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Raising Steam main

Paul SPaul S Posts: 1,257Member
i have this residential oil to gas conversion on a standard one pipe system coming up. It was just a simple boiler replacement, but now customer wants to finish basement, problem is theres a 2.5" steam main running across the basement and i would like them to keep the steam. i have room to run the main between the floor joists in the basement ceiling but now all the risers to each radiator will be below the main when i raise it. I would like to come off the main to each riser and drip each riser into a wet return (the drip connection will be 28in above water line, maybe even more). Seems like it will work no problem....Any advice would be appreciated if any of you have done this. Again i would like to keep the steam. Thanks Paul S
ASM Mechanical Company
Located in Staten Island NY
Servicing all 5 boroughs of NYC.
347-692-4777
[email protected]
ASMHVACNYC.COM
https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/asm-mechanical-company

Comments

  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Posts: 8,535Member
    Do I presume that the risers have to go horizontally varying distances under the floor joists? Any that don't -- that go up in the same joist bay as the raised steam main -- you will be much much better off to keep them coming off at the top or no more than 45 degrees off vertical from the main, and shorten the actual vertical pipe to suit.

    If there is a horizontal runout, however, that won't work, of course. So your idea should work, provided you take real precautions against condensate going down the "drip" from getting into the runout. To which end, I would suggest that the upper portion of the drip -- to at least several inches below the connection to the runout -- be 2 inch (assuming the runout is smaller than that). You can probably reduce it below that point. Also, if possible I would increase the pitch back to the drip to help any condensate which does make it around the corner into the runout to drop back out.
    Jamie



    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.



    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • Paul SPaul S Posts: 1,257Member
    the risers do have to run horizontally across the floor joists....
    ASM Mechanical Company
    Located in Staten Island NY
    Servicing all 5 boroughs of NYC.
    347-692-4777
    [email protected]
    ASMHVACNYC.COM
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/asm-mechanical-company
  • SteamheadSteamhead Posts: 12,296Member
    That should work fine. Pitch the runouts 1 inch in 20 feet away from the main. Make sure the drips on the risers drop below the waterline before connecting to each other or the wet return, and you shouldn't have any trouble.
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    "Reducing our country's energy consumption, one system at a time"
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Baltimore, MD (USA) and consulting anywhere.
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/all-steamed-up-inc
  • Paul SPaul S Posts: 1,257Member
    thanks
    ASM Mechanical Company
    Located in Staten Island NY
    Servicing all 5 boroughs of NYC.
    347-692-4777
    [email protected]
    ASMHVACNYC.COM
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/asm-mechanical-company
  • Dave0176Dave0176 Posts: 826Member
    Sounds like a lot of work lol.
    DL Mechanical LLC Heating & Cooling 732-266-5386
    Specializing in Steam Heating, Serving most of NJ
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/dl-mechanical-llc

    https://m.facebook.com/DL-Mechanical-LLC-315309995326627/?ref=content_filter




    I cannot force people to spend money, I can only suggest how to spend it wisely.......
  • SteamheadSteamhead Posts: 12,296Member
    For steam, it's worth it.
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    "Reducing our country's energy consumption, one system at a time"
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Baltimore, MD (USA) and consulting anywhere.
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/all-steamed-up-inc
  • ChrisJChrisJ Posts: 9,051Member
    Dave0176 said:

    Sounds like a lot of work lol.

    Since when have you been afraid of work?
    ;)
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • Paul SPaul S Posts: 1,257Member
    edited October 2016
    i will be starting this job soon....i have about ONLY 75 Ft of Cast iron Burnham 9 inch baseboard throughout the home....i believe without checking Dan's EDR book its about 3.4SQ Ft of EDR per foot? i will verify tomorrow when i get to my truck.....customer states that system worked fine for years.....all baseboard is properly pitched.....all horizontal run outs to risers are 1 inch.....at that point i will put a 2 in tee at each run out (bull of tee would feed the runout ) bottom of tee (run) would drip (2 in) a few inches then reduce down to 1.25" to a 1.25" existing wet return...im using @jaime hall recommendation oversizing the drip connections between the supply drop to horizontal run out and drip to wet return.....would you guys run a standard 2 in main that i believe can handle around 900 or so EDR ? (when steam and condensate are going in same direction)? or run a larger main lets say 2.5 in to slow down steam velocity?....i will be using a Williamson GSA-100 (258 sq ft of EDR)....with a full 3 inch dropheader.....vaporstat etc....also i will vent the mains very quick probably 1 "big mouth".....but with the small CI baseboard should i use the slowest steam rad vent possible? ive had problems with CI baseboard in the past with steam.(on existing badly piped systems)...any recommendations and advice would be appreciated.....im saving a steam system here....there other quotes were scorched air and series loop baseboard hot water system.....both systems were well over 150K btus.....thanks in advance Paul S
    ASM Mechanical Company
    Located in Staten Island NY
    Servicing all 5 boroughs of NYC.
    347-692-4777
    [email protected]
    ASMHVACNYC.COM
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/asm-mechanical-company
  • Paul SPaul S Posts: 1,257Member
    any recommendations?
    ASM Mechanical Company
    Located in Staten Island NY
    Servicing all 5 boroughs of NYC.
    347-692-4777
    [email protected]
    ASMHVACNYC.COM
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/asm-mechanical-company
  • Danny ScullyDanny Scully Posts: 985Member
    edited October 2016
    Take pictures :lol: . To answer your question, 2" is suitable. I'm doing a conterflow job soon and only a portion of it will be 3", then 2.5, then 2, etc.
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