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Propane stove burner flame turned orange today - why?

It was normal blue this morning. Now it's orange. What's that mean? Nothing has changed. Doesn't smell either. Moisture / humidity in air too high?

I've been googling reasons. Most talk of dirt or rust. No idea how dirt or rust can suddenly appear. Not an outdoor situation.
Tank was filled last month. It's mostly full still. Been using propane everyday between oven, stove and clothes dryer. Nothing has changed. Except maybe outdoor temps are yo-yo-ing lately & higher humidity. Every burner the same color.

Ideas?

Comments

  • ratioratio Posts: 1,664Member
    Dust in the air? How long has it been orange now? It's burning improperly, but I don't know if it's "turn it off NOW" improper or "we'll be out tomorrow" improper.
  • JUGHNEJUGHNE Posts: 4,928Member
    Time and gas both pass quickly, are you sure the tank has plenty of gas? Heard of this when the tank is almost out, which would be low pressure.....also caused by bad regulator/s.
  • Patchogue Phil_2Patchogue Phil_2 Posts: 285Member
    I personally checked the tank, it's mostly full.
  • ChrisJChrisJ Posts: 9,182Member
    Well,
    I don't know why it's orange, but at least it's not green. That'd be bad. Real bad.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • Patchogue Phil_2Patchogue Phil_2 Posts: 285Member
    If you are serious, what would a green flame mean?
  • ratioratio Posts: 1,664Member
    Burning copper. The opposite of good for you.
  • ChrisJChrisJ Posts: 9,182Member
    edited March 2017

    If you are serious, what would a green flame mean?

    I believe a Freon (R12, R22 etc) leak causes green flames and it produces phosgene gas. Perhaps other refrigerants do as well, I don't know.

    Either way, don't burn refrigerants.

    So if you had an A/C leak in the building, it could cause green flames and it'd be really bad.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • Patchogue Phil_2Patchogue Phil_2 Posts: 285Member
    Nope, no Freon let loose in the house. Doubtful there's any burning cu either.

    Maybe a spider blocking air inlet but it's all the stove burners.
  • EBEBRATT-EdEBEBRATT-Ed Posts: 4,491Member
    Has someone been sweeping, vacuuming or cleaning? Dust in the air can do this
  • ZmanZman Posts: 4,402Member
    Mine will do that if the burner cover gets bumped or if the debris get trapped under it.
    Give it a good cleaning and see what happens
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
  • lchmblchmb Posts: 2,845Member
    usually with propane we get the complaint of an orange flame after a fill up. If the driver moves the pigtail at the tank or the line supplying the house it will do this. If someone moved the line inside the house, it will do this also...generally not an issue. If however you have any propane odors please call your supplier as this could indicate a leak...even a small one should be fixed asap...
  • Patchogue Phil_2Patchogue Phil_2 Posts: 285Member
    Nope no propane smells. No sweeping dusting etc. All covers on all 5 burners okay.

    This evening, all burner flames are 90% back to normal blue.

    I'm stumped.
  • Patchogue Phil_2Patchogue Phil_2 Posts: 285Member
    > @lchmb said:
    > usually with propane we get the complaint of an orange flame after a fill up. If the driver moves the pigtail at the tank or the line supplying the house it will do this. If someone moved the line inside the house, it will do this also...generally not an issue. If however you have any propane odors please call your supplier as this could indicate a leak...even a small one should be fixed asap...

    Is this because of some particulate matter inside the lines gets to the burners? I wondered if it was moisture here, somehow got from the tank to the burners.
  • LeonardLeonard Posts: 482Member
    edited March 2017
    Had that happen while visiting a friends house, but I think his flame was yellowish instead of the normal blue. Fumes were burning my eyes too. Hunted it down to low propane pressure.

    It was spring and water dripping off roof was splashing onto propane reg's vent under tank cover and freezing it over. I wanted to use a hairdrier to melt it, but my friend was a fire chief and nervous about sparking a propane fire, even though there was no propane leak. So for safety we ended up using a window box fan to blow away any possible propane accumulation and he let me melt the ice with a hair drier. We kept hair drier intake upstream of air flow past reg so it could not inhale propane in case it sparked. As soon as ice melted and vent was free then flame was normal again.

    I folded up some aluminum foil and made a tent over the reg vent so water wouldn't splash on it and ice up again. Worked perfect.
  • Tim McElwainTim McElwain Posts: 4,129Member
    Orange flames are usually an indication that rust or dust has been stirred up. The dust from the area of the air shutters on the burners, rust from with the piping system.

    Sometimes propane will do this right after the tank got low and then it was filled. The filling loosens up rust that might be inside the tank. It can also be a case of moisture that was in the recent fill could cause that to happen. Have the LP company put some methanol in the tank that will usually take care of it.

    The end of all this orange does not cause an unsafe condition that would be if the flame was yellow. Usually the orange will go away after a short time.
  • Patchogue Phil_2Patchogue Phil_2 Posts: 285Member
    > @Tim McElwain said:
    >
    >
    > The end of all this orange does not cause an unsafe condition that would be if the flame was yellow. Usually the orange will go away after a short time.

    Good to hear this. Thanks for the info.
  • lchmblchmb Posts: 2,845Member
    What Tim said....man has a ton of knowledge..;)
  • Patchogue Phil_2Patchogue Phil_2 Posts: 285Member
    Flame is back to being all blue, textbook perfect color.
  • flat_twinflat_twin Posts: 167Member
    I saw this happen with an antique white gas radiant heater in my garage after I swept the floor. Blue flames became yellow until the dust settled down.
  • Patchogue Phil_2Patchogue Phil_2 Posts: 285Member
    In my case it wasn't dust in the air. Likely moisture in the propane.
  • Marilyn1951Marilyn1951 Posts: 1Member
    I just moved into a mobile home that uses propane, so I'm very new at all this..I have been seeing alot of orange flame.. The propane tank is used by a whole row of mobile homes... Should I be worried.... All burners are orange with just a little blue at the bottom..
  • JUGHNEJUGHNE Posts: 4,928Member
    Do the neighbors have the same orange flames?
  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Posts: 8,895Member

    I just moved into a mobile home that uses propane, so I'm very new at all this..I have been seeing alot of orange flame.. The propane tank is used by a whole row of mobile homes... Should I be worried.... All burners are orange with just a little blue at the bottom..

    Two quick questions. First, do you have a CO detector along with your fire alarm? If not, get one and install it.

    Second, is the flame orange or yellow? That's not trivial. Orange usually is contamination of some kind -- it's sodium or calcium ions, to be technical. Yellow, however, may indicate poor combustion, which you want to get checked out.
    Jamie



    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.



    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • Solid_Fuel_ManSolid_Fuel_Man Posts: 1,190Member
    Try opening windows and allow fresh air to the burners and see if the color changes. As @Jamie Hall said the orange can be caused by calcium or sodium ions from a humidifier or local water supply etc.
    Master electrician specialising in boiler and burner controls, multiple fuel systems, radiant system controls, building controls, and universal refrigeration tech.
  • psb75psb75 Posts: 59Member
    From Vermont: during a long deep cold spell in Dec. Jan. this winter I experienced several new gas mod/con boilers throwing a fault code, "ignition not happening". Turned out the "regulators were frozen." Recently I had someone explain that during this cold spell the LP supplies were so low at the main depots that they were drawing up water from bottom of the big tanks. Local suppliers were then delivering some water along with LP to their home accounts. THAT water would then freeze up the home regulators.
  • lproulxlproulx Posts: 1Member
    Had this happen with natural gas and an ultrasonic humidifier in the house. Shut off humidifier and flames cleared up in an hour. Don't know why - maybe same reason flames burn orange when you spill water on the stove.
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