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Boiler feed pump cost

I have an old steam system and I believe that my boiler feed pump/tank is leaking water. I have to replace a return pipe in my basement floor that is in concrete that drains into the boiler feed tank which is also below floor level. However, i received one price on just the feed tank/pump not including labor of roughly $8,000. Is that normal. It seems very high to me. Anyone have suggestions for me?

Comments

  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 10,324
    Can't talk price here.

    Depends on the price of the tank & labor.
  • mdweaver
    mdweaver Member Posts: 9
    i'm just wondering if maybe i'm looking for the wrong parts. Just looking for a cheaper solution i don't need specific prices.
  • pecmsg
    pecmsg Member Posts: 2,340
    Quality Costs!

    Is that a good Price around here it could be great but I don't know what pump(s)?
  • One solution might be to do without the tank and pump all together. That would be a gravity return boiler. In the beginning, the systems were all gravity return.
    A good steam pro should be able to determine a course of action on that. Also most boiler installation manuals will show piping diagrams.—NBC
  • mdweaver
    mdweaver Member Posts: 9
    I think i would lose too much water from the boiler and it would shut down while waiting for the condensate to return without the extra water in the boiler feed unit
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 17,101
    mdweaver said:

    I think i would lose too much water from the boiler and it would shut down while waiting for the condensate to return without the extra water in the boiler feed unit

    Say again? If the returns are that slow, you would benefit from cleaning them out... If this is a really big system -- big enough so that the volume of the system is significant in relation to the water in the boiler -- then another approach is a simple gravity tank at the water line elevation to add volume.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • Pumpguy
    Pumpguy Member Posts: 502
    Underground return lines are commonly a problem. IMO, it's best to avoid them if at all possible.

    There are many ways around them, but it all depends on what type of system you have, and how it's laid out.

    For best quality, you should look at a cast iron receiving tank. Many manufacturers offer them with a 20 year warranty against corrosion failure.

    I would be happy to discuss this with you if you'd care to give me a call. We can discuss all the details including prices.

    Our phone # and much other information is available at our website www.nashjenningspumps.com.
    Dennis Pataki. Former Service Manager and Heating Pump Product Manager for Nash Engineering Company. Phone: 1-888 853 9963
    Website: www.nashjenningspumps.com

    The first step in solving any problem is TO IDENTIFY THE PROBLEM.