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Prefabbed in the shop

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Tinman
Tinman Member Posts: 2,808
edited April 2018 in THE MAIN WALL

to replace the rat's nest I posted yesterday. The two boiler pipes will go right into the side of a KHN which will be turned 90 degrees from the old Dunkirk. I pre-pipe almost every job now. The amount of labor saved is incredible. Not one trip to the truck for a fitting.
Steve Minnich
JohnNYkcopphappydaveratioRich_49margsuarezHarvey RamerSolid_Fuel_ManNew England SteamWorksGordylchmbSuperTechZmanRoohollahErin Holohan HaskellChrisJ

Comments

  • STEVEusaPA
    STEVEusaPA Member Posts: 6,505
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    Very nice!
    How about a video of you soldering? Probably the nicest soldering most people have ever seen.

    There was an error rendering this rich post.

    TinmankcoppSolid_Fuel_Man
  • Gordy
    Gordy Member Posts: 9,546
    edited April 2018
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    One trip down the steps is huge. Nice job, and very intuitive Stephen.
    Tinman
  • Tinman
    Tinman Member Posts: 2,808
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    Thank you, Steve! No, I have no desire to be a YouTube guy. I'm a complete nerd when I solder, locked in 100% on the joint I'm working on.
    Steve Minnich
    Rich_49
  • Tinman
    Tinman Member Posts: 2,808
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    Thanks Gordy! Gotta save steps when you're working alone.
    Steve Minnich
  • Danny Scully
    Danny Scully Member Posts: 1,427
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    You want to talk about labor savings @Stephen Minnich, start using propress! :wink:
  • Gordy
    Gordy Member Posts: 9,546
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    Funny I’m working at a new construction hospital. You won’t find a pro press fitting on the site. Hmmmm is that saying something about longevity.........
    Solid_Fuel_ManSuperTech
  • Tinman
    Tinman Member Posts: 2,808
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    @Danny Scully - I bought a Ridgid RP340. I'm using up all my sweat fittings for prefab in the shop.
    Steve Minnich
    Rich_49
  • Dan Foley
    Dan Foley Member Posts: 1,258
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    Beautiful work, Stephen.
    TinmanDanny Scullyratio
  • JohnNY
    JohnNY Member Posts: 3,231
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    Outstanding!
    Contact John "JohnNY" Cataneo, NYC Master Plumber, Lic 1784
    Consulting & Troubleshooting
    Heating in NYC or NJ.
    Classes
    Tinman
  • ScottSecor
    ScottSecor Member Posts: 863
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    Very nice work.

    May have to start doing the same at out shop, makes a lot of sense and saves a lot of steps up and down the stairs.
    Tinman
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 15,628
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    Impeccable!! Nice job
    Tinman
  • unclejohn
    unclejohn Member Posts: 1,833
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    I'm impressed
    Tinman
  • Gordy
    Gordy Member Posts: 9,546
    edited April 2018
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    When you have to do a double take to see if the joints were even soldered. You are the master artisan.
    Canuckerdelta T
  • Tinman
    Tinman Member Posts: 2,808
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    I think its more of a sickness than anything : )
    Steve Minnich
    ratioZmandelta T
  • Harvey Ramer
    Harvey Ramer Member Posts: 2,239
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    Very nice, Stephen! I wish I could solder like that.

    Prefabbing in the shop is definitely the way to go whenever you can. The time savings is incredible.
    Tinman
  • Solid_Fuel_Man
    Solid_Fuel_Man Member Posts: 2,646
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    I don't think you actually soldered that....looks like a silver Sharpie was used..... hmmmmmm.
    Serving Northern Maine HVAC & Controls. I burn wood, it smells good!
    Tinman
  • Alan (California Radiant) Forbes
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    A thing of beauty, Stephen. But I don't understand the two zone valves at the end. Are they returns from the high temperature loop?
    And your two mixed zones, slab-on-grade and something else?
    I'm with you on pre-fab.
    8.33 lbs./gal. x 60 min./hr. x 20°ΔT = 10,000 BTU's/hour

    Two btu per sq ft for degree difference for a slab
    Tinman
  • Tinman
    Tinman Member Posts: 2,808
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    Yes, the return on the left is for the high temp. It was the easiest place to fit it. The high temp loop is for bonus room that runs above the driveway from the house to one of the garages. So, it has an exposed floor with thick padding and carpeting.
    Steve Minnich
  • GroundUp
    GroundUp Member Posts: 1,926
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    Man, I wish at least one of my jobs would allow pre-fab. Seems there is never room to set a panel in place, everything is always a jumble. This looks great!
    TinmanSuperTech
  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 16,901
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    Gordy said:

    When you have to do a double take to see if the joints were even soldered. You are the master artisan.

    This. Well done.
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    Towson, MD, USA
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Consulting
    Tinman
  • FinishGuy
    FinishGuy Member Posts: 31
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    I knew my amateur soldering skills lacked but now I really know. Kudos, sir.

    2 questions, if I may.

    - Were you in the midst of a leak-down test when the photograph was taken?

    - About much does such a prefab panel weigh? Curious how you will manage it going down those stairs. I would be calling the buddies for help. In a pinch maybe strapping it to a small dollie and easing the assembly down a ramp...
    1916 two-family, now condo. Top floor. 970 sq. ft. of ‘well ventilated’ space. One-pipe, parallel flow, gas fired steam heat. 27’ of 2” main (un-insulated) vented via Gorton #2. 27’ 1 1/2” dry return (un-insulated) vented by Dole #5. 7 HB Smith Princess 2 col. radiators (38” tall) & 1 ARCo 30s era thin-tube 6 x 8 sec. (32” tall) = total radiator EDR 244. Using Maid-o-Mist radiator vents, sized by calc. & 14 winters tinkering. 1980 HB Smith G210-S-5 rated output 120,000 btu, poor near boiler piping.
    Tinman
  • Zman
    Zman Member Posts: 7,573
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    I have done 3 this way. 2 were closet installations that would have been awful to work in. The other was a long distance job that was an hour away from the nearest supply house and 3 hours from home. On the later, the system was too big so we broke it into 3 pieces (2 walls) and just didn't sweat the connecting fittings.

    None of them came out as nice as this one. Nice work!
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
    Tinman
  • Tinman
    Tinman Member Posts: 2,808
    edited April 2018
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    Yes, I pressure test them before going to the job. It only takes a few minutes. I'll put a metal "cap" on the bottom of the board and just slide it down the stairs after wheeling it on a flat dolly from my truck. Before I load it on the truck, I'll remove the breakable like the valve heads and thermometers.

    From the board piping to all the branch piping, I'll use ProPress. I just want to use the sweat fittings I already have and using them in the shop makes the most sense to me. I don't want to leave money on the table.

    To hang the board is also a 1 man job. I'll secure a level 2x4 on the wall where the bottom of the board needs to be. My drill will be right next to me and once it's sitting on the 2x4, I'll start attaching the board to the wall. I used the entire 67" I had to work with. You have to be resourceful when you work alone otherwise you waste time and effort.
    Steve Minnich
    Solid_Fuel_Manrick in Alaska
  • FinishGuy
    FinishGuy Member Posts: 31
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    I did commercial office furniture (cubicles and the like) for 4 years as a union carpenter downtown. Best gig ever for learning how to handle and move weight with a minimum of strain. I do not miss watching an 80 footer packed with partitions and surfaces back up to a dock at 5 am. Looking a photos of boiler blocks being shifted suggests you gentlemen know the routine.

    Tough task for me now, working primarily alone, is mounting a run of kitchen cabinet uppers. I can’t afford a genie-lift to pick up a pre-ganged set but I was taught the joys of the French cleat. Prep is more involved but the boxes aren’t going to fall while I tweak the run and drive the screws.

    Once had an old-timer neighbor who kept two lovely Fords running: a Model T and a Model AA stake body. His outstanding piece of wisdom - the lever is our friend!
    1916 two-family, now condo. Top floor. 970 sq. ft. of ‘well ventilated’ space. One-pipe, parallel flow, gas fired steam heat. 27’ of 2” main (un-insulated) vented via Gorton #2. 27’ 1 1/2” dry return (un-insulated) vented by Dole #5. 7 HB Smith Princess 2 col. radiators (38” tall) & 1 ARCo 30s era thin-tube 6 x 8 sec. (32” tall) = total radiator EDR 244. Using Maid-o-Mist radiator vents, sized by calc. & 14 winters tinkering. 1980 HB Smith G210-S-5 rated output 120,000 btu, poor near boiler piping.
  • Mark Eatherton
    Mark Eatherton Member Posts: 5,853
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    Nice job Steve. Keep up the great work. I hear you about being your own "spare" man. Having 4 arms helps. I used to tell my employees, to "work like they owned the company." Only one of them actually got it, and he's now happily self employed. "Never walk from point A to point B without SOMETHING in your hand..."

    ME

    There was an error rendering this rich post.

    TinmanSolid_Fuel_Mandelta TDZoro
  • Erin Holohan Haskell
    Erin Holohan Haskell Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 2,326
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    Wow! Nice work!

    President
    HeatingHelp.com

    Tinman
  • Tinman
    Tinman Member Posts: 2,808
    edited April 2018
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    @Mark Eatherton - I paid for college and then trade school by working as a cook on Amtrak in the late 70’s. Occasionally, I’d get paid to ride out to Seattle, LA, or New York just to work the trip back. We call it deadheading. I told my employees the same thing as you - No deadheading! I think from here on out, I’ll be working solo.
    Steve Minnich
    Mark Eatherton
  • Alan (California Radiant) Forbes
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    Me too, Steve. It's much more satisfying and less stressful. And you don't have to work for GC's which means you get paid when the job is done, not in 6 months.
    I don't mean to bash general contractors; it's just the way things work in that hierarchy.
    8.33 lbs./gal. x 60 min./hr. x 20°ΔT = 10,000 BTU's/hour

    Two btu per sq ft for degree difference for a slab
    ZmanTinman
  • delta T
    delta T Member Posts: 884
    edited August 2018
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    @Mark Eatherton re: never walking anywhere with your hands empty, I swear you could my dad, that is one of his mantras. Also, keep your a** behind your work, and hurry up every chance you get.

    Amazing pre fab @Stephen Minnich
    TinmanDZoro
  • DZoro
    DZoro Member Posts: 1,048
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    PRIDE
    Nice work, glad I also now work alone. Pride is something you just can't teach, when they don't care...
    Just beautiful solder work :)
    D
    Tinman
  • tim smith
    tim smith Member Posts: 2,765
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    Really nice work, glad to see high quality work. Its what we strive for.
    Tinman