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How to turn off Homart wall gas heater?

stanstvstanstv Member Posts: 6
edited August 2 in THE MAIN WALL
Hi all, I can't figure out how to turn off my wall heater. I've seen a few videos on youtube and there are instructions on the unit, but I can't find the dials to turn off pilot light and gas. I also can't seem to find an instructions manual for this specific unit.


Comments

  • Larry WeingartenLarry Weingarten Member Posts: 1,824
    Hi, It's a little unclear from the photo, but at the end of the stainless flex connector... the one further towards the right, it might be your shut off valve right at the end of that flex connector.

    Yours, Larry
    stanstv
  • stanstvstanstv Member Posts: 6

    Hi, It's a little unclear from the photo, but at the end of the stainless flex connector... the one further towards the right, it might be your shut off valve right at the end of that flex connector.

    Yours, Larry

    Thanks Larry! That's what I was thinking, but I wasn't sure if it shut off the entire thing. #5 on the instructions made me think there are two valves I'm supposed to find -- one for the pilot light and another for gas. But I only see that valve.
  • EdTheHeaterManEdTheHeaterMan Member Posts: 636
    edited August 2
    @stanstv Here is a picture of a "gas train" from a boiler from about the same era as your Homart

    You can see the gas pipe feed to the main shut off valve. There is also a small (1/8" pipe thread) valve that is before the main valve shut off, that supplies the pilot. Prior to the 1940s and into the early 1950s the pilot gas was considered a small enough amount that could remain on while the main valve was closed. This way the pilot could remain lit while the main burner was serviced.

    In your picture, it is hard to tell if the pilot tube is connected to a separate valve or to the control valve.

    A = The main gas pipe before the VALVE
    B = The main VALVE
    C = The pilot valve. follow the pilot tube F to under the gas control valve E to see if it connects to a manual valve C or the control valve E. My guess is a small valve.
    D = Manual valve after the control to shut off gas to the main burner but allows the pilot to remain lit (in operation) for service and testing.
    E = Gas control valve. (Red wire connections) opens and closes based on thermostat input and limit temperature input.
    F = Pilot tube.

    PS. after the gas is turned off, it's not a bad idea to get a brush and vacuum to remove some of the dust.

    Hope this helps
    stanstv
  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Member Posts: 12,956
    Umm... what's under that scuzzy looking red cover?
    Br. Jamie, osb

    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.

    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • EdTheHeaterManEdTheHeaterMan Member Posts: 636

    Umm... what's under that scuzzy looking red cover?

    Really old wires, an electromagnet, and some more cobwebs

    mattmia2
  • ratioratio Member Posts: 2,496
    That appears to be a millivolt gas valve, the thermopile almost certainly ties in to it. The pilot tube heads down behind the flex line & perhaps turns back up to a B valve behind the millivolt valve. The tube that leaves the millivolt valve on the right-hand side heads up to beside the vent on the regulator, so perhaps it's also a vent. @EdTheHeaterMan's annotations seem correct to me.
  • stanstvstanstv Member Posts: 6

    @stanstv Here is a picture of a "gas train" from a boiler from about the same era as your Homart

    You can see the gas pipe feed to the main shut off valve. There is also a small (1/8" pipe thread) valve that is before the main valve shut off, that supplies the pilot. Prior to the 1940s and into the early 1950s the pilot gas was considered a small enough amount that could remain on while the main valve was closed. This way the pilot could remain lit while the main burner was serviced.

    In your picture, it is hard to tell if the pilot tube is connected to a separate valve or to the control valve.

    A = The main gas pipe before the VALVE
    B = The main VALVE
    C = The pilot valve. follow the pilot tube F to under the gas control valve E to see if it connects to a manual valve C or the control valve E. My guess is a small valve.
    D = Manual valve after the control to shut off gas to the main burner but allows the pilot to remain lit (in operation) for service and testing.
    E = Gas control valve. (Red wire connections) opens and closes based on thermostat input and limit temperature input.
    F = Pilot tube.

    PS. after the gas is turned off, it's not a bad idea to get a brush and vacuum to remove some of the dust.

    Hope this helps

    Thanks for the detailed overview! So all I gotta do is turn off D (manual valve)? Turn it clockwise?
  • EdTheHeaterManEdTheHeaterMan Member Posts: 636
    edited August 2
    Yes, but the pilot may still get gas. This may give you a gas odor if the pilot blows out. Depends on the control valve. it appears that valve "E" is between the main burner and the control. Not meant for shutting the system down for the summer. Only meant for repair service and testing the controls.

    If you blow the pilot out and the gas continues to flow to the pilot burner after 5 minutes, then the pilot has its own separate valve

    You can test this by blowing out the pilot, waiting 5 minutes then take a flame to the pilot burner. if it lights then there is a different valve for the pilot somewhere. Look at where the letter C is pointing to see if there is another valve.

    If it does not light then the pilot is part of the control valve. The instructions for that type of valve are different from the instructions in the third pic. this means the valve is not original
  • EdTheHeaterManEdTheHeaterMan Member Posts: 636
    edited August 2

    LOOK under Control Valve E to see if there is another small valve where C is pointing

  • ch4manch4man Member Posts: 219

    Umm... what's under that scuzzy looking red cover?

    millivolt diaphram gas valve. can see the thermopile and bleed line
  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Member Posts: 12,956
    I got that far, @ch4man -- but the question is, are there shutoff valves for the pilot or main or both as well?
    Br. Jamie, osb

    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.

    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • EdTheHeaterManEdTheHeaterMan Member Posts: 636
    You can always call Sears and give them the model and serial number to see if it is still under warranty. they might even have the booklet on it.


    Back then we did not have instruction manuals... we had "The Booklet"
  • mattmia2mattmia2 Member Posts: 1,443
    Valve D has one more very important function, to keep the main burner from firing while you're lighting the pilot if you take long enough to get your hands out of there that it generates enough current to open the main valve or it turned out to already be lit or still hot.
  • stanstvstanstv Member Posts: 6

    Yes, but the pilot may still get gas. This may give you a gas odor if the pilot blows out. Depends on the control valve. it appears that valve "E" is between the main burner and the control. Not meant for shutting the system down for the summer. Only meant for repair service and testing the controls.

    If you blow the pilot out and the gas continues to flow to the pilot burner after 5 minutes, then the pilot has its own separate valve

    You can test this by blowing out the pilot, waiting 5 minutes then take a flame to the pilot burner. if it lights then there is a different valve for the pilot somewhere. Look at where the letter C is pointing to see if there is another valve.

    If it does not light then the pilot is part of the control valve. The instructions for that type of valve are different from the instructions in the third pic. this means the valve is not original

    I followed the pilot tube and found a small manual valve! (pic attached). I turned it off and then tried turning the main valve (D) but it was really hard to do so. Is it fine to just leave it parallel? I don't plan on using this heater again.


    Thank you! This has been really helpful.
  • stanstvstanstv Member Posts: 6

    Yes, but the pilot may still get gas. This may give you a gas odor if the pilot blows out. Depends on the control valve. it appears that valve "E" is between the main burner and the control. Not meant for shutting the system down for the summer. Only meant for repair service and testing the controls.

    If you blow the pilot out and the gas continues to flow to the pilot burner after 5 minutes, then the pilot has its own separate valve

    You can test this by blowing out the pilot, waiting 5 minutes then take a flame to the pilot burner. if it lights then there is a different valve for the pilot somewhere. Look at where the letter C is pointing to see if there is another valve.

    If it does not light then the pilot is part of the control valve. The instructions for that type of valve are different from the instructions in the third pic. this means the valve is not original

    You're right! C pointed to a small manual valve and I was able to shut off the pilot light (on the picture attached, you can see it on the left hand side of the pilot tube).



    I tried turning off my main gas valve but it was difficult to do so. I'm sure I can do it with a wrench, but I was wondering if I can just leave it, or would it be best to turn off gas? I don't plan on using this heater again.

    Thank you!
  • ratioratio Member Posts: 2,496
    That's a B valve, you can just see the handle, which looks like a "B".

    You should turn off the main valve as well for safety, especially if you don't plan on using it. The valve may be stiff, and it also may only turn one way, so examine it carefully before you throw the wrench on it.

    mattmia2
  • mattmia2mattmia2 Member Posts: 1,443
    Sometimes those valves rely on grease to seal them and can start leaking if the grease has dried out and they haven't been operated in a long time.
  • motoguy128motoguy128 Member Posts: 119
    I wouldn’t touch anything until you find another shut off further up stream. Old valves can leak or break when moved if they haven’t been used in a long time.  Be prepared to shut off gas at the meter if needed.  Doesn’t happen often.  But best to be prepared.  Ball valve after the meter has no handle but will turn with a large crescent wrench.  Have one handy.  
  • EdTheHeaterManEdTheHeaterMan Member Posts: 636
    edited August 5
    stanstv said:


    ... I tried turning off my main gas valve but it was difficult to do so. I'm sure I can do it with a wrench, but I was wondering if I can just leave it, or would it be best to turn off gas? I don't plan on using this heater again.

    Thank you!

    If you are never going to use it again, I suggest that you remove the last fitting on the main gas pipe before the valve and put a cap on the line.

    To do this you need to shut off the gas to the house at the meter, then remove the old valves, put a cap on the pipe with the proper pipe sealant, then you can turn the gas at the meter back on. If you are not comfortable with that, then have a pro do it.

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