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Oil to Gas Conversion Chimney Liner Help

Hi Guys,

I am switching over from Oil to Gas in the next couple of months. For the conversion, I am going to need to install ad stainless steel chimney liner. Does anyone have any recommendations for liner manufacturers? Does the liner need to be double walled or can it be single walled? The house is on Long Island, NY

Thanks,

Pat

Comments

  • Jersey2
    Jersey2 Member Posts: 144
    The hvac company might include lining the chimney and taking care of it. At least in my case they did.
    I'm not a plumber or hvac man and my thoughts in comments are purely for conversation.
  • HVACNUT
    HVACNUT Member Posts: 4,856
    There is a permit for this, right? Are you the homeowner or the contractor? 
  • PilotPat24
    PilotPat24 Member Posts: 61
    HVACNUT said:

    There is a permit for this, right? Are you the homeowner or the contractor? 

    There will be a permit for the job. I am the homeowner but I will be installing the liner.
  • pecmsg
    pecmsg Member Posts: 3,532
    Best to have the contractor supply the material and labor. Just too many issues with customer supplied parts and labor.
  • Wrightlb
    Wrightlb Member Posts: 2
    Make sure you check the installation instructions of the equipment you plan to install. They specify what is required and that should keep you out of trouble down the line. I need to line my b-vent if I move to a modcon.
  • PilotPat24
    PilotPat24 Member Posts: 61
    There is a permit for this, right? Are you the homeowner or the contractor? 
    There will be a permit for the job. I am the homeowner but I will be installing the liner.

    pecmsg said:
    Best to have the contractor supply the material and labor. Just too many issues with customer supplied parts and labor

    Thanks for the advice pecmsg.   With my mechanical background and work experience, I'm sure I'll be able to successfully install a liner.

    Thanks,

    Pat
  • pedmec
    pedmec Member Posts: 712
    Good luck finding a installer whose going to install a new boiler into a homeowner installed chimney liner.
    Long Beach Ed
  • EdTheHeaterMan
    EdTheHeaterMan Member Posts: 4,913
    edited October 2022
    pedmec said:

    Good luck finding a installer whose going to install a new boiler into a homeowner installed chimney liner.

    What makes a liner installed by a qualified person with mechanical background any different than a liner installed by a person who charges money for a liner installation? I have installed several liners for customers and I don't see what the big deal is. You take the parts out of the box and you slide them down the chimney. The person at the bottom of the chimney will pull on the rope to assist. When the parts are all in place. you connect the vent connector from the appliance to the liner.

    @PilotPat24 If you live near @pedmec and all the contractors are as he says, you might need to go to Staples and get some blank invoice forms and write yourself a bill so you can pay yourself. Now you are
    a paid professional chimney liner installer. Pick a catchy company name like: Pat the Pilot Prepares Perfect Chimneys LLC

    "That Was Easy"
    Edward Young Retired HVAC Contractor & HYDRONICIAN Services first oil burner at age 16 P/T trainer for EH-CC.org
    MikeAmannWMno57Jcheat22
  • Bob Harper
    Bob Harper Member Posts: 955
    I have a chimney contractor recommendation for you if you're anywhere near Smithtown-Chief Chimney. It's nothing to installing liners--that's why they sell them online. Of course, when you get it stuck or sized it wrong, you'll pay double for a pro to pull what's left of your liner and install one professionally. You need to know the sizing, allow, listed components, warranty, listed installation instructions, maintenance requirements, and how to connect it. He'll also help you with a tee or wye cleanout/ condensate trap.
    FYI, many liner mfrs. void the warranty if sold online so check with the mfr. and not the seller.
    A corrugated liner must be derated 20% off the bat plus more for offsets. A smoothwall liner negates the deration. It also flows better with far less static pressure drop.
    EdTheHeaterManWMno57Jcheat22
  • pedmec
    pedmec Member Posts: 712
    @EdTheHeaterMan Sorry, wouldn't trust a homeowner putting something as important as putting a liner down the chimney. i would bet that they wouldn't know if they ripped it or crushed it. Without expertise in what your doing Murphy's law applies. And tell me you haven't found chimney liners hacked in. Multiple times i have demoed the old boiler and realized that they only put 5' of liner in the chimney at the base and 5' of liner on the top and made it looked complete. As Bob Harper has said they are easy but doing it wrong is even easier. someone else can take that liability.
  • pedmec
    pedmec Member Posts: 712
    Bob said "it is easy" but i added "but doing it wrong is even easier". just wanted to clarify
  • Long Beach Ed
    Long Beach Ed Member Posts: 1,043
    The problem here on Long Island is that I've seen more "professionals" install five feet of liner than homeowners.
    ethicalpaul
  • ethicalpaul
    ethicalpaul Member Posts: 4,176
    pecmsg said:

    Best to have the contractor supply the material and labor. Just too many issues with customer supplied parts and labor.

    I agree. We never see any problems with contractor-supplied material and labor on this fine site.
    1 pipe Peerless 63-03L in Cedar Grove, NJ, coal > oil > NG
  • pecmsg
    pecmsg Member Posts: 3,532
    Best to have the contractor supply the material and labor. Just too many issues with customer supplied parts and labor.
    I agree. We never see any problems with contractor-supplied material and labor on this fine site.
    I should have said “Qualified” contractor.