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Removing Radiator inlet fitting.

brandonf
brandonf Member Posts: 197
edited May 2019 in Strictly Steam
I want to reuse this Spud on another radiator with its matching valve. I don't have a spud wrench and I have a feeling the tabs would break off anyway. I'm thinking about removing the reducing fitting out of the radiator.
The radiator I'm putting it into is the same Brand, model line, EDR, and inlet size.
Any tips?
Should I heat it with a torch?
My thoughts were to lay the radiator down and throw a pipe wrench on there and step on the pipe wrench. another thought would be to find the correct large socket on a breaker bar. I'm open to any suggestions.
Homeowner, Entrepreneur, Mechanic, Electrician,

"The toes you step on today are connected to the butt you'll have to kiss tomorrow". ---Vincent "Buddy" Cianci

Comments

  • Ironman
    Ironman Member Posts: 6,869
    First, buy a new valve and spud. They're not that expensive and you gonna mangle the spud getting it out.

    Put a large pipe wrench on the shoulder of the spud and try and remove it. If the brass is soft, you may have to keep running the wrench over the shoulder until the wrench can get a bite on it. Use at least a 24 or 36" wrench and a cheater bar if necessary.

    If that doesn't get it, cut the nut off so you can get a better bite.

    If that still doesn't work, make very careful cuts on the inside of the spud with a metal blade while being extremely careful not to cut into the threads of the radiator. Then cave in the spud with chisel or thick screw driver.

    This is something that we deal with regularly, in fact we just did four of them today. I'd leave the bushing alone and don't recommend using a torch. If you can't break it loose with a large pipe wrench and a cheater, cut it out.

    If you accidentally cut into the radiator threads, lets us know and I'll post how to fix that.
    Bob Boan
    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.
  • brandonf
    brandonf Member Posts: 197
    A new valve and Spud is what I was trying to avoid. Haha.
    I want to remove the reducing bushing with the Spud in place and screw it into the other radiator. I get the feeling I'm not going to find a valve that's the exact same height.
    Homeowner, Entrepreneur, Mechanic, Electrician,

    "The toes you step on today are connected to the butt you'll have to kiss tomorrow". ---Vincent "Buddy" Cianci
  • Ironman
    Ironman Member Posts: 6,869
    Think about the order they went in: the bushing, then the spud. The reverse is how they'll come out.

    The spud is brass on iron (dielectric), but the bushing is iron on iron. Probably been there for about 100 years.

    I'd get a new valve and compare it to the old. It might not be that much difference in height, or the piping may give enough to compensate.
    Bob Boan
    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 9,765
    You might have a little lift in the riser pipe, most new valves are shorter then the old ones.

    Your reducer fitting is iron/steel into cast iron, tough to get out.
    Brass out of steel is in itself a challenge after steam welding.
  • brandonf
    brandonf Member Posts: 197
    😥
    Homeowner, Entrepreneur, Mechanic, Electrician,

    "The toes you step on today are connected to the butt you'll have to kiss tomorrow". ---Vincent "Buddy" Cianci
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 12,010
    What @Ironman said
  • HydroNiCK
    HydroNiCK Member Posts: 129
    Mix 50% ATF and 50% acetone then spray it on. Let it soak in then hit it with an impact wrench.
  • ethicalpaul
    ethicalpaul Member Posts: 3,739
    > @brandonf said:
    > 😥

    I’m curious to know why you are so reluctant to get a new valve? Care to share?
    1 pipe Peerless 63-03L in Cedar Grove, NJ, coal > oil > NG
  • brandonf
    brandonf Member Posts: 197
    > @ethicalpaul said:
    > > @brandonf said:
    > > 😥
    >
    > I’m curious to know why you are so reluctant to get a new valve? Care to share?

    Try not to spend any more money. And I highly doubt I'll find a valve thats exactly the same height as the old one. Although I have to remove the valve anyway because I have to point the rad in the opposite direction. I think I may have to suck it up.
    Homeowner, Entrepreneur, Mechanic, Electrician,

    "The toes you step on today are connected to the butt you'll have to kiss tomorrow". ---Vincent "Buddy" Cianci
    ethicalpaul
  • brandonf
    brandonf Member Posts: 197
    If I decide to go there replacement direction are there any brands I should avoid as far as quality is concerned?
    Homeowner, Entrepreneur, Mechanic, Electrician,

    "The toes you step on today are connected to the butt you'll have to kiss tomorrow". ---Vincent "Buddy" Cianci
  • ethicalpaul
    ethicalpaul Member Posts: 3,739
    Believe it or not I like the HD or Amazon ones. You know you basically never close these things, they might as well be elbows as far as I’m concerned. Someone else will make a case for the really expensive ones. I’m going to try one of those one day.
    1 pipe Peerless 63-03L in Cedar Grove, NJ, coal > oil > NG
  • Gordo
    Gordo Member Posts: 797
    @brandonf : Here is my suggestion of a steam radiator valve brand that may best be avoided:
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    "Reducing our country's energy consumption, one system at a time"
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Baltimore, MD (USA) and consulting anywhere.
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/all-steamed-up-inc
  • Danny Scully
    Danny Scully Member Posts: 1,334
    I’ve been loving marsh valves lately.