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Why are compression fitting so popular in the UK but not the US?

Just an observation that on many videos it appears that the UK uses compression fittings all over the place. Heating, potable. I certainly know that we have them here but I haven't ever seen someone use on on a heating system but the UK seems very into them. Just wondering why or what your thoughts are. I like the idea of them and always have but they always seem like an accident waiting to happen with too many points to fail in each.

Comments

  • Leon82Leon82 Posts: 616Member
    It's always a pain to fix them as the ring always damages the tube and if there isn't enough extra you need another splice.

    And if I recall you need to be licensed in the USA to use the pex compression fittings and there is a whole DIY industry here
  • ratioratio Posts: 2,033Member
    Maybe it's just me, but I'm batting about .100 on successful compression joints on first try. Then I have to solder it anyway. :(

    Might as well solder it right out of the gate.

  • EBEBRATT-EdEBEBRATT-Ed Posts: 5,853Member
    On some systems they are frowned on like fuel oil for instance.

    Always trying to make the best joints possible on any system. You don't usually see regular compression fittings used on oil, refrigerant or gas piping (with some exceptions).

    I have had pretty good luck with them but if it's something that has to be assembled and disassembled they usually don't fare well
  • jumperjumper Posts: 1,339Member

    On some systems they are frowned on like fuel oil for instance.

    Always trying to make the best joints possible on any system. You don't usually see regular compression fittings used on oil, refrigerant or gas piping (with some exceptions).

    I have had pretty good luck with them but if it's something that has to be assembled and disassembled they usually don't fare well

    I agree that hard ring is not so good when fixing. Pipe thread is easiest unless it seizes. Seems that in each locality a particular method gets traction and continues.

    In PlumbingConference I recently complained about a push on connection on a kitchen fixture.

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