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Punctured in floor heat line.

djc2232
djc2232 Member Posts: 136
Go figure. The contractor renovating my bathroom punctured one of my staple up in floor heat lines cutting a drain in the floor. Even after me telling them multiple times.

Luckily it's on the smallest zone. Didn't loose much water and pressure is back up to normal. System is a WM ECO 70 boiler with two zones.

He spliced it with a brass fitting and two metal clips. All appears ok. Similar brass fittings and clips used on the other **** off valves throughout the system.

What I want to know is what else should I do? Should I replace the entire loop? Or will purging that loop and running the WM cleaner and inhibitor be ok? Will send a pic of the splice when they are finished for the day.

Comments

  • JohnNY
    JohnNY Member Posts: 3,057
    edited June 2019
    Don't worry about it. As long as the repair is done well it'll last indefinitely.

    That's said, I hate couplings.
    Contact John "JohnNY" Cataneo, NYC Master Plumber, Lic 1784
    Consulting
    Plumbing in NYC or in NJ.
    Take his class.
  • djc2232
    djc2232 Member Posts: 136
    I think so too. My system runs right around 12psi and that zone doesn't run too often. (good insulation). So I'm not too worried of it popping.

    Somewhere I've read that if there's a leak/puncture in that section to replace it. Not sure if that's true for this set up. Thanks
  • Alan (California Radiant) Forbes
    Alan (California Radiant) Forbes Member Posts: 3,509
    edited June 2019
    "Don't worry about it. As long as the repair is done well it'll last indefinitely."
    ...
    8.33 lbs./gal. x 60 min./hr. x 20°ΔT = 10,000 BTU's/hour
  • Ironman
    Ironman Member Posts: 7,085
    There’s no need to replace the entire loop if the coupling was done right.

    I don’t know where you got that info, but it’s bogus.

    The internet can be a real fountain of mis-information.
    Bob Boan
    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.
  • JohnNY
    JohnNY Member Posts: 3,057
    Ironman said:

    There’s no need to replace the entire loop if the coupling was done right.



    I don’t know where you got that info, but it’s bogus.



    The internet can be a real fountain of mis-information.

    It's not bogus. If you have an opinion, share it. I've been installing radiant heat and snow melting since the mid-'90s. The couplings make the same joint as the manifold fittings. If the manifold connections don't leak, why would the splice joints.
    Contact John "JohnNY" Cataneo, NYC Master Plumber, Lic 1784
    Consulting
    Plumbing in NYC or in NJ.
    Take his class.
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 18,265
    Hopefully with a repair coupling that was made for the tube? Not a NAPA fitting and clamp :)

    Is it black or orange rubber tube under the floor, or pex plastic tube? The tube is stapled below the floor, still accessible?
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
  • djc2232
    djc2232 Member Posts: 136
    Here's what the guy did. To me it looks ok.
  • JohnNY
    JohnNY Member Posts: 3,057
    This is a proper repair coupling:
    http://bostonheatingsupply.com/a4010313.aspx
    Contact John "JohnNY" Cataneo, NYC Master Plumber, Lic 1784
    Consulting
    Plumbing in NYC or in NJ.
    Take his class.
  • djc2232
    djc2232 Member Posts: 136
    > @hot_rod said:
    > Hopefully with a repair coupling that was made for the tube? Not a NAPA fitting and clamp :)
    >
    > Is it black or orange rubber tube under the floor, or pex plastic tube? The tube is stapled below the floor, still accessible?


    Orange pex stapled up below floor as you see in the pic above. And is accessible via the crawl space.
  • djc2232
    djc2232 Member Posts: 136
    > @JohnNY said:
    > This is a proper repair coupling:
    > http://bostonheatingsupply.com/a4010313.aspx

    Hard to tell what coupling was used but it looks similar to this.
  • Intplm.
    Intplm. Member Posts: 1,417
    Have seen and have used both pictured fittings shown above. I understand your concern but I would not worry about it.
  • Ironman
    Ironman Member Posts: 7,085
    JohnNY said:

    Ironman said:

    There’s no need to replace the entire loop if the coupling was done right.



    I don’t know where you got that info, but it’s bogus.



    The internet can be a real fountain of mis-information.

    It's not bogus. If you have an opinion, share it. I've been installing radiant heat and snow melting since the mid-'90s. The couplings make the same joint as the manifold fittings. If the manifold connections don't leak, why would the splice joints.
    @johnNY
    I'm not quite following you. The OP said that he had heard that the entire loop needed replacing. That was what I was referring to as bogus.

    Bob Boan
    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.
    Rich_49
  • JohnNY
    JohnNY Member Posts: 3,057
    @Ironman, sorry buddy. I misunderstood. Cheers.
    Contact John "JohnNY" Cataneo, NYC Master Plumber, Lic 1784
    Consulting
    Plumbing in NYC or in NJ.
    Take his class.
    IronmanZmanRich_49
  • djc2232
    djc2232 Member Posts: 136
    Now fellas lol.

    Ran the boiler and got the air out of that section. No leaks. Should be good to go.
    Intplm.
  • HomerJSmith
    HomerJSmith Member Posts: 1,927
    It appears to be Pex B with sharkbite or Apollo coupling with Apollo clamps. It will work. I always cover the joint with shrink sleeve if buried in gypcrete, etc., and measure the location of the fix and photograph it. If the tube is Pex A, I use Uponor ProPex fittings.
    djc2232