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New drop header, disappearing water

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Comments

  • ethicalpaul
    ethicalpaul Member Posts: 4,212
    Yes, without a moment's hesitation I would buy a Peerless again. The only other brand I would consider would be a WM or its lower-tier stable-mate Williamson. Maybe *maybe* if I had to have oil I might pick a megasteam but frankly Burnham scares the heck out me.
    1 pipe Peerless 63-03L in Cedar Grove, NJ, coal > oil > NG
  • panick007
    panick007 Member Posts: 18
    New boiler was delivered today, so, depending on how long it takes to get it down the basement steps (similar to the set-up @ethicalpaul has) I'll either do it tomorrow or Friday. Here's a question. The old boiler has an 8" flue, new Peerless has 7" with a 6" reducer. @ethicalpaul I see you went 6", and I'm curious if there is any advantage or disadvantage to 6" or 7"?
    Paul
    ethicalpaul
  • pedmec
    pedmec Member Posts: 713
    @ethicalpaul Burnham scares me so much that i convert my burnham independence to forced hot water after 9 years of steam. After 10 years plus you know your getting a hole above the water line. Replaced too many of them after 10 and wasn't taking a chance while the cast iron is not leaking.
    ethicalpaul
  • ethicalpaul
    ethicalpaul Member Posts: 4,212
    edited December 2022
    panick007 said:

    New boiler was delivered today, so, depending on how long it takes to get it down the basement steps (similar to the set-up @ethicalpaul has) I'll either do it tomorrow or Friday. Here's a question. The old boiler has an 8" flue, new Peerless has 7" with a 6" reducer. @ethicalpaul I see you went 6", and I'm curious if there is any advantage or disadvantage to 6" or 7"?

    I'd go with what the manual says to use. Mine came with a reducer (I think to 5"?) from the factory so I used it. The inspector freaked out when he saw it (in his experience a reducer would never come from the factory and was only added by knuckleheads) but Peerless also sent a piece of paper saying the reducer was sent by them on purpose so he relented.

    I think they maybe use the same exhaust hood for the L and the non-L models and maybe they send a reducer with the L models. Not sure but if they sent it I'd use it.
    1 pipe Peerless 63-03L in Cedar Grove, NJ, coal > oil > NG
  • panick007
    panick007 Member Posts: 18
    They did send it, I was curious because the manual states “Series 63 models are certified to Z21.13/CSA 4.9 “Gas Fired Low Pressure Steam and Hot Water Boilers” for use in USA with tapered reducers on the outlet of the vent damper. A tapered vent reducer is located in the draft hood carton for
    Series 63 models.
    Use reducer only where reduced vent connector size also meets ANSI Z223.1 / NFPA 54 and applicable provisions of local building codes. Factors that impact allowable vent connector diameter include vent connector type, lateral length, chimney type, chimney height, and chimney area.”

    I have a large chimney with a stainless liner and it’s right at the location of the boiler and up high, so my vent pipe is nearly vertical. In other words, plenty of draft so I guess I’ll use the reducer. 
    Paul
    ethicalpaul
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 7,207
    There is a section of rules in the code that allow you to take a guess at this. Ideally someone that understands combustion would figure it out.
  • ethicalpaul
    ethicalpaul Member Posts: 4,212
    Good eye, Paul. My situation is exactly as you describe so I guess I guessed right
    1 pipe Peerless 63-03L in Cedar Grove, NJ, coal > oil > NG
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,180
    You’re welcome! 
    Retired and loving it.
  • KC_Jones
    KC_Jones Member Posts: 5,354
    panick007 said:

    Installation (mostly) complete! Got it up and running on Sunday afternoon. Set it up as delivered but I plan to make a few adjustments/additions to ease maintenance and monitor operation.

    One big and pleasant surprise with this new boiler, which is smaller than the one it replaced, is the heat in the house is much more even. The only thing I changed is the boiler, no thermostat or radiator changes so far, but gone are the swings in temp we have always lived with. Previously it would start to feel chilly before the radiators heated up, now it seems like the radiators are always at least a little bit warm still when the thermostat calls for heat again. Last night my wife said something I never thought I would ever hear: "I think you can turn the heat down a degree". She has complained of being cold in this house for twenty years!

    Here are some photos showing how I got the boiler to the basement (thanks @ethicalpaul for the ramp idea) and how I piped the drop header. No insulation yet but it's on the list. Opinions welcome and encouraged.








    I would like to thank @KC_Jones @Jamie Hall @ethicalpaul and @mattmia2 for their input, and everyone else on the site who so generously share their knowledge and experiences, and especially @DanHolohan for writing the book that started me down this path and for this site, which helps to keep alive the knowledge of the dead men.

    You're Welcome!

    I view my participation here as paying it forward due to all the help I received years ago.
    2014 Weil Mclain EG-40
    EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Boiler Control
    Boiler pictures updated 2/21/15
    mattmia2ethicalpaul
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 7,207
    Next get rid of the CSST.

    Great job. If the thermostat is mechanical, if the new boiler's controls draw less less current than the old one, the cycle lengths will lengthen because the anticipator won't heat as much(or vise versa if it draws more current).
  • ethicalpaul
    ethicalpaul Member Posts: 4,212
    Fantastic! Those old school bulkhead stairs are a lifesaver
    1 pipe Peerless 63-03L in Cedar Grove, NJ, coal > oil > NG
    mattmia2
  • panick007
    panick007 Member Posts: 18
    edited December 2022
    @mattmia2

    It’s actually a clock thermostat, but I learned through trial and error that I’m better off at a constant temp 24/7, my fuel bill actually dropped when I quit the set-back.

    I’ve seen many a disparaging comment on the cycleguards, and initially I didn’t understand how they work, thought there was a problem when it shut the system down a few times on that first firing, but aside from the frequent safety checks, why all the hate? Are they unreliable somehow or just different?

    Should I buy a new probe for the McDonnell & Miller LWCO that was on the old boiler and use that instead. If yes, why? I’m trying to understand what’s bad about the Cyclegard as I have read some opinions that it’s the safest system.
    Paul
  • ethicalpaul
    ethicalpaul Member Posts: 4,212
    Everyone hates the Cyclegard except for me and I think one other pro here. Yes it shuts down the system periodically but who cares unless you are sitting down there watching it after you just installed the boiler and you get impatient? (This has to be why so many pros hate it, there can be no other reason).

    As you said, there is no safer way to verify the water level. A probe will sense the splashing water from boiling even if the water level is very low.
    1 pipe Peerless 63-03L in Cedar Grove, NJ, coal > oil > NG