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Gas Piping

We were installing a gas seismic valve at the gas meter today and when I was de-threading the nipple out of the wall, it didn't feel right. You know what it's supposed to feel like after you do this for awhile, no? Anyway, just as the nipple got to the last thread, I felt the fitting in the wall slip away.

This is what I saw when I looked through the hole.


8.33 lbs./gal. x 60 min./hr. x 20°ΔT = 10,000 BTU's/hour

Two btu per sq ft for degree difference for a slab

Comments

  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 22,118
    the electrical service grounded to the gas line?
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 11,060
    Or gas line bonded (grounded) to electric service??

    NEC requires any metallic piping, ductwork etc that could be energized to be bonded to the electric grounding electrode system........this is seldom done.....often overlooked.

    Or this was a mechanical clamp/fastener to keep the gas piping from being pulled out too far of the outside wall??
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 15,516
    My eyes are not the best looks like hammer and chisel time. Looks like the nipple broke off in the fitting
    ratio
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 15,664
    I've dethreaded a few things...
    I think you mean unscrewing.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • I'll find out more in the morning when I open up the wall, but i think that's a grounding clamp. Around here, it has to be exposed and not buried in the wall.
    8.33 lbs./gal. x 60 min./hr. x 20°ΔT = 10,000 BTU's/hour

    Two btu per sq ft for degree difference for a slab
  • BillyO
    BillyO Member Posts: 277
    geez, always something. Good luck
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 15,516
    Guess it's the threads looking shiny. Thought the pipe broke






  • 8.33 lbs./gal. x 60 min./hr. x 20°ΔT = 10,000 BTU's/hour

    Two btu per sq ft for degree difference for a slab
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 15,664
    What's the black and red thing on the pipe by the meter?

    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • 8.33 lbs./gal. x 60 min./hr. x 20°ΔT = 10,000 BTU's/hour

    Two btu per sq ft for degree difference for a slab
    ChrisJkcopp
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 15,664
    @Alan (California Radiant) Forbes As you know I'm a DIYer so I'm asking this out of curiosity, not to be insulting.

    I thought you were never supposed to wrench a pipe or nipple without having a wrench on the fitting as well? I don't see how that fitting could have been supported by a wrench without opening the wall before hand.

    Is this more of a "goes by feel" rather than a hard rule?
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • @ChrisJ No problem with the questions.

    You're absolutely right with "backing up" a fitting when screwing in a nipple and in this case, the backing up was done by the rest of the piping in the wall and floor. I could tell that the elbow was fully supported.

    If I'd felt that there would be a problem, I would have removed more sheetrock to make room for a wrench on the pipe or fitting.
    8.33 lbs./gal. x 60 min./hr. x 20°ΔT = 10,000 BTU's/hour

    Two btu per sq ft for degree difference for a slab
  • HomerJSmith
    HomerJSmith Member Posts: 2,438
    edited May 2020
    I always tighten them until they break, then I give'm one more turn.
    ZmankcoppEdTheHeaterMan
  • GW
    GW Member Posts: 4,692
    Chris if the piping is secure, no need for a second wrench. It doesn’t take a lot of torque to tighten a nip. If there’s a chance to unspin something you don’t want to in spin, then yes, two tools

    Identifying “secure” might be a challenge for some people. Just basic leverage stuff
    Gary Wilson
    Wilson Services, Inc
    Northampton, MA
    gary@wilsonph.com
    rick in Alaska