Click here to Find a Contractor in your area.
Welcome! Here are the website rules, as well as some tips for using this forum.
Need to contact us? Visit https://heatinghelp.com/contact-us/.

Hot Water Boiler Question

jlocher1
jlocher1 Member Posts: 2
I have a hot water boiler system that is one zone. There are 3 supplies and 3 return pipes. One section of my house that are on the same supply run have always had issues providing heat. My house was built in 1940 with multiple additions added throughout the years. I am renovating a bedroom and replaced the baseboard because a lot of the fins were damaged. During this process I went up in the attic and found 2 valves on the same run that were closed. I assumed these were the supply and return and could be the issue on why the heat wasnt working well back there.

I opened up the return and supply in the floor and immediately heard water flow through the pipes. My issue now is the pressure reducing valve keeps feeding the boiler water and hasn't shut off. It probably ran for over an hour before I had enough and shut off the water going to the boiler all together (the boiler is not on). My main question is, what would cause the pressure reducing valve to continuously feed water (it was replaced last year) besides a leak in my system? It just seems that since the pipes are above my ceiling and I let the water fill for over an hour that I would have notices a leak by now.

Thanks in advance!

Comments

  • Ironman
    Ironman Member Posts: 6,398
    I would definitely say you have a leak!
    Bob Boan
    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.
  • jlocher1
    jlocher1 Member Posts: 2
    a leak was my initial thought, but I looked all over the ceiling directly below the piping and saw nothing. It definitely seems to me that I would hear water or see the evidence of a leak since I let it fill for so long.
  • Ironman
    Ironman Member Posts: 6,398
    edited September 2017
    Think about it: if you were filling it for over an hour, where could the water be going?

    The AVERAGE baseboard hydronic system holds 20 gal. or less, including the boiler. The fill valve is probably supplying at least 4-5 gpm. You do the math.

    Turn off the fill valve and see if the system holds pressure.
    Bob Boan
    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.
    HVACNUT
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 16,321
    That much water is going somewhere. It may take some detective work to find it -- but perhaps there is an odd connection to the drain pipes somewhere? Perhaps a dry well? But even a little valve open will flow a gallon or two per minute... which is on the order of 100 gallons.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • Ironman
    Ironman Member Posts: 6,398
    There may be some drain valves on that loop somewhere that are open. Or a busted underground pipe.
    Bob Boan
    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.