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Would You pipe this differently?

Timco
Timco Member Posts: 3,026
Oil boiler was here when we bought it. Got the EFTU free when I was at HTP and I just ran a gas main all the way across the house for LP in the kitchen and to equipment. The idea is to leave the oil system as a standby back up heat source. Throw a couple valves and a couple switches and you’re using one or the other. Same manifold. Due to where I threw the controls up I’m considering putting the new P/S manifold behind the oil boiler. Thoughts?



Just a guy running some pipes.

Comments

  • Ironman
    Ironman Member Posts: 6,576
    I can't exactly follow the piping from the pics, but I'd pipe both boilers injecting into the house loop through closely spaced Tees. I know it's an extra pump involved, but that way you'd only have to throw a switch to change over. Doing it like that, anyone (your wife family members, etc.) could do it without having to figure a valving arrangement.
    Bob Boan
    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.
  • Timco
    Timco Member Posts: 3,026
    That’s exactly what I’m doing. There’s an internal pump in the wall unit and one for the oil boiler with 6 pumps not shown in the ceiling that run the zones.
    Ironman said:

    I can't exactly follow the piping from the pics, but I'd pipe both boilers injecting into the house loop through closely spaced Tees. I know it's an extra pump involved, but that way you'd only have to throw a switch to change over. Doing it like that, anyone (your wife family members, etc.) could do it without having to figure a valving arrangement.

    Just a guy running some pipes.
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 10,324
    I am a little concerned about the distance from the boiler to the oil tank. I think 5' is minimum
    STEVEusaPA
  • rick in Alaska
    rick in Alaska Member Posts: 1,243

    I am a little concerned about the distance from the boiler to the oil tank. I think 5' is minimum

    I am confused. Why is there a minimum distance from the tank? Is it a local code thing? Fire rating?
    Rick
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 15,037
    Prime candidate for a HydroSep :)
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 10,324
    @rick in Alaska

    I know Mass code was always that the tank had to be 5' from the oil boiler. Mass has since dumped there Code and adopted NFPA.

    I am not sure what NFPA wants but I am sure there is some minimum distance.

    I realize the new boiler is gas but is installed between the oil boiler and the tank....looks pretty close.

    Just playing inspector here
  • rick in Alaska
    rick in Alaska Member Posts: 1,243

    @rick in Alaska

    I know Mass code was always that the tank had to be 5' from the oil boiler. Mass has since dumped there Code and adopted NFPA.

    I am not sure what NFPA wants but I am sure there is some minimum distance.

    I realize the new boiler is gas but is installed between the oil boiler and the tank....looks pretty close.

    Just playing inspector here

    Thanks for the clarification. It makes sense where you are. I don't think about it because virtually all our tanks are outside on stands, so no where close to the burner.
    Rick
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 10,324
    @rick in Alaska

    I did look it up in NFPA-31 oil code and it is 5' tank to any source of ignition unlsee you put a 1 hour fire wall in between
    rick in Alaska
  • Timco
    Timco Member Posts: 3,026
    So I was inspected today. Oil burner is 10’ and any other ignition source or appliance is 5’ or a 1-hour barrier. He’s asking me to hang some drywall but not secure it and that will suffice. Really nice guy. Passed my gas main. 

    @rick in Alaska I did look it up in NFPA-31 oil code and it is 5' tank to any source of ignition unlsee you put a 1 hour fire wall in between

    Just a guy running some pipes.
  • Ironman
    Ironman Member Posts: 6,576
    Is sealed combustion a "source of ignition"?
    Bob Boan
    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.
    mattmia2
  • Timco
    Timco Member Posts: 3,026
    The section says or any appliance. He was good about it.
    Ironman said:

    Is sealed combustion a "source of ignition"?

    Just a guy running some pipes.
  • pecmsg
    pecmsg Member Posts: 2,340
    Ironman said:

    Is sealed combustion a "source of ignition"?

    That's a good question unfortunately the circs, t-stat and electrical box's on the HTP ARE a source of ignition!
  • Timco
    Timco Member Posts: 3,026
    1) it’s not an electric water heater..

    2) the circ in this is Taco.
    pecmsg said:

    Ironman said:

    Is sealed combustion a "source of ignition"?

    That's a good question unfortunately the circs, t-stat and electrical box's on the HTP ARE a source of ignition!
    Just a guy running some pipes.
  • pecmsg
    pecmsg Member Posts: 2,340
    Timco said:

    1) it’s not an electric water heater..

    2) the circ in this is Taco.

    pecmsg said:

    Ironman said:

    Is sealed combustion a "source of ignition"?

    That's a good question unfortunately the circs, t-stat and electrical box's on the HTP ARE a source of ignition!
    Source of Ignition
    Electrical equipment is a source of ignition if it creates an arc or spark during operation.

    Cir maybe, maybe not. T-Stat YES!

    This is all up to the building inspector

  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 3,979
    Us a thermistor and the boiler's control for the indirect. No switch on the water heater then...

    Do explosion proof switches with some sort of shielding still count as a source of ignition?