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Hot Water Heater is Leaking

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Comments

  • SuperTech
    SuperTech Member Posts: 1,715
    I believe that is a check valve.
  • delta T
    delta T Member Posts: 864
    @rick in Alaska

    2018 IPC:

    "607.3 Thermal Expansion control. Where a storage water heater is supplied with cold water that passes through a check valve, pressure reducing valve, or backflow preventer, a thermal expansion control device shall be connected to the water heater cold water supply pipe at a point that is downstream of all check valves, pressure reducing valves and backflow preventers...."

    So, yeah you are correct, you can put it upstream of the shutoff valve, it not being a check valve, PRV, or BFP. My AHJ is a stickler for always wanting it downstream of the shutoff valve. Maybe I'll argue with him next time! :D
  • delta T
    delta T Member Posts: 864
    @FredoSP @pecmsg

    Yes that is a check valve.

    There also appears to be a backflow preventer on your main water coming into the house. This likely fulfills the requirement for your utility, but it would be a good idea to have something better than a little swing check like that protecting against back-siphonage of the irrigation system. I would imagine you have a vacuum breaker outside the house on that supply line for the irrigation? That is the common practice in my neck of the woods.
    SuperTechmattmia2
  • pecmsg
    pecmsg Member Posts: 2,561
    delta T said:

    @FredoSP @pecmsg

    Yes that is a check valve.

    There also appears to be a backflow preventer on your main water coming into the house. This likely fulfills the requirement for your utility, but it would be a good idea to have something better than a little swing check like that protecting against back-siphonage of the irrigation system. I would imagine you have a vacuum breaker outside the house on that supply line for the irrigation? That is the common practice in my neck of the woods.

    That back flow on the main is fine for protecting the City water but will do nothing for the buildings supply. A separate backflow protector is required on the sprinkler line.
    delta T
  • FredoSP
    FredoSP Member Posts: 72


    FredoSP said:


    ...Care to inform me what's wrong with the flue pipe?...

    You need straight flue pipe off the draft hood (12” min I think). You can’t have an elbow on the draft hood.
    Could the install have been done before this was code? Just taking a shot in the dark.
    Long Island, NY
  • FredoSP
    FredoSP Member Posts: 72
    JUGHNE said:

    If you add a pressure reducing valve for the entire house, (and you probably should as that 80+ PSI beats up the washer, dishwasher, ice maker and toilet valves) you should readjust accordingly.

    Where would be the best spot to add the pressure reducing valve? Probably after the back flow device? I'm pretty sure my sprinkler system likes the water pressure.
    Long Island, NY
  • STEVEusaPA
    STEVEusaPA Member Posts: 5,446
    FredoSP said:


    FredoSP said:


    ...Care to inform me what's wrong with the flue pipe?...

    You need straight flue pipe off the draft hood (12” min I think). You can’t have an elbow on the draft hood.
    Could the install have been done before this was code? Just taking a shot in the dark.
    I doubt it. The installer probably did was was easy.
    steve
  • icy78
    icy78 Member Posts: 397
    Also, water heater flue looks horizontal. Not good.
    I'd probably valve it off and have you sign that you've been told of the dangers of running it.

    Although it is interesting that I don't see any sign of flu spillage. At least on the plastic escutcheon that one can see. Was the flue pipe changed recently? That all looks new.

    Is PEX directly out of a water heater Okay? I'm curious.
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 4,321
    If the chimney is tall enough and narrow enough it might draft ok even though it isn't correct.
  • STEVEusaPA
    STEVEusaPA Member Posts: 5,446
    mattmia2 said:

    If the chimney is tall enough and narrow enough it might draft ok even though it isn't correct.

    Not a good defense if the house burns down, or CO spills into the home sickening or killing someone.
    I'd bet if you stuck my personal CO monitor on top of that water heater, especially on a windy day, you'd quickly see numbers over 100ppm.
    steve
  • icy78
    icy78 Member Posts: 397
    > @mattmia2 said:
    > If the chimney is tall enough and narrow enough it might draft ok even though it isn't correct.

    With a drafthood, too much draft causes flue gas spillage.
    STEVEusaPA
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 4,321
    I didn't say you should leave it that way, just that it may be working.

    When you figure maybe 25% of water heaters are installed by someone licensed and of those 25% probably 80% are plumbers, most aren't installed by someone who knows the venting part of the fuel gas code the way someone with a mechanical license would.
  • FredoSP
    FredoSP Member Posts: 72
    icy78 said:

    Also, water heater flue looks horizontal. Not good.

    I'd probably valve it off and have you sign that you've been told of the dangers of running it.



    Although it is interesting that I don't see any sign of flu spillage. At least on the plastic escutcheon that one can see. Was the flue pipe changed recently? That all looks new.



    Is PEX directly out of a water heater Okay? I'm curious.

    Flue pipe hasn't been touched in years. If I was to bet, the last time it was touched was when the water heater was installed and that was in 2007/2008.

    The PEX replaced copper pipe above the hot water heater in August 2019, no issues that I can see with leaking or anything.
    Long Island, NY
  • FredoSP
    FredoSP Member Posts: 72

    mattmia2 said:

    If the chimney is tall enough and narrow enough it might draft ok even though it isn't correct.

    Not a good defense if the house burns down, or CO spills into the home sickening or killing someone.
    I'd bet if you stuck my personal CO monitor on top of that water heater, especially on a windy day, you'd quickly see numbers over 100ppm.
    I do have two CO monitors in the basement, close to the water heater and oil burner. No issues that I know of. I think the limit of CO is 50 ppm for it to be safe?
    Long Island, NY