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Best propane boiler for a humid basement

djorgen
djorgen Member Posts: 3
I am replacing a dead Vaillant oil boiler with a propane boiler. I'd rather not deal with oil any longer, but if anyone disagrees I'd listen. I have an old house and the basement is humid most of the year and in the spring there is well drained water visible in an area 8" below the concrete floor the boiler sits on. I am down to a Weil-McLain GV90+, a Slant/Fin S-120 or a Buderus GC144 from 3 different contractors. I have read the GC144 has been discontinued but apparently the contractor can get it. I have read in other posts to go with who you trust the most, but I find them all to be trustworthy. The Weil-McLain is condensing, which generally seems better. The Slant/Fin contractor swears by their replacement policy. They're all within $500 so that does not matter as much as getting a boiler that will last a long time in the humid basement. What do people think about these issues?

Comments

  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 8,972
    Have you considered a heat pump water heater?
    They are supposed to help dehumidify the basement as they heat your water.
  • djorgen
    djorgen Member Posts: 3
    JUGHNE said:

    Have you considered a heat pump water heater?
    They are supposed to help dehumidify the basement as they heat your water.

    A hot water heater is not on the table til the current one dies, but it is food for thought in the future. Priority #1 is getting a boiler to heat the house.
  • STEVEusaPA
    STEVEusaPA Member Posts: 5,321
    edited September 2020
    I'd disagree with you, but I don't know why you want to switch from oil to propane. I'd check with friends and neighbors (who have propane) if there are any supply/delivery issues for your area, and historic pricing. I think you'd do better with the oil, but like I said, depends on your area.
    Don't know why you are basing your choice on humidity. They're all made out of metal that will rust, and have electronics that can be affected.
    Put a dehumidifier in the basement if needed.
    I'd put a in an Energy Kinetics oil boiler. The best total system efficiency on the market, you can switch the burner to gas (propane) if you want in the future.
    steve
    SuperTechszwedj
  • EzzyT
    EzzyT Member Posts: 1,167
    I agree with @STEVEusaPA Energy Kinetics is the  best way to go. 
    szwedj
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 15,055
    Try and reduce the humidity, that can't be good for equipment, or the structure itself? Mold like humid spaces!
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
  • djorgen
    djorgen Member Posts: 3

    I'd disagree with you, but I don't know why you want to switch from oil to propane. I'd check with friends and neighbors (who have propane) if there are any supply/delivery issues for your area, and historic pricing. I think you'd do better with the oil, but like I said, depends on your area.
    Don't know why you are basing your choice on humidity. They're all made out of metal that will rust, and have electronics that can be affected.
    Put a dehumidifier in the basement if needed.
    I'd put a in an Energy Kinetics oil boiler. The best total system efficiency on the market, you can switch the burner to gas (propane) if you want in the future.

    The oil tank is in the basement and is probably 30-40 years old. It has surface rust and it seemed like a good time to switch before anything goes wrong with it. I don't know of any propane delivery problems in the area. I found a cooperative that sells propane for less than the commercial companies. Plus we want to put in a gas fireplace and stove and it would make that easier.

    One of the installers said the high efficiency boilers are like computers and don't do well with high humidity. I've tried a humidifier and it runs all of the time. It is a house from the 1800s and has field stone walls. Thanks for the link.
  • motoguy128
    motoguy128 Member Posts: 380
    One or two dehumidifiers do wonders.  I have two in my basement.  My cut stone foundation let’s in plenty of moisture and leaks pretty bad in some places when the ground is wet and heavy rain. 

    That being said.  If you vent two pipe.  The inside cabinet  of most mod cons is 100% outdoor air.  So a damp basement isn’t a huge deal.  But it will still make other parts rust.  
    djorgen
  • pecmsg
    pecmsg Member Posts: 2,345
    That boiler has nothing to do with the RH in the basement! Run 1 or 2 small dehumidifiers year round.

    As far as OIL or GAS Id stick with OIL or Nat gas but never LP!
    SuperTechSTEVEusaPA
  • SuperTech
    SuperTech Member Posts: 1,691
    Surface rust on the outside of the tank doesn't mean anything. Its the condition of the inside of the tank that counts. Your oil filter will be a good indicator of the condition of the inside of the tank.  
    My oil tank and plenty others are older than that and have plenty of life left in it. Even if you have to replace the tank its not a big deal. 
    Go with the EK boiler, stick with oil. Most people I've seen convert to LP have regretted the decision. 
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 17,132
    I'm with @STEVEusaPA and the rest up there -- stick with oil. At least in my area, LP is quite expensive, per BTU, relative to oil. I do have LP heat in one of the buildings I maintain, but only because it was the simplest and least expensive solution to an odd problem -- and isn't used much.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England