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NY --> VT Plumbing License Transfer

HVAC_P
HVAC_P Member Posts: 15
Hello everyone,
Long time lurker first post. I have a question regarding obtaining a VT Master Plumber License however my situation is somewhat different than normal.

I have been working at a plumbing shop or the past 8 years in Eastern Rensselaer County (Right near the Vermont border). I am currently licensed as a master plumber in the city of Troy, NY. As everyone knows there is no statewide plumbing license in New York.

I see on the Vermont master license requirements that they do allow "outside the state for 1 year equal to a Vermont Journeyman".

Would a Troy, NY Master License be equivalent to a Vermont journeyman license?

Also while reviewing the list of VT Master Plumbers who live in NY I see that some of the NY guys who live in towns right on the Vermont border have what is listed as a "Special license" not a "Master license" is this some type of class B license?

Any insight would be greatly appreciated this site is full of great knowledge.
Thanks in advance





Comments

  • Tom_133
    Tom_133 Member Posts: 727
    I can speak to the specialist license. Quite a few years back, a guy could install a boiler if he had a gas license but would have to hire a Master to come hook up water. Sadly if the Master was also bidding on that job the price to hook up that water, would hurt your feelings. So the state put together specialist licenses that allow us to hook up water to boilers, and water heaters, and if you want to do water filtration there is one for that too.

    Its still kind of whacky since, a Master is apparently able to work on anything they want under the sun with water in it and their license covers it, specialized licenses are still quite specific.

    There are also several other specialist licenses. Electrical is cool, if you get that you can wire your own boiler.
    Tom
    Montpelier Vt
    Zman
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 15,698
    There's actually a pretty decent historical rationale behind that, @Tom_133 -- but it goes back a long ways. Like 50 years... back then, when I was doing building inspection... and plumbing... and septic systems...and water supplies... and heating systems... and wiring... and who knows what else in Vermont, there were very few Masters in the whole state. For that matter, there weren't all that many people. And the few Masters there were were expected, in their various trade, to be able to anything that came to hand. More people -- and much more regulation -- particularly in the Route 100 valley and the Burlington, Rutland, and Bennington areas, and guys and gals began to specialize. One almost had to. And they weren't always interested in doing all the apprenticeships which were almost routine before. Hence... specialist licenses.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
    kcopp
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 8,800
    I had a Vermont Master Electrician license that I have dropped because I haven't worked there in years. At that time they only had 3 inspectors in the state but they knew there stuff.

    @HVAC-P

    Most states if you have a license out of state they will let you test for the = license

    In my experience get the application and fill it out give them everything you have drown them in paper even if it is stuff they don't ask for.

    Every certificate, training class, education experience, military service, licenses etc even if unrelated send it in.

    Think you will be fine
  • Tom_133
    Tom_133 Member Posts: 727
    We use to have a young lady working in the Montpelier branch of licensing, that you could call and could help you out she really knew her stuff. I guess she moved on. I would start with a phone call to the Division of Fire safety. Perhaps [email protected] Licensing Specialist
    802-479-7564 can help
    Tom
    Montpelier Vt
    kcopp
  • HVAC_P
    HVAC_P Member Posts: 15
    Tom_133 said:

    I can speak to the specialist license. Quite a few years back, a guy could install a boiler if he had a gas license but would have to hire a Master to come hook up water. Sadly if the Master was also bidding on that job the price to hook up that water, would hurt your feelings. So the state put together specialist licenses that allow us to hook up water to boilers, and water heaters, and if you want to do water filtration there is one for that too.

    Its still kind of whacky since, a Master is apparently able to work on anything they want under the sun with water in it and their license covers it, specialized licenses are still quite specific.

    There are also several other specialist licenses. Electrical is cool, if you get that you can wire your own boiler.

    Thank you very much for the informative reply. So just trying to wrap my head around this, So if I for example was licensed in VT for Propane/Natural Gas I could also apply for a Plumbing specialist license in Boiler Piping/Water Heater Piping? Is there testing required for specialist licenses? Also will be contact with VT licensing thank you for the email and phone number.
  • HVAC_P
    HVAC_P Member Posts: 15
    edited May 2020

    There's actually a pretty decent historical rationale behind that, @Tom_133 -- but it goes back a long ways. Like 50 years... back then, when I was doing building inspection... and plumbing... and septic systems...and water supplies... and heating systems... and wiring... and who knows what else in Vermont, there were very few Masters in the whole state. For that matter, there weren't all that many people. And the few Masters there were were expected, in their various trade, to be able to anything that came to hand. More people -- and much more regulation -- particularly in the Route 100 valley and the Burlington, Rutland, and Bennington areas, and guys and gals began to specialize. One almost had to. And they weren't always interested in doing all the apprenticeships which were almost routine before. Hence... specialist licenses.

    Thanks for the in depth reply. You mention that people were not not interested in doing apprenticeships. Do specialist licenses not require apprenticeships/licensing exams? Also I cannot seem to find a list of specialist licenses. Do you happen to know them off hand hand and what is required of them? Thank you!
  • HVAC_P
    HVAC_P Member Posts: 15

    I had a Vermont Master Electrician license that I have dropped because I haven't worked there in years. At that time they only had 3 inspectors in the state but they knew there stuff.

    @HVAC-P

    Most states if you have a license out of state they will let you test for the = license

    In my experience get the application and fill it out give them everything you have drown them in paper even if it is stuff they don't ask for.

    Every certificate, training class, education experience, military service, licenses etc even if unrelated send it in.

    Think you will be fine

    Will do Sir. Started out my career by attending a 2 year Heating and Air Conditioning program at a local community college. Also have my EPA license. Do you think this would be of any help or worth submitting even though it is not directly related to plumbing? Thank you
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 8,800
    @HVAC-P

    Absolutely, submit everything you have. All the states print out there licensing requirements but there are always "special circumstances" especially for someone coming in from out of state.

    For instances let's say your licensed in NY and you want Vermont licensing. Vermont probably list their requirements. There is usually a loop hole for those that don't meet those requirements in that they usually will consider things like other training, military service etc.

    When you move from state to state the requirements change. The states know this and they are not supposed to "put u out of business" or take away your lively hood.

    Most won't hand you a license (although some do) but usually there is a pathway to get to where you want to be
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 15,698
    HVAC_P said:

    There's actually a pretty decent historical rationale behind that, @Tom_133 -- but it goes back a long ways. Like 50 years... back then, when I was doing building inspection... and plumbing... and septic systems...and water supplies... and heating systems... and wiring... and who knows what else in Vermont, there were very few Masters in the whole state. For that matter, there weren't all that many people. And the few Masters there were were expected, in their various trade, to be able to anything that came to hand. More people -- and much more regulation -- particularly in the Route 100 valley and the Burlington, Rutland, and Bennington areas, and guys and gals began to specialize. One almost had to. And they weren't always interested in doing all the apprenticeships which were almost routine before. Hence... specialist licenses.

    Thanks for the in depth reply. You mention that people were not not interested in doing apprenticeships. Do specialist licenses not require apprenticeships/licensing exams? Also I cannot seem to find a list of specialist licenses. Do you happen to know them off hand hand and what is required of them? Thank you!
    It wasn't that folks weren't interested in doing apprenticeships -- they were, and they were required. Problem was that at one time the apprentice training for the Master covered the whole landscape -- and while not difficult to a reasonably handy individual, could be time consuming -- particularly if the Master you were working for concentrated on just one thing -- let's say heating systems, for example. How did you get experience drilling and installing a well? Or a septic system? Or even building water supply and drains work? So the specialist system was set up so you could do your apprenticeship in one or two areas, and get that, and get good work.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • Tom_133
    Tom_133 Member Posts: 727
    https://firesafety.vermont.gov/licensing

    Scroll to the bottom of the page, you will see specialist licenses available.
    Tom
    Montpelier Vt
  • HVAC_P
    HVAC_P Member Posts: 15
    Tom_133 said:

    https://firesafety.vermont.gov/licensing

    Scroll to the bottom of the page, you will see specialist licenses available.

    Thank you for the link I didn't catch those before. For the specialized licensing are apprenticeships required? Not that I am against them in anyway and the only reason I ask is at this point I am in my early 30's and it would be tough to go back and do a 5 year apprenticeship.

    Completely unrelated to any licensing conversation but how do you VT plumbers, Heating/Cooling contractors fare working in VT? I might make a separate thread/conversation for this topic alone.
    Currently the county in NY I am located in has gotten wicked built up (1,000,000 sqft amazon warehouse, developments going in everywhere etc....). Now I know this is good for business but at this point in my career I also want to be in an area that is not a constant chaos mentality. I figure living so close to the VT border I could slowly (after licensing) start taking jobs into VT.

    Feel free anyone to chime in. I cannot thank everyone enough for the super informative replies so far.
  • Tom_133
    Tom_133 Member Posts: 727
    You need a certain amount of experience (cant remember how much) and to take a test for the specialty license.

    I have only worked in Vermont so I have nothing to compare it to. Got lots of work going on, and I only do heating and hot water. Vt is growing fast, hopefully the infrastructure grows as quickly, currently its nice not to sit in traffic, or have to think about traffic delays when going somewhere.
    Tom
    Montpelier Vt
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