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Cut radiator pipe while removing old fittings

branimal
branimal Member Posts: 176
I nicked a radiator pipe (1") while removing some old fittings. In the past I've used Blue Block to seal nicks. Not sure if this cut is too severe for Blue block. I know people use some type of plumbers rope in the threads. Forgot what that was called.

The next fitting is a 3 way tee which would be way too much work to replace.

Here are some pics.



Comments

  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 12,362
    That's pretty deep. Yes, you can use plumbers wicking if you can find it. Basically, waxed string.

    I would probably just use Teflon tape and dope. I like the regular tape, but some insist on blue monster which I don't like. My favorite dope is Rector seal True Blue.

    But asking a question of will it work you will get 1000 different answers on what people would use. Everyone has their favorites.

    get ready for the onslaught
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 19,426
    You're not the first one... I can think of at least two ways out of that -- but both depend on having a threader. First, try filling the cut -- completely -- with an epoxy, such as JB Weld, which will take the temperature and hardens hard. Then rethread. Second, cut the pipe a bit shorter, thread the new end, and use a coupling and a short nipple.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 5,999
    Is it steam or hot water? Supplyhouse.com has ball wicking. I'm guessing this is steam since the pipe is in such good condition.

    Can you get to the next fitting with wrenches to unscrew the pipe out of it? That pipe looks to be in very good condition and should unscrew with the proper tools used properly.
  • branimal
    branimal Member Posts: 176
    edited August 18
    mattmia2 said:
    Is it steam or hot water? Supplyhouse.com has ball wicking. I'm guessing this is steam since the pipe is in such good condition. Can you get to the next fitting with wrenches to unscrew the pipe out of it? That pipe looks to be in very good condition and should unscrew with the proper tools used properly.
    I didn’t know radiator pipes could be disassembled.  I thought after decades of use, the pipes and fittings are steam welded.

    the system is steam.



  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 9,908
    Are you going to extend this pipe....cap it or what is the plan....??
  • branimal
    branimal Member Posts: 176
    JUGHNE said:
    Are you going to extend this pipe....cap it or what is the plan....??
    I’d like to 90 right there so I can fit a radiator.
  • ethicalpaul
    ethicalpaul Member Posts: 3,759
    You can disassemble steam pipes and fittings. If I can, anyone can. 
    1 pipe Peerless 63-03L in Cedar Grove, NJ, coal > oil > NG
    mattmia2
  • pedmec
    pedmec Member Posts: 290
    You can do megapress. Rent the set up from the supply house. But me? i would back the nipple out. By the time you try and seal that and hope it works you could have just put a new nipple in. And you wont have to worry about it leaking after you close the floor.
    mattmia2branimalPC7060EdTheHeaterMan
  • newtonkid88
    newtonkid88 Member Posts: 100
    That's pretty deep. Yes, you can use plumbers wicking if you can find it. Basically, waxed string. I would probably just use Teflon tape and dope. I like the regular tape, but some insist on blue monster which I don't like. My favorite dope is Rector seal True Blue. But asking a question of will it work you will get 1000 different answers on what people would use. Everyone has their favorites. get ready for the onslaught
    Why dont you like Blue Monster? I accidently bought a can because I thought the stuff was blue like I’ve seen other guys use. It LOOKS more of a gritty white paste.
  • PC7060
    PC7060 Member Posts: 781
    edited August 19
    Agree with @pedmec; I’d remove and replace the section of pipe.  Looks accessible and you can get a  pipe cut to size at Home Depot or Lowes. 

    I’ve used Ridgid MegaPress to fix errant cuts in radiant heat lines (by others :p ).  Those were typically mid span cuts for lines that could not be easily replaced.  Really saves the day for the customer. 
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 12,362
    @branimal

    Sometimes they are as good as welded, sometimes you get lucky
    branimal
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 9,908
    An advantage of a steam system is that you could pipe everything below the floor with a cap on your rad riser, then fire up the system to a fair bit of pressure.

    Look for leaks with a mirror or cold spoon looking for condensation to show.

    Unlike water systems you can shut it down for repairs without draining the entire system.

    I am sure you are aware of maintaining slope on that runout and using swing 90 ells.
    branimal
  • branimal
    branimal Member Posts: 176
    JUGHNE said:
    An advantage of a steam system is that you could pipe everything below the floor with a cap on your rad riser, then fire up the system to a fair bit of pressure. Look for leaks with a mirror or cold spoon looking for condensation to show. Unlike water systems you can shut it down for repairs without draining the entire system. I am sure you are aware of maintaining slope on that runout and using swing 90 ells.
    The tee is setup on a pitch.  So the pipe will drain.

    what is a swing 90 ell?
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 9,908
    Assuming the pipe you are replacing is a horizontal run out to a rad, it should be sloped to drain back to the tee.

    At the end of your new pipe, a 90 with a close nipple pointing horizontally, then another 90 to point up to the rad valve.
    This would be a swing 90 set up. It gives you something to swing as the pipe expands with the steam temp.

    It also allows you to have your rad valve riser adjusted to be plumb straight up for better alignment.

    Usually standard practice in steam piping. You might see them in your basement for other runouts.
    branimal
  • gerry gill
    gerry gill Member Posts: 3,045
    When I nick the threads I use permatex gasket maker as pipe dope. Works excellent.
    gwgillplumbingandheating.com
    Serving Cleveland's eastern suburbs from Cleveland Heights down to Cuyahoga Falls.

  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 12,362
    I have NEVER nicked a thread ;):'(:s
    Larry WeingartenPC7060ethicalpaul
  • ethicalpaul
    ethicalpaul Member Posts: 3,759
    The great contradiction: we must make a swing to allow for the joint to turn due to expansion and yet every joint gets frozen almost immediately and is very difficult to free, even with a cheater.
    1 pipe Peerless 63-03L in Cedar Grove, NJ, coal > oil > NG