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Branch piping

MikeDurigon
MikeDurigon Member Posts: 24
Disagreement in the office with the better piping practice of branch piping off the heating mains. One group believes that only off the top to feed unit heaters above or below centerline of the mains. Others say off the top or angled (45) off top for unit heaters above or angled (45) off the bottom for unit heaters below centerline. The guys saying only off the top add in that you need to vent the return piping for unit heaters below centerline. Vents are installed at the unit heaters on the return side of the piping regardless of piping arrangements. 

Comments

  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 7,207
    I assume this is steam?
  • MikeDurigon
    MikeDurigon Member Posts: 24
    No Water
  • MikeDurigon
    MikeDurigon Member Posts: 24
    Actually glycol/ water mix 40/60 mix, freeze protection  
  • pecmsg
    pecmsg Member Posts: 3,573
    From my early days in the fitter's apprentice program never install takeoffs on Chilled water piping at 6 or 12 o'clock. 6 sediment settles, 12 air forms.
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 18,269
    I don't see any difference in the takeoff piping. A well designed and piped system should include a high point air vent, or multiples and a good central air scrubber. That should provide an air free, quiet, efficient system.

    Even piping systems with up and down, over and under beams for example, will work once properly vented.

    There are times when under-slung piping can be used, as a means to prevent ghost flow. But just on the return side.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
    Ironman
  • MikeDurigon
    MikeDurigon Member Posts: 24
    Interesting Hot Rod. I’ll read up on your comments. Do you not agree with pecmsg comments about sediment and air formation at 6 or 12 o’clock position not being ideal. I understand about the use of a magnetic part filter but it’s not ever shown to be used on most spec jobs done up here in the north west
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 18,269

    Interesting Hot Rod. I’ll read up on your comments. Do you not agree with pecmsg comments about sediment and air formation at 6 or 12 o’clock position not being ideal. I understand about the use of a magnetic part filter but it’s not ever shown to be used on most spec jobs done up here in the north west

    Ideally there should not be a lot of sediment is a properly treated hydronic system, heated or chilled same for air. With todays microbubble air purgers, dirt and magnetic separators the system fluid should be, and stay very clean. If you have or plan on ECM circulators you really want to consider a mag separator, else the circulator becomes one :)

    Chronic sediment, rust, corrosion, etc could be mitigated with hydronic conditioner chemicals.

    Really no reason to pipe off any plain of a horizontal pipe in hydronics, that I can see? From 12 o clock to any time :)
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
    GGross
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 13,152
    I agree with @hot_rod

    The pipe should be sized with enough velocity to remove most of the trapped air and move it to the vent or air separator. If that is done no sediment will collect