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100 years from now...

Steve MinnichSteve Minnich Posts: 2,467Member
I’m sure Dan had pipefitters and boilermakers in mind when he came up with his iconic saying. But this simple coat rack applies in my mind.

I was inspecting a steam boiler replacement at a church built in 1917 when the pastor gave me a tour of the building. This coat rack is 102 years old and just beautiful.
Steve Minnich
Tell me I can't, and I'll show you I can.

Comments

  • Erin Holohan HaskellErin Holohan Haskell Posts: 1,130Member, Moderator, Administrator
    Beautiful! Thanks for sharing, @Steve Minnich
    President
    HeatingHelp.com
  • Intplm.Intplm. Posts: 836Member
    All aspects of the workmanship of the day are great. What will be said about ours in 2119 I wonder ?
  • Steve MinnichSteve Minnich Posts: 2,467Member
    There’s still a lot of tradespeople who care, who have integrity. Sadly, most just rip and run for the money.
    Steve Minnich
    Tell me I can't, and I'll show you I can.
  • gerry gillgerry gill Posts: 2,954Member
    Just think about where we were as a country when that coat rack was built. Bi planes, horses in the streets, cars with wood spoke wheels.
    gwgillplumbingandheating.com

    Serving Cleveland's eastern suburbs from Cleveland Heights down to Cuyahoga Falls.

  • SV9_9SV9_9 Posts: 37Member
    edited July 6
    deleted
  • EBEBRATT-EdEBEBRATT-Ed Posts: 5,951Member
    The difference is the jobs put in today won't last 100 years. I don't thing anybody is going to say, "gee look at the pex they used back then"
  • DanHolohanDanHolohan Posts: 14,721Member, Moderator, Administrator
    There’s a very old umbrella rack (with keys) outside our Assembly Room at The General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen. I’ll show it to you at Wetstock. It’s a work of art.
    Retired and loving it.
  • RayWohlfarthRayWohlfarth Posts: 770Member
    I would love going back in time to see how they installed the boilers without the tools we have today. I would like visiting the job sites and talk with the installers.
    Ray Wohlfarth
    Boiler Lessons
    Click here to take Ray's class.
    Click here to buy Ray's books.
  • Steve MinnichSteve Minnich Posts: 2,467Member
    Me too. The guys were smaller than us back then and doing work that demanded a lot more physicality.
    Steve Minnich
    Tell me I can't, and I'll show you I can.
  • EBEBRATT-EdEBEBRATT-Ed Posts: 5,951Member
    @RayWohlfarth & @Steve Minnich

    I agree think about that often. I have been told that a lot of the threaded pipe they did 8, 10, 12" was all measured in the field and cut and threaded at the shop.

    I don't think they had much portable equipment and if they did most places may not have had electricity in 1900. They used to pull strings wherever they wanted a pipe and measured it all.
    Haul it to the job with horse and wagon

    The place I started at in 73 my boss told me they threaded all the 'small stuff" 2' and under by had the owner was too cheap to buy a threading machine and this was in the 40s
  • RayWohlfarthRayWohlfarth Posts: 770Member
    @Steve Minnich They were a tough group.
    @EBEBRATT-Ed Can you imagine life back then? How did they tighten 10 or 12" pipe? Their knuckles must have dragged on the ground LOL
    Ray Wohlfarth
    Boiler Lessons
    Click here to take Ray's class.
    Click here to buy Ray's books.
  • ratioratio Posts: 2,070Member
    If you could fit up 12" pipe by hand, I don't think it would be your knuckles that would be dragging on the ground.

    Pipefitters and Masons are the only trades I don't get too mouthy with.

  • RayWohlfarthRayWohlfarth Posts: 770Member
    LOL Good point
    Ray Wohlfarth
    Boiler Lessons
    Click here to take Ray's class.
    Click here to buy Ray's books.
  • delta Tdelta T Posts: 773Member
    I recently came across someone on youtube who is going back in time and using nothing but handtools to make his home and workshop. As in, cutting trees, hewing timbers, planing and truing stock with hand tools, etc....

    It is mesmerizing to watch, awesome video production too. No talking, no music, no nonsense, just a guy making things by hand. I bet a lot of you would dig it.

    The channel is called Mr. Chickadee, I recommend the Roubu Workbench video highly, though all of his videos are great.



    Nice to see craftsmanship surviving in this day and age!
  • Solid_Fuel_ManSolid_Fuel_Man Posts: 1,644Member
    My goodness you can see why people weren't fat back then. Only rich people were because they paid people to make stuff for them.
    Serving Northern Maine HVAC, and Controls
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