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New tank install help

threepcreepthreepcreep Member Posts: 4
edited March 14 in Oil Heating
Hey fellas. Looking to install a new tank and lines in my home (outdoor tank). I have a few questions. Should I switch from a 2 line system to a single line? If single line, do you recommend a tiger loop? Should I use the bottom line of the tank for supply or come off the top? Lastly, I cant find up to date code (nys) for an outdoor tank install and the code office in my town is closed when I get done work. Anyone have a copy? I really appreciate any input. Thanks.

Comments

  • STEVEusaPASTEVEusaPA Member Posts: 3,950
    edited March 14
    Put it on a pad, not two concrete lentils, pitched toward the bottom outlet.
    Needs to be secured to pad and secured to wall to prevent tipping (unless it's a horizontal tank).
    If it's all gravity (burner is at same height or lower than bottom of tank) I'd do single pipe. If you are switching from 2 pipe to single pipe you must remove the bypass plug in the existing fuel pump, or you'll have to replace the entire pump after running it for about 3 seconds.
    All flare fittings.
    If it were me:
    Angled tank ball valve attached to the bottom of the tank, jacketed oil line.
    Right after it enters the house, firomatic valve, general filter, spin-on filter, OSV, jacketed oil line to burner, firomatic at the burner.
    For initial bleeding I usually take off the oil line right after the OSV, depress the button until I get oil past the filters, release the button. Should hold & a good way to check the OSV. Reconnect oil line then power vacuum bleed.
    Lift job, same as above, forget the OSV, and depending on the lift, maybe a Tiger Loop (probably not).
    Those are the basics.
    I always prefer 1 pipe over 2 pipe, but others ;) feel differently.
    Treat the oil to prevent sludge/freezing. If you're in a climate that gets very cold (frequent highs under 15°) the tank should be inside or then you may want the Tiger Loop to 'warm up the oil' (in quotes on purpose). Better would be a nozzle line heater.
    steve
    threepcreepIronmanHVACNUT
  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Member Posts: 12,327
    Unless you like to live very dangerously, you really have only two choices: either the tank sits in a containment basin (concrete) with a volume sufficient to hold the entire contents of the tank without overflow -- not just a pad -- or the tank is double walled, with some means of alarm if the inner tank leaks into the outer containment tank.

    Whether your local code requires that or not is another matter -- it may not -- but the cost is worth it; if you had a spill for some reason, the cost of assessment and cleanup would be somewhere between high and astronomical.
    Br. Jamie, osb

    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.

    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • SteamheadSteamhead Member Posts: 13,663

    Unless you like to live very dangerously, you really have only two choices: either the tank sits in a containment basin (concrete) with a volume sufficient to hold the entire contents of the tank without overflow -- not just a pad -- or the tank is double walled, with some means of alarm if the inner tank leaks into the outer containment tank.

    Whether your local code requires that or not is another matter -- it may not -- but the cost is worth it; if you had a spill for some reason, the cost of assessment and cleanup would be somewhere between high and astronomical.

    This.

    Roth and Granby both make double-walled tanks.
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    "Reducing our country's energy consumption, one system at a time"
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Baltimore, MD (USA) and consulting anywhere.
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/all-steamed-up-inc
  • HVACNUTHVACNUT Member Posts: 3,049
    I used to use 1 1/4" x 10.5"
    galvanized nips for the high end, 1 1/4" x 10" on the valve end. 1 1/4", 4 bolt flanges as feet. Secure the feet to the slab.
    There are anchoring kits available.
    If there is means for gravity flow (not siphon) I would also go one pipe, as long as there isn't much exposed outside oil line. Insulate any exterior oil line.
  • weedhopperweedhopper Member Posts: 22
    I am not a heating guy but I have a landscaping customer who has an insulated jacket for his outside tank. Vinyl, about an inch thick made for a tank with cutouts, etc. slows down condensation.

    Dark gray, not conspicuous.
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