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Installing a vent free 30,000BTU propane wall heater. Supply line through exterior wall underneath.

Hello, I'm installing a wall mounted vent free 30,000BTU propane heater. I need to install the supply line directly through the exterior wall underneath the heater to the outside. The propane company said they usually just hook up to a 3/4" black pipe on the exterior. Can I simply just put a solid piece of Threaded 3/4" black pipe through the wall and use a flexible pipe from there to the wall heater? They bring the line to the outside connection, provide the 2 stage regulator, and do a leak test. I have nothing else I'm using gas for and I want to keep this as simple as possible.

Comments

  • Tim McElwainTim McElwain Posts: 4,281Member
    Normally yes, however check with your local mechanical inspector to make sure. Make sure you check the connections after with a soap and water solution to make sure there are no leaks.
  • IronmanIronman Posts: 5,228Member
    It depends on what you mean by "flexible pipe". If you're referring to a pre-assembled, listed flexible connector which comes in lengths up to 6', then the answer is clearly no. They not allowed to penetrate a floor or wall.

    If you mean CSST tubing, then maybe. But the only time that can penetrate a floor is when it's in a wall and protected with strike plates; in cannot go through a floor exposed.

    Every manufacturer of CSST requires training and certification on THEIR particular brand and almost all jurisdictions require a gas fitters license. CSST must also be properly bonded to the electrical grounding system and most jurisdictions require an electrical license for that.

    I may be easier to pay the gas company a little extra to do it.
    Bob Boan


    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.
  • Tim McElwainTim McElwain Posts: 4,281Member
    Bob, in his posting he said he was running black pipe through the wall. So a flex connector would suffice, or even a short piece of CSST the type that does not need bonding could be used.

    I wonder what this heater is being used for?
  • IronmanIronman Posts: 5,228Member

    Bob, in his posting he said he was running black pipe through the wall. So a flex connector would suffice, or even a short piece of CSST the type that does not need bonding could be used.

    I wonder what this heater is being used for?

    Tim, I may have misunderstood his wording, but I thought he meant going through the floor, then out through the wall.

    Obviously, just going through the wall he could use a piece of black iron and a flex connector with a gas cock.

    Bob Boan


    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.
  • Solid_Fuel_ManSolid_Fuel_Man Posts: 1,707Member
    I would run soft copper for propane, flared ends of course. I avoid CCST at all costs.

    Taylor
    Serving Northern Maine HVAC, and Controls
  • delta Tdelta T Posts: 785Member

    I would run soft copper for propane, flared ends of course. I avoid CCST at all costs.



    Taylor

    Check with your local AHJ before you run Cu, mine does not allow Cu unless it is buried, and then grudgingly. Not really sure why, I like Cu, but then again I do know how to do flared joints. Something a lot of people around here don't know anymore.......They are even trying to get away from flare fittings on buried water lines. Everything is switching to the burial rated compression fittings for water lines.

    Sigh.......

    @Tim McElwain My AHJ does not allow ANY type of CSST to not be bonded, regardless of what the manufacturer says.

    Bottom line, the safest bet is a piece a steel through the wall, shutoff, then drip leg, then flex connector to the appliance IMHO.
  • Solid_Fuel_ManSolid_Fuel_Man Posts: 1,707Member
    Wow, I had no idea coppor was not allowed in some jurisdictions. All the places I've worked at least in Maine soft copper is no problem. The gas company runs miles of the stuff for propane.

    Taylor
    Serving Northern Maine HVAC, and Controls
  • keyotekeyote Posts: 659Member
    you might want to make sure you black iron stub out has a drip leg and is secured in a way no ones going to have an issue about that. and some juridictions might want it sleeved
  • john p_2john p_2 Posts: 328Member
    I would use galvanized thru the wall to the exterior. Do not believe any of the posters that will talk about flaking from galvanized pipe...This was an issue with American made years and years ago that has been corrected with much improved quality of pipe and also the natural gas is more pure.

    Now a days it is the Chinese galvanized pipe that we see flaking, occasionally. If you use American made galvanized pipe & fittings you'll be fine.

    Most utility companies don't require dirt legs any longer citing cleaner/purer product but I still like to see these used before an appliance.

    Naturally, support all piping properly and make sure the flex connector is rated for the appliance you'd be connecting to.
  • MarlysMarlys Posts: 1Member
    Running line from tank to heater
  • SteamheadSteamhead Posts: 13,284Member
    @Marlys , you might want to start a new discussion- this one's three years old.
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    "Reducing our country's energy consumption, one system at a time"
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Baltimore, MD (USA) and consulting anywhere.
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/all-steamed-up-inc
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