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Gas meters installation

Hen
Hen Member Posts: 56
Hi,
PSEG (Northern NJ) has been installing new pipes in the area. They also moved gas meters from basements to outside.
They installed my gas meters only about 10 inches above ground. Does not seem safe in case of snow, etc.
What is the minimum height required for gas meters installation on the outside pls? Thank you

Comments

  • STEVEusaPA
    STEVEusaPA Member Posts: 5,967
    I don't know, I'm sure mine is lower. Don't think it's a problem.
    steve
  • ratio
    ratio Member Posts: 3,332
    The meter will work fine buried in snow. Not too easy for the meter reader; but Meh, they're a sub around here so no one cares.

    The vent on the regulator, OTOH...

  • STEVEusaPA
    STEVEusaPA Member Posts: 5,967
    ratio said:

    The meter will work fine buried in snow. Not too easy for the meter reader; but Meh, they're a sub around here so no one cares.

    The vent on the regulator, OTOH...

    Usually read remotely
    steve
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 13,099
    the meters belong to them so if it doesn't work it's their fault. They only comply with utility regulations usually.

    My concern would be water getting into a regulator vent if there is one
  • Hen
    Hen Member Posts: 56
    Thank you for all the comments. My primary concern was that the shutoff for the gas coming into the house is also outside. With snow drifts I've had two good feet of snow on the front lawn in that area in years past. So if you need to shut it off in an emergency and the shutoff valve is buried.. and it is not obvious where it is buried in snow.. and maybe the snow is packed due to freezing wheather.. etc, etc.. that could be a problem.
  • Brewbeer
    Brewbeer Member Posts: 616
    yeah, the gas company sends a yearly reminder to " ... keep the meter free of ice and snow. ..."
    Hydronics inspired homeowner with self-designed high efficiency low temperature baseboard system and professionally installed mod-con boiler with indirect DHW. My system design thread: http://forum.heatinghelp.com/discussion/154385
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  • Hen
    Hen Member Posts: 56
    There is a new regulator installed there now. They said they were installing high pressure lines..
  • Leonard
    Leonard Member Posts: 903
    edited February 2019
    If can't see meter put tall metal pipe in ground next to it so you can find it to dig it out, did that for city water shut off valve

    That close to ground I'ld be bit concern with water melt dripping off roof splashing on vent and freezing. Had that happen when melt hit propane tank and splashed in onto reg vent. Rain splash zone is about 2.5 ft above what ever horizontal surface it hits. Look at mud splashes on wall, they go up ~ 2.5 ft.
  • Intplm.
    Intplm. Member Posts: 1,417
    The bigger concern to me is the regulator. It needs to have a clear path to atmosphere so the diaphragm can move.
  • Leonard
    Leonard Member Posts: 903
    edited February 2019
    I was talking about reg's vent, here remember seeing one next to meter sometimes. Do meters have vents? Internal reg maybe?

    Somewhere think I've seen downward facing funnels, thinking about it reg's vent line might be in that.

    For my relative's ice'd up reg vent on propane tank I temporarily made up a splash shield "funnel" from few layers of aluminum foil
  • Tim McElwain
    Tim McElwain Member Posts: 4,553
    It is the responsibility of the homeowner to keep the meter and regulator free of snow and ice. If you are worried build a little roof above the meter setup. Meters are very forgiving and are actually temperature compensated so that the meter functions for measurement as those the temp is always 60 degrees (F). Keep the vent on the regulator clear so it can breathe. This from the old gas man with over 60 years in the gas industry.