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Extending a steam pipe

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pweedith
pweedith Member Posts: 7
edited October 2020 in Strictly Steam
I'm trying to figure out if this is something I can do myself or if it needs to be hired out. 

I have an unused radiator hookup on my second floor. There's no heat on the third floor. My plan is to uncap the existing second floor pipe and extend it to the third floor.

This will require going about 8ft vertically, then a 6 foot horizontal run to get the pipe where I want it to come out in the third floor, and then 12-18" vertical to get through the floor and attach my radiator valve. 

I just got a quote for $ to do what is stated above (radiator not included in this) and then an additional $ to clean and service the boiler. The job seems somewhat straightforward in my head. I'm not the most experienced with jobs around the house but have been teaching myself over the last year. 

In my head I'd need 3 lengths of pipe, 2 elbows, and I already have a radiator valve. Would I need to use any kind of dope on all the joints? I'm assuming I'd need a slight angle on the horizontal piece running back to the source. 

What would the level of difficulty of this be? I figure I can get all the materials for around $100 and save $ by doing it myself. 

Any advice or input appreciated. 

Comments

  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 23,324
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    In principle, it's easy. You should do the job in threaded iron pipe -- but if you know the lengths you need, the Big Box might be persuaded to thread it. You can also buy fittings from the Big Box, but... better to see if you can find a plumbing supply house to sell you US made fittings. They tend to be round; the Big Box ones often aren't.

    There are differing opinions on sealing threaded joints. I lean toward just two or three wraps of teflon tape. Some folks like pipe dope. Some folks like both. If the fittings and pipe are actually round and threaded correctly, all three approaches work. If they aren't, noting works.

    Now having said all that. Be sure you check the size of your pipe -- particularly the "horizontal" one -- to make sure it is big enough for the radiator. It really matters. We can help you with that, if you know the EDR of the radiator.

    And that "horizontal" pipe can't be horizontal. It should have at least an inch drop in that length. On the other hand, the verticals should be vertical... One way to do that is to use two 90s at each end, joined by a close nipple. So you'd need 4 elbows, not 2, and 2 close nipples. There are other ways...

    There's a great deal of satisfaction to be gained by doing such a thing yourself. Some frustration, yes. And it will take longer than a pro. would. But... you get it done and you can be rightly proud of it.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
    SteamCrazyethicalpaul
  • SteamCrazy
    SteamCrazy Member Posts: 100
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    Agree with Jamie.. Also does that pipe capped get hot??  Just to ensure that it's hooked up at other end. It would be a huge disappointment if you go through all that to find out it was also cut on other end. 
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 9,666
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    You will likely have to skim the oil from that new pipe out of your boiler after it runs for a few days too.
  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 16,842
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    @pweedith , we do not discuss pricing on this forum. See:

    https://heatinghelp.com/forum-user-manual
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    Towson, MD, USA
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Consulting
    Erin Holohan Haskell
  • ethicalpaul
    ethicalpaul Member Posts: 5,704
    edited October 2020
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    Agree with Jamie.. Also does that pipe capped get hot??  Just to ensure that it's hooked up at other end. It would be a huge disappointment if you go through all that to find out it was also cut on other end. 
    It probably doesn’t get hot regardless because the trapped air keeps the steam from getting to the end. To test it for real, uncap it and then run the boiler to see if steam escapes
    NJ Steam Homeowner. See my sight glass boiler videos: https://bit.ly/3sZW1el
    mattmia2
  • pweedith
    pweedith Member Posts: 7
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    Steamhead said:
    @pweedith , we do not discuss pricing on this forum. See: https://heatinghelp.com/forum-user-manual
    Sorry, my mistake. I wasn't aware of that rule. 
    Erin Holohan Haskell
  • pweedith
    pweedith Member Posts: 7
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    Jamie Hall said:
    And that "horizontal" pipe can't be horizontal. It should have at least an inch drop in that length. On the other hand, the verticals should be vertical... One way to do that is to use two 90s at each end, joined by a close nipple. So you'd need 4 elbows, not 2, and 2 close nipples.
    Any chance you could send me links that would show me what it is you're talking about with close nipples? I assumed that there would need to be some sort of angle to that pipe for water to drain back. Just need to make sure I get the proper slope so any tips on ensuring that would be appreciated. 

    Also, I lucked out. I talked to one of my bar regulars who mostly does commercial work yesterday about what needed to be done. He's a real friendly guy and extremely handy. He offered to do the job for half the price if I take care of drilling the holes through the wall and floor that the pipe will need to pass through and also give him a hand hooking everything up. He has the ability to thread his own pipe and will take care of getting materials. 
  • dopey27177
    dopey27177 Member Posts: 887
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    Since you decided to half farm the job out before assembling the pipe take plaster of paris and sprinkle it on the threads and inside the pipe then wire brush the plaster off, all the oil will be absorbed and the pipe will be free of oil.

    Jake