Click here to Find a Contractor in your area.
Welcome! Here are the website rules, as well as some tips for using this forum.
Need to contact us? Visit https://heatinghelp.com/contact-us/.

London Apartment Outdoor Waste-Line?

D107
D107 Member Posts: 1,726
edited July 2020 in Plumbing
Surprised to see this given London's winter cold climate.





Comments

  • ratio
    ratio Member Posts: 2,732
    They do all kinds of crazy stuff over there. You should see their electric system!
    mattmia2
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 8,191
    That is very typical there. It is just DWV and should not hold any water. The alternative would be cutting up a lot of masonry structure.

    In Jackson MS, I saw a lot of H & C on the outside of the building.
    Might freeze every 5 years and get replaced in the same manner.

    A brother that lives near there cut his water line by just digging down 15". They can put water heaters in the unheated attics.
    D107
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 2,686
    I believe London also runs many of their mains at very low pressure and you need a water tank and pump in your house as well.
    D107
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 15,411
    It's not just London. Any city or town -- even most of the great palaces. As @ratio noted, you simply don't run water or waste -- or electric or 'phone or cable or anything else through those structure unless you absolutely have to.

    My daughter's flat, when she lived in Edinburgh for a while, was relatively recent -- I seem to recall 1830 or so -- and everything ran up outside (her first flat was older -- 1540).

    And yes, water mains pressure is usually relatively low by our standards, and one has a cistern at some high elevation in the flat or house filled at low pressure through a float valve (just like a US water closet). It's not, however, just for relatively low pressure -- it completely flattens the variations in water pressure, as the demand over a day is quite constant. It does, however, mean that all your valves and fixtures are designed to operate on low pressure -- perhaps 15 psi -- and really don't work well on our higher pressures in North America.

    Never mind the electrics -- 220 volts 50 hertz over there vs. 120 volts 60 hertz here.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
    D107
  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 14,343
    We see this in Baltimore, mostly on rowhouses that are older than indoor plumbing.
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Consulting
    D107
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 8,191
    I have wondered about the WC in these situations.
    It seems a wall hung would be in order.
    Or elevated WC with piping on floor covered maybe by box.
    D107
  • D107
    D107 Member Posts: 1,726
    Found another online; perhaps easier to maintain? Probably less prevalent in the residences of the wealthy due to aesthetics?


  • TAG
    TAG Member Posts: 450
    I own two places in Philadelphia with old style CI outside. One is a trinity the other a typical row -- they both have the second floor bathrooms that exit through the wall to the outside --- 3" pipe down --- turns back into basement and same up to roof for vent.
    Sealed with lead
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 15,411
    I might note that both of the photos are brick... thick brick, but brick. Try it in two foot plus thick solid stone! Some very ingenious plumbing...
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
    Canucker
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!