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VT2218 power source

So I got this fancy new taco pump and the only pumps I worked with before were wires to a controller which powered on pumps as needed but this pump has the lcd screen and all that fancy stuff and will be used with zone valves. Instructions are pretty vague and I can’t make out if this gets wired to a steady 110v source or wired to the circulator pump end switch on the zone controller. It wouldn’t make much sense to have the pump constantly have to reboot the computer so I assume it needs it’s own constant power. Can anyone verify this for me? It’s probably a silly question but these pumps are new to me. Thank you

Comments

  • Zman
    Zman Member Posts: 7,330
    It can be set up either way. If you are piped so that you need the circ to turn off at times (DHW priority) you need it to be switched. In other cases, it is up to the installer.
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
  • Leon82
    Leon82 Member Posts: 684
    It remembers it's settings on power down. But does ramp up then down when in Delta t mode
  • ch4man
    ch4man Member Posts: 261
    I'd recommend providing constant power and use a RIB relay on the 120V coil and NO contacts to run it.
    maybe Taco can handle constant reboots but we've seen more than a few B&G ecocirc XLs fail prematurely when allowed to reboot every cycle
  • nickmg555
    nickmg555 Member Posts: 16
    I will be using delta T mode and figure it will likely idle down when the supply temp cools off. I think I will start with it directly wired. I have a power supply junction box only about a foot away from my zone controller which is only 2 feet from the pump so it wouldn’t kill me to switch it if need be but I like the idea of the computer always on. It just seems like a horrible idea restarting it all the time especially on a system with 4 thermostats(zones)
  • Dave H_2
    Dave H_2 Member Posts: 503
    Why would you want it powered when there is no longer a call for heat? Or in the summer, all day, all night?
    I doesn't turn off when the zone valves are closed if you hard-wire the circ, the VT2218 has a minimum run speed of 9 watts.

    You are doing much better on cycle count with a 4-zone system with zone valves rather than zone pumps. And with it in the Delta-T mode, you are going to get longer run times which will equate to more comfort, it will only pump what is needed in the home. Couple that to outdoor reset and now your system is singing.

    My 2 cents and how I have it wired in my house, to a relay.

    Dave H.
    Dave H
  • nickmg555
    nickmg555 Member Posts: 16
    It’s too bad it won’t just shutoff at a determined supply temp. I have always had the notion that it’s not good to be constantly power cycling computers and electronics. But if it doesn’t “idle” then pump relay it is I suppose. It may very well be running 24/7 anyways considering the old building and cold climate. Are you on the original pump(had to replace? How long have you had it installed?

    > @Dave H_2 said:
    > Why would you want it powered when there is no longer a call for heat? Or in the summer, all day, all night?
    > I doesn't turn off when the zone valves are closed if you hard-wire the circ, the VT2218 has a minimum run speed of 9 watts.
    >
    > You are doing much better on cycle count with a 4-zone system with zone valves rather than zone pumps. And with it in the Delta-T mode, you are going to get longer run times which will equate to more comfort, it will only pump what is needed in the home. Couple that to outdoor reset and now your system is singing.
    >
    > My 2 cents and how I have it wired in my house, to a relay.
    >
    > Dave H.
  • pecmsg
    pecmsg Member Posts: 2,881
    Contact TACO. In this energy saving environment I cant believe they do not have a set of dry contacts for control signal!

    I know the larger Viridian pumps do.
  • Dave H_2
    Dave H_2 Member Posts: 503
    @pecmsg We don't put the contacts in the smaller circs for lots of reasons, but cost is one of them since most projects that utilize a circ of this size is already going to have a relay or two or does not have a BMS installed.

    @nickmg555 I have it installed since the beginning, around 6 years ago. It's on my radiant floor system with 5 zones. You will see it running more often than not because of the combinations of zones that have the potential to call for heat.

    We (Taco) design circulators for a minimum cycle count of 250,000 cycles. In a zone pump application, we estimate that to be around 18 years of life. When in a zone valve application, that life span will be longer.

    What type of heat is in your project? If hi-temp, I would add outdoor reset so that the water temp modulates, the pump modulates; and you will get longer run cycles of the circ.

    Dave H.
    Dave H
    pecmsgSuperJ
  • Zman
    Zman Member Posts: 7,330
    After giving this some more thought, I think that a delta T circ with no means of moving water (zone valves closed) should not be energized unless the manufacturer has recommended it. The circ will likely continue to attempt to move water in order to satisfy sensors which cannot "see" the efforts of the circ.
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 16,287
    Would you buy a 300 hp truck then add a "governor" to limit it to 100- 150 hp?
    Isn't that exactly what a constrained ∆T operation is? Limiting output so the boiler can run longer, and maybe, in some cases fall behind the load?

    Is there a mechanism to control the pump if constantly powered with all ZVs closed. Seems like it would see a ∆T change and try to increase it's output, speed up, against closed valves? I think you want it to only run when a zone calls.

    Just sure to understand the thermodynamics behind a constrained ∆T distribution control logic, with ODR especially.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
    Zman
  • Zman
    Zman Member Posts: 7,330
    Thanks for the screenshots. That is a difficult concept to explain. The visual really helps.
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
  • nickmg555
    nickmg555 Member Posts: 16
    So I have it wired to the pump end switch. 4 zone valves. Zone 4 priority is off so they all operate Independently yet only when zone 4 calls for heat does the relay click on and turn the pump on. I’m wired exactly as the wiring diagram calls but only get power with zone 4
  • nickmg555
    nickmg555 Member Posts: 16
    When all set and done it will be 4 small apartments each with its own zone and heated by Panel radiators. Boiler is a mascot ii and everything will be sized to run at 140 with a delta T of 20. Everything is coming together but the taco pump will only operate on zone 4. I am using a brand new taco 4 zone controller with zone 4 priority turned to off. When zone 4 calls the relay clicks and pump comes on. When zone 3 calls it quickly clicks and the screen lights up and shuts right back off and the other 2 zones have no effect on the relay or pump. I’m hoping the zone controller isn’t defective as I bought it to replace the defective taco zone controller that was already in place.
    > @Dave H_2 said:
    > @nickmg555 I have it installed since the beginning, around 6 years ago. It's on my radiant floor system with 5 zones. You will see it running more often than not because of the combinations of zones that have the potential to call for heat.
    >
    > We (Taco) design circulators for a minimum cycle count of 250,000 cycles. In a zone pump application, we estimate that to be around 18 years of life. When in a zone valve application, that life span will be longer.
    >
    > What type of heat is in your project? If hi-temp, I would add outdoor reset so that the water temp modulates, the pump modulates; and you will get longer run cycles of the circ.
    >
    > Dave H.