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Oil to Gas Conversion

Smith19Smith19 Posts: 93Member
edited November 8 in Oil Heating
Hello all -

I have posted about this system before. The time has come to sell the family place and deal with the 1986 Peerless JO series as the oil tank has developed a case of incontinence. Recently, a gas generator was installed, so we now have gas on the property. Converting the system to gas (new boiler, plumbing, controls, flue, and labor) would easily run beyond $15,000 even with rebates offered. (Massachusetts offers rebates of up to $3000 for boilers up to 96% AFUE if I'm correct). That kind of cost doesn't make sense for selling the house. As such, I am considering a power gas burner conversion for this boiler. The thinking is that buyers would see the oil tank removed from the basement with the opportunity of upgrading the boiler easily in the future. Some questions:

The Peerless JO/JOT series is known for being a tight boiler. We have had issues with clogging and our trusty tech has had to break out the saw to clean the sections. Would the tightness of the heat exchanger pose an issue for a gas burner in any way?

What considerations have to be taken with the flue? It looks like we would need a special MG-1 type damper with a spill switch. Is a costly lining installation required? The flue is in pretty good shape.

Could this boiler support a sixth zone for a sidearm tank? We can't keep the two burner arrangement as is seen in the photo - it makes no sense. I don't know what the boiler's rated for but it doesn't look super deep. House is roughly 3,000 sqft.



Thanks!

Comments

  • STEVEusaPASTEVEusaPA Posts: 3,489Member
    You should either put in the new boiler w/indirect, vent it thru the wall to improve the selling price of the home, or leave it as is and let the prospective buyer take the costs off the selling price of the home.
    Just putting in a gas power burner, if that boiler would support it, requires a chimney liner, running gas pipe, permits, an indirect tank, removing the oil tank, etc.
    I doubt a prospective buyer would feel very comfortable with that arrangement and figure the boiler needs replacement, and will probably ding you on the price anyways.
    steve
  • Smith19Smith19 Posts: 93Member
    edited November 8


    Just putting in a gas power burner, if that boiler would support it, requires a chimney liner, running gas pipe, permits, an indirect tank, removing the oil tank, etc.

    The problem is the oil tank is leaking so we will have to do something. Replacing just the tank seems silly if there is already gas available.


    The neighbor's house was recently renovated. This is what they pulled out after over a decade of trusty service, so there is a precedent for this on a JO boiler:
  • EBEBRATT-EdEBEBRATT-Ed Posts: 6,115Member
    I would put in a gas hot water heater. You could make another zone and use an indirect but if you selling a water heater is probably less expensive. Flue liners are not that expensive or hard to install (usually)

    I see no reason not to convert that boiler to gas with the right technician.

    Ma rebates are for 96% + not up to 96%
  • ratioratio Posts: 2,135Member
    Did you grab the burner when you had the chance? That would make the decision easy!
  • Smith19Smith19 Posts: 93Member
    ratio said:

    Did you grab the burner when you had the chance? That would make the decision easy!

    Haha would've fit right in!

  • HVACNUTHVACNUT Posts: 2,633Member
    edited November 9
    Replace the oil tank and let the buyer decide how they want to proceed.
    Replacing the system. Converting to gas. Monetarily it doesn't make sense to spend X thousands when it wont increase the home value by much. Definitely not enough to recoupe your out of pocket costs. And you wont even be there to see the savings from converting. On the other hand, if you like throwing money at people, PM me.😁
  • EdTheHeaterManEdTheHeaterMan Posts: 251Member
    I prefer OilHeat myself, BUT... I tell my customers that are selling their home, Converting to natural gas will increase the chances of getting a buyer. All things equal the gas heat house will sell faster than the oil heat house.

    The listing agreement for selling your home has a check mark for heating system. You only get to check GAS.

    So spending 15,000 for a really efficient GAS heat system will get you no more for the house than spending less than $5000.00 on a power burner, atmospheric water heater and an aluminum chimney liner (they are cheeper then stainless steel).

    The new gas pipe and burner, new water heater and some elbow grease on the old Peerless will impress most buyers. Remember, most buyers are not HVAC experts, but will be looking at the Kitchen and Bathrooms.

    Go for the low price and get rid of the oil tank.
  • EdTheHeaterManEdTheHeaterMan Posts: 251Member
    Follow Up:
    that Bock 32E looks fairly new, Put that on crags list and get a few bucks for it.
  • SteamheadSteamhead Posts: 13,360Member


    So spending 15,000 for a really efficient GAS heat system will get you no more for the house than spending less than $5000.00 on a power burner, atmospheric water heater and an aluminum chimney liner (they are cheeper then stainless steel).

    NEVER use an aluminum chimney liner. Any chimney that has operated with coal and oil will have a lot of sulfur deposits. These will eat up an aluminum liner. We've had at least one customer who had aluminum but it disintegrated, and they had to get a new liner- stainless steel, of course.

    Sure, stainless costs a bit more than aluminum, but far less than doing the job twice or facing possible legal action from a subsequent owner.
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    "Reducing our country's energy consumption, one system at a time"
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Baltimore, MD (USA) and consulting anywhere.
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/all-steamed-up-inc
  • EdTheHeaterManEdTheHeaterMan Posts: 251Member
    Never heard that before. Aluminum liners were the rage 20 years ago, I think I would have run across a failed liner :neutral:

    There is a first time for everything and you learn something new every day. @Steamhead has more time on here than me, so I Yield to the more experienced :blush:
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