BTY.
  • HEATONHEATON Posts: 110Member
    Thanks for the input. Excuse my daft, what is BTY?
  • ratioratio Posts: 2,033Member
    By The Way.
  • HEATONHEATON Posts: 110Member
    Thanks, I'm still strugling wit the old ackranyms. willing to learn the new ones. PTL
  • SWEISWEI Posts: 7,356Member
    Flare connections are good enough for brake lines and spacecraft. http://www.flaringspin.com/ rocks my world.
  • HEATONHEATON Posts: 110Member
    thank you. Wisdom is good.
  • TechmanTechman Posts: 2,144Member
    Wisdom is good! Deeds is gooder!
  • Dave0176Dave0176 Posts: 1,045Member
    I too like to use Nylog on threads, flares and especially the nylon gasket for TXVs.
    DL Mechanical LLC Heating, Cooling and Plumbing 732-266-5386
    Specializing in Steam Heating, Serving the residents of New Jersey
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  • IronmanIronman Posts: 5,084Member
    Brake and hydraulic lines are typically double flared. I've used this method on refrigeration, gas and oil for almost 20 years and NEVER had a leak.

    Double flare dies are inexpensive and will work with most any standard flaring tool.
    Bob Boan


    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.
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