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Black pipe question

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Can I hook up another rad to this 11/4 inch black pipe by putting a Tee right where it goes into the main? Will save me trouble instead of tieing into the main thanks 

Comments

  • ethicalpaul
    ethicalpaul Member Posts: 5,702
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    What is the EDR of the existing radiator and of the new radiator?
    NJ Steam Homeowner. See my sight glass boiler videos: https://bit.ly/3sZW1el
    Ironmanhankwylerjr
  • EdTheHeaterMan
    EdTheHeaterMan Member Posts: 7,842
    edited November 2020
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    I think Paul is saying Yes if the pipe is large enough. Important to consider the proper pitch of the piping so the returning condensate does not cause a noise problem.

    And remember, when it comes to steam BPM! Black Pipes Matters!

    Edward F Young. Retired HVAC ContractorSpecialized in Residential Oil Burner and Hydronics
    hankwylerjr
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 15,532
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    Doubtful that the 1 1/4" is large enough for two rads
    hankwylerjr
  • EdTheHeaterMan
    EdTheHeaterMan Member Posts: 7,842
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    Doubtful that the 1 1/4" is large enough for two rads

    On this comment, "Size Matters"

    Edward F Young. Retired HVAC ContractorSpecialized in Residential Oil Burner and Hydronics
    STEAM DOCTORhankwylerjr
  • hankwylerjr
    hankwylerjr Member Posts: 124
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    Sorry for the delay, I'll get a EDR today, sum pictures, the one rad is tiny and the other bigger but I'm thinking I'd be OK but don't want to chance it thanks 
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 15,695
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    Usually they are sized fairly close to the load, but I believe I have a 60sqft on an 1 1/4".  I also have 3 other 55 sqft on an 1 1/4 each as well.

    However, for my smaller radiators they did 1 1/4" horizontal to a 1" vertical so in that case, you might be able to do it.  
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
    ethicalpaul
  • hankwylerjr
    hankwylerjr Member Posts: 124
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     did not have time to get yet but here iwhat I'm working with, there might be duplicate pictures hard to do on this phone as vision isn't the best anymore, there are 2 rads total 
  • nicholas bonham-carter
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    What is the goal here-to increase the heat in one room?—NBC
  • hankwylerjr
    hankwylerjr Member Posts: 124
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    @nicholas bonham-carter trying to add a rad directly above the larger one in my bathroom attic. The 1 1/4 goes up about 8 feet to that rad
  • Ironman
    Ironman Member Posts: 7,376
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    EDR = Equivalent Direct Radiation. It’s the surface area of the rad expressed in square footage.

    Use the table below to determine your EDR.


    Bob Boan
    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.
  • hankwylerjr
    hankwylerjr Member Posts: 124
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    @Ironman thanks I got it just didn't have the time to calculate it yet
  • ethicalpaul
    ethicalpaul Member Posts: 5,702
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    I have some small ones (not tiny, they serve small bedrooms, 18 and 24 EDR that are supplied by 1” pipe so I think your 1-1/4 will probably work for your two, but I’ll have a better guess when I know the EDR of yours
    NJ Steam Homeowner. See my sight glass boiler videos: https://bit.ly/3sZW1el
  • AMservices
    AMservices Member Posts: 610
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    1-1/4" horizontal run out to a one pipe , up feed riser will handle 55 EDR. If you drip the riser it will handle 144 EDR.
  • hankwylerjr
    hankwylerjr Member Posts: 124
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    Gentlemen, I believe that the EDR comes to 67
  • AMservices
    AMservices Member Posts: 610
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    The 1-1/4" coming off the main will supply the steam, but to avoid slow heating and water hammer, you should drip the pipe into a wet return. Or, if you don't want to run a wet return around the basement, you can drip the vertical riser into a loop seal (basically a 5' deep water trap) then follow the main back to the boiler and drop into the return there.
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 15,695
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    Like I said, I have 60sqft on an 1 1/4.   It works fine.

    I'm not saying it'll definitely work, but it's probably worth trying.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
    ethicalpaulhankwylerjr
  • hankwylerjr
    hankwylerjr Member Posts: 124
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    @AMservices that pipe that runs down is the wet return, I'm trying to figure best way to tie into the 1 1/4 now
  • AMservices
    AMservices Member Posts: 610
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    Is the insulated pipe in the picture horizontal or vertical?
    What direction is the steam flowing?
    Is the 1-1/4" pipe going up into a radiator or a wall?
    Maybe its me, but I can't tell the layout of the piping.
    Any more pictures from further back?
  • hankwylerjr
    hankwylerjr Member Posts: 124
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  • hankwylerjr
    hankwylerjr Member Posts: 124
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    Pipe is going up to the 1st floor in the picture through the floor. I want to run the new pipe over to this short span near the T
  • AMservices
    AMservices Member Posts: 610
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    The best way to go about it because you have a union right there at the drop to the wet return, would be to add a tee on the main.
    What I would do is cut the nipple between the tee for the last take off and the vent. Separate the union and nicely take apart the fittings on a pipe vise with some heat and B.F. wrenches.
    Discard the cut nipple. Add a new 1-1/4 tee and re-work the vent and pipe back to the union.
    Or you could cut the 1-1/4" nipple after the 45°, take out the 45° and the nipple off the main, put a close nipple, a 45°, tee, union, reconnect existing radiator, pipe new line to the wall where you want to go up. Where it turns up install a 3/4 drip and cut the drip line into the wet return.
    Second option sounds like more of a pain to me.
    And it looks like cutting into the wet return against the wall will be a pain in the knuckles.
    hankwylerjr
  • hankwylerjr
    hankwylerjr Member Posts: 124
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    @AMservices thnx sounds tricky but i may give it a shot prob the first option