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Any experience with "The Defender" LL6070 low-level CO detector?

D107D107 Member Posts: 1,499
edited July 2017 in Carbon Monoxide Awareness
Just saw this online today and wondered how it compares with the ones by CO Experts and NSI.

Comments

  • Tim McElwainTim McElwain Member Posts: 4,231
    No experience with that particular detector. I did check it out on their website and it compares pretty well with NCI and COExperts detectors.
  • D107D107 Member Posts: 1,499
    I've had the NSI ones for years but they make it so hard to buy--have to go through an NCI plumber who has to install it, etc. No time or money for all that. I know why they do it, but still....
  • NY_RobNY_Rob Member Posts: 1,369
    15ppm CO seems a little low to start audible alerts... some areas (LA, NYC, etc..) would reach/exceed that level easily on many summer days I imagine.

    I'm 60+ miles from NYC and I've seen outdoor CO readings as high as 25ppm outdoors during the summer.
  • captaincocaptainco Member Posts: 424
    When you read medical reports that state CO levels of 3-7ppm outdoors send small kids with asthma to emergency rooms and levels of 5-6 ppm affect unborn babies, 15 ppm may not be low enough. World Health Organization states that 15-20 ppm can cause long term health effects on just about anyone.

    Waiting for alarms to go off after people are injured or have systems is allowing damage to occur is too late!

    25 ppm is the maximum for parking garages according to the International Fuel Gas Code. Don't we deserve better than a parking garage?
  • NY_RobNY_Rob Member Posts: 1,369
    ^ just curious Cap... when you have a area like the Tri-State with roughly 20.2 million people and all the 15ppm CO alarms start sounding because the outdoor CO level is 22ppm for 8hrs what do you tell them to do?
  • captaincocaptainco Member Posts: 424
    Buy good health and life insurance. :) Violation of the Clean Air Act!

    I would install something in my house that destroys CO. PCO!
  • ChrisJChrisJ Member Posts: 9,661
    captainco said:

    When you read medical reports that state CO levels of 3-7ppm outdoors send small kids with asthma to emergency rooms and levels of 5-6 ppm affect unborn babies, 15 ppm may not be low enough. World Health Organization states that 15-20 ppm can cause long term health effects on just about anyone.

    Waiting for alarms to go off after people are injured or have systems is allowing damage to occur is too late!

    25 ppm is the maximum for parking garages according to the International Fuel Gas Code. Don't we deserve better than a parking garage?

    What about all of those that smoke?
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • captaincocaptainco Member Posts: 424
    They buy good health insurance and life insurance.
  • JohnNYJohnNY Member Posts: 2,235
    NY_Rob said:

    15ppm CO seems a little low to start audible alerts... some areas (LA, NYC, etc..) would reach/exceed that level easily on many summer days I imagine.

    I'm 60+ miles from NYC and I've seen outdoor CO readings as high as 25ppm outdoors during the summer.

    Are you standing next to your dryer vent when taking these readings? I constantly stand outside in Manhattan and zero my meter and I've never gotten anything more than one or two ppm with traffic around.
    For installations, troubleshooting, and private consulting services, find John "JohnNY" Cataneo here at :
    "72°F Mechanical, LLC"
    Or email John at [email protected]
    John is a professional Master Plumber, licensed by The Department of Buildings of The City of New York, and works extensively in NYC while consulting for clients in and out of state.
  • captaincocaptainco Member Posts: 424
    Unless you have a Bacharach analyzer all other analyzers will zero out up to 100ppm of CO and pretend it is not there.
  • NY_RobNY_Rob Member Posts: 1,369
    JohnNY said:

    NY_Rob said:

    15ppm CO seems a little low to start audible alerts... some areas (LA, NYC, etc..) would reach/exceed that level easily on many summer days I imagine.

    I'm 60+ miles from NYC and I've seen outdoor CO readings as high as 25ppm outdoors during the summer.

    Are you standing next to your dryer vent when taking these readings? I constantly stand outside in Manhattan and zero my meter and I've never gotten anything more than one or two ppm with traffic around.
    That incident I referred to happened one day last summer, the readings were taken in my backyard and also from three houses away down our residential street.
    Generally I see 0 to 1 PPM CO outdoors summer or winter in mid L.I. .

    I have the Sensorcon Inspector mounted in a central location on the ground floor of my house between the basement and kitchen. It's there just for reference, and normally reads zero to maybe 1ppm (my wife had the gas oven do a self-cleaning the other day, she opened all the windows- it went up to 2ppm) .... that's why I was shocked to see an indoor reading of 22 inside the house that Saturday morning last summer.

    One day last month it read 12ppm inside the house, so I brought it outside and it crept up to 14ppm. Later on that evening it was back down to zero inside and outdoors.
  • captaincocaptainco Member Posts: 424
    Are you aware that the Sensorcon does respond to other gases besides CO? I am not sure exactly which ones or how much, but I do know I need to avoid uncontrolled rear gas emissions while I am using it:) Most CO sensors are cross-sensitive to other gases.

    Actually had a contractor tell me once that the only place his Sensorcon was reading CO was in one cubicle in a large office where someone was sitting. That is one you might want to keep to yourself. I bet they can go crazy on elevators sometimes. I think that is a Law of Motion. If something goes up, something must go down?

    I have customers that have contests to see who can make it read the highest.
  • NY_RobNY_Rob Member Posts: 1,369
    ^ lol, I'll have to give that a try next time the dog breaks wind :o
    He's small, only 48lbs... but he can clear a room!
  • captaincocaptainco Member Posts: 424
    Now the truth comes out!
  • BoonBoon Member Posts: 237
    > @NY_Rob said: Sensorcon Inspector...One day last month it read 12ppm inside the house, so I brought it outside and it crept up to 14ppm. Later on that evening it was back down to zero inside and outdoors.

    I've seen this scenario several times. And surprisingly I see outdoor levels hover below 10 more frequently than I would've ever thought.

    Mine was in my back pocket while driving and I let one go. I seriously thought I broke the sensor. It took about 12 hours before it returned to normal.
    DIY'er ... ripped out a perfectly good forced-air furnace and replaced it with hot water & radiators.
  • captaincocaptainco Member Posts: 424
    Here is an article I wrote about cross interference to CO sensors or monitors three years ago.
    Okay, bodily functions aren't mentioned. They were redacted:(
    doc
    doc
    article - NSI3000 CO Monitor Interference.doc
    30K
  • NY_RobNY_Rob Member Posts: 1,369
    edited September 2017
    Even considering cross interference, etc... it's not hard to imagine a few stagnant summer days when NYC and surrounds suffer from high CO levels for good parts of a day....

  • captaincocaptainco Member Posts: 424
    When EPA measures outdoor CO it is usually at the top of a taller building. CO is lighter than air and tends to rise rather than hover near the ground, especially in the summer. Some of the other interference gases are heavier, not that there won't be measureable CO near the ground for a short period. Whatever gas most detectors are measuring, most aren't good for us, with the exception of laughing gas (NO).
  • Sal SantamauraSal Santamaura Member Posts: 279
    I recently ordered a new CO Experts detector to replace the one currently in our home, which is set to expire at the end of this month. After being told it was back ordered, but should show up soon, I cruised over to CO Experts' own Web site:



    Sadly, George Kerr died, so it seems "The Defender LL6070" may be non-contractors' only low-level CO detector option left. I'm waiting to hear back from the retailer about my CO Experts order, but will probably end up buying a Defender from Tru Tech Tools



    soon.
  • Tim McElwainTim McElwain Member Posts: 4,231
    I was not aware that George had passed away. I sent an e-mail to his family sending my condolences and including my hope that his fine detector will continue to be produced.
  • Sal SantamauraSal Santamaura Member Posts: 279
    edited November 2017

    I was not aware that George had passed away. I sent an e-mail to his family sending my condolences and including my hope that his fine detector will continue to be produced.

    Over the last three hours, I've been in contact with my retail source for the CO Experts monitor and received this reply:

    "With the passing of George Kerr and while the estate resolves its issues with regard to the disposition of the assets of George's business, Seabreeze International Corp is our point of contact for all questions and orders related to CO Experts monitors. Seabreeze has received all of the products CO Experts LLC had on site. I've been in weekly contact with them.

    Seabreeze has been the developer and manufacturer of the CO Experts monitors for about 8 years. They are in the position to ensure that all of our customer's needs continue to be met moving forward."


    So, sad news about George, but good news about CO Experts monitors. My replacement is expected to ship Thursday.


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