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Square feet of steam question....

BrianT1077
BrianT1077 Member Posts: 108
Hello, I just recently had an oil to gas conversion done and I saw that our old oil steam boiler put out 358 square feet of steam, with 114,000 btu input and 86,000 btu output. The new gas steam boiler only puts out 267 square feet of steam and is rated for 103,000 btu input and 85,000 btu output. Is there going to be a problem with the square feet of steam difference? My home is approx. 1650 square feet and I have 11 Radiators in the house, 8 larger ones and 3 smaller ones. Thank you for your help!
Crown Boiler Bermuda Series model: BSI103, BTU output: 85,000, single pipe steam system
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Comments

  • KC_Jones
    KC_Jones Member Posts: 5,081
    The square feet relates to the EDR of all the radiators in your house. No one can really answer your question without that information. You would need to calculate the EDR or the rads and compare that number to the number on the boiler and see where you are. Did the contractor go around your house and measure all the rads? There are several sizing charts online (I attached a link to one start at bottom of page 9). You find the style of radiator you have and then measure, then look it up on the chart which gives a number per section. Multiply that number by number of sections and you have the EDR of that rad. Add up all the rads in the house and you have your number. If you have difficulty identifying your rads post some pictures here and people can help.
    http://www.weil-mclain.com/en/multimedia-library/pdf/weil-mclain-pdf/other-downloads/boiler_replacement_guide.pdf
    2014 Weil Mclain EG-40
    EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Boiler Control
    Boiler pictures updated 2/21/15
    BrianT1077
  • BrianT1077
    BrianT1077 Member Posts: 108
    OK, I will post that info tonight. Thank you!
    Crown Boiler Bermuda Series model: BSI103, BTU output: 85,000, single pipe steam system
  • BrianT1077
    BrianT1077 Member Posts: 108
    I found both responses very interesting and hopefully getting me to the point of understanding everything. The new unit that was installed is a Crown Boiler Natural Gas Steam Boiler Model: Bermuda Series BSI 103. The old unit was a 1999 Weil-McLain Gold Oil Boiler Model: P-SGO-3. I did however take measurements of all my radiators (Traditional Tube Type Radiators).

    They are as follows:

    Kitchen: 23"H x 8"W, 5 Tube, 9 Column
    Back Hallway: 23"H x 8"W, 5 Tube, 5 Column
    1st Flr Bathroom: 19"H x 6.5"W, 4 Tube, 4 Column
    Dining Room: 23"H x 8"W, 5 Tube, 12 Column
    Living Room 1st: 23"H x 8"W, 5 Tube, 13 Column
    Living Room 2nd: 23"H x 8"W, 5 Tube, 11 Column
    Front Room: 23"H x 8"W, 5 Tube, 16 Column
    2nd Flr Bathroom: 23"H x 5"W, 3 Tube, 8 Column
    Master BR: 23"H x 8"W, 5 Tube, 13 Column
    Girl's BR: 23"H x 8"W, 5 Tube, 13 Column
    Boy's BR: 23"H x 8"W, 5 Tube, 8 Column

    Any more input on this matter is greatly appreciated, thank you!
    Also I think I can get you whatever information you might need.
    Crown Boiler Bermuda Series model: BSI103, BTU output: 85,000, single pipe steam system
  • kcopp
    kcopp Member Posts: 3,990
    My calculations show an EDR of 299.
    The boiler may be a bit small but you still may be ok since the house most likely has had some weatherization done on it since the system was originally installed.
    BrianT1077
  • Fred
    Fred Member Posts: 8,518
    If your measurements are right and these are all tube type and by columns you mean sections, I come up with a total EDR for all radiators of 324. If your new boiler is only 267 EDR rating, with the 33% pick-up/piping factor added on the boiler has a total of 356 EDR. That only leaves you with about a 10% pick-up and piping factor. I'd be comfortable with anything between 20% and the standard 33%. You might get by if the near boiler piping was done correctly and all the pipes, near boiler, mains risers, etc are well insulated and the main venting is really good, but personally, I'd be a little concerned until we have a cold spell and you can see how it performs. Others may say you'll be OK but every install is different and 10% pick-up/piping is just concerning for me.
    BrianT1077
  • KC_Jones
    KC_Jones Member Posts: 5,081
    I am getting a similar calculation. I must admit my curiosity is peaked. We aren't used to hearing of installers sizing on the small side like this. Usually they are grossly oversized. Sounds like you might have an installer that might actually know what they are doing! I know what everyone is thinking so I will ask, would you mind posting pictures of the boiler and piping so we may see the install you got (it's boiler porn to us).
    2014 Weil Mclain EG-40
    EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Boiler Control
    Boiler pictures updated 2/21/15
    BrianT1077
  • BrianT1077
    BrianT1077 Member Posts: 108
    I will post some pictures of the boiler and some radiators for everyone. Yes the plumber is very good in my opinion, he has fixed a few other things for me and my family and everything comes out good. Some more info, I am in North NJ, my house is a Tudor Style Home built in 1930 or before. Here are some pics:
    Crown Boiler Bermuda Series model: BSI103, BTU output: 85,000, single pipe steam system
  • Fred
    Fred Member Posts: 8,518
    Now I am a bit more concerned. That copper up to the Mains should not be copper. It should be black iron. The header looks a little small. It should be one size larger that the riser, out of the boiler and unless the picture is misleading, the header looks like it is pitched back towards the riser and it should have a slight pitch towards the equalizer (pipe that goes down to the bottom of the boiler).
    Radiators are as you described so our measurements should be fairly accurate.
    BrianT1077
  • BrianT1077
    BrianT1077 Member Posts: 108
    edited October 2015
    If anyone needs more pictures, let me know and I will take them. I have to say this discussion is getting interesting from all the input from everyone. Thank you!
    Crown Boiler Bermuda Series model: BSI103, BTU output: 85,000, single pipe steam system
  • Fred
    Fred Member Posts: 8,518

    If anyone needs more pictures, let me know and I will take them.

    Where is the water supply into the boiler? Did he install a skim Port? Is it on the other side of the boiler?
    BrianT1077
  • BrianT1077
    BrianT1077 Member Posts: 108
    Here is a pic of the water supply, I do not see a skim port on either side, unless I am missing it.
    Crown Boiler Bermuda Series model: BSI103, BTU output: 85,000, single pipe steam system
  • Paul48
    Paul48 Member Posts: 4,469
    The copper is just wrong. He either bought their piping kit, or followed their parts list. It is minimum, by their own manual. The steam pros here always opt to use the second boiler riser and do a drop-header into an over-sized header. The header must pitch slightly towards the equalizer. At the least, he should fix the pitch issue, and get rid of the copper, before you have leak issues. Any copper below the water line of the boiler is fine.
    BrianT1077
  • Fred
    Fred Member Posts: 8,518
    edited October 2015

    Here is a pic of the water supply, I do not see a skim port on either side, unless I am missing it.

    That's the skim port on the side with the water feed. Black pipe with the cap on it. That's good. You may want to put a ball valve on it for convience (with a plug or cap on the end of the ball valve so no one can open the valve and get scalded) but at least it's there. Copper below the water line for the wet returns is fine but that copper going up to the mains needs to go. Those sweat joints will start to leak in no time due to expansion and contraction and check the pitch on that header. If it were me, I'd also have him increase the size of that header. He may be a good plumber but it doesn't look like he know a lot about steam systems. That really concerns me about the size of the boiler as well. When all is done, be sure to insulate all the piping.
    BrianT1077
  • BrianT1077
    BrianT1077 Member Posts: 108
    Sorry I lost that picture in the comment, here it is again.
    Crown Boiler Bermuda Series model: BSI103, BTU output: 85,000, single pipe steam system
  • BobC
    BobC Member Posts: 5,306
    As long as you insulate the piping the size of the boiler will probably be fine because of the 33% pickup factor. You will have a little less than 20% but that should be fine and can lead to fuel savings as well.

    You should address the piping issues so the system works well and has a nice long life.

    Bob
    Smith G8-3 with EZ Gas @ 90,000 BTU, Single pipe steam
    Vaporstat with a 12oz cut-out and 4oz cut-in
    3PSI gauge
    BrianT1077
  • Fred
    Fred Member Posts: 8,518
    BobC said:

    As long as you insulate the piping the size of the boiler will probably be fine because of the 33% pickup factor. You will have a little less than 20% but that should be fine and can lead to fuel savings as well.

    You should address the piping issues so the system works well and has a nice long life.

    Bob

    Based on radiation EDR totaling about 324 sq. ft., at least by my chart, it appears to me he will only have about 10% remaining for pick-up. I'm not comfortable that that will suffice??? Only time and cold weather will tell. Unfortunately he needs to get all of his issues resolved now (if this is a reputable contractor who will stand behind his work). The size of the boiler is certainly the big question here. Everything else can be corrected.
    BrianT1077
  • BrianT1077
    BrianT1077 Member Posts: 108
    Thank you everyone, I really appreciate everyone's thoughts on this matter. I even have emailed the manufacturer to see what they say.
    Crown Boiler Bermuda Series model: BSI103, BTU output: 85,000, single pipe steam system
  • BobC
    BobC Member Posts: 5,306
    @Fred you are right, I must have fat fingered that calculation.

    That is a slim pickup factor but if everything else (VENTING, piping layout, pipe insulation, etc) is correct he should be ok. Some here have systems running with zero pickup. If the heating needs are smaller (added insulation, etc) than the installed EDR the system should work.

    How long did the old boiler run to satisfy the thermostat on really cold days?

    Bob
    Smith G8-3 with EZ Gas @ 90,000 BTU, Single pipe steam
    Vaporstat with a 12oz cut-out and 4oz cut-in
    3PSI gauge
    BrianT1077
  • jonny88
    jonny88 Member Posts: 1,139
    Seems like we are stuck on basic principles of sizing and thanks to Hat,ChrisJ who are willing to push the envelope we should all step back and review sizing methods.Especially as I see a lot of threads about ripping out steam for no good reason.Its a learning game and every day is a school day.Listen and read to your peers is my advice.
    BrianT1077ChrisJ
  • BrianT1077
    BrianT1077 Member Posts: 108
    edited October 2015
    @ Bob, on really cold days such as 1 week in Feb 2015 when my kids had winter vacation from school, the Weil McLain unit would run for 16-17 minutes then kick off for about 10-11 minutes. This was with the thermostat set at 68F. I had a 275 Gallon AST in the basement and that month I went through 3/4 of the tank in 3 weeks. The unit was working hard and would sometimes kick off due to the low water safety, but then resume a few minutes later when the water level went up from the water returning to the boiler from the radiators.
    Crown Boiler Bermuda Series model: BSI103, BTU output: 85,000, single pipe steam system
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 12,833
    jonny88 said:

    Seems like we are stuck on basic principles of sizing and thanks to Hat,ChrisJ who are willing to push the envelope we should all step back and review sizing methods.Especially as I see a lot of threads about ripping out steam for no good reason.Its a learning game and every day is a school day.Listen and read to your peers is my advice.

    Yes, all credit for that goes to Dave Bunnell. He's been saying it for many years.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 12,833
    After it kicks off due to the low water safety, does the water level come back up to normal after a few minutes?

    What does the water in the gauge glass look like? Is there nasty black or brown sludge in it? Chunks floating up top?
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • BrianT1077
    BrianT1077 Member Posts: 108
    @ Hatterasguy, that is true. I tell my wife that all the time when she is cold and cranks the thermostat thinking it will get warmer in the house quicker, I say, "The boiler fires at the same temperature no matter what degree the thermostat is on so please leave it where it was set." And of course you know she still puts it up a few degrees. LOL!
    Crown Boiler Bermuda Series model: BSI103, BTU output: 85,000, single pipe steam system
  • BrianT1077
    BrianT1077 Member Posts: 108
    @ ChrisJ, Yes it did come back up to normal, I did a few times have to add a little water, not much. The water in the glass would be clear but the sides of the glass would get brown with a film. Never saw any chunks.
    Crown Boiler Bermuda Series model: BSI103, BTU output: 85,000, single pipe steam system
  • BrianT1077
    BrianT1077 Member Posts: 108
    An update: A representative from Crown Boiler answered my email. I gave them all the information I have supplied in this discussion and they have said that the boiler is a little under sized for the heating load.
    Crown Boiler Bermuda Series model: BSI103, BTU output: 85,000, single pipe steam system
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 12,833
    Visionpro 8000 series has a password, the wife can't change it. :)


    Your LWCO is a CycleGuard, that's your first issue.
    It shuts the boiler off to "test for foaming".

    Personally I hate them and would replace it with a Hydrolevel 400. Same brand and should be compatible with the probe that's installed in the block.

    I see your water has water treatment, do you know what kind?
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
    BrianT1077
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 12,833

    An update: A representative from Crown Boiler answered my email. I gave them all the information I have supplied in this discussion and they have said that the boiler is a little under sized for the heating load.

    I purposely undersized my boiler, by a lot.
    I wouldn't worry about that right now. Let's fix the LWCO issue and any other complaints you have.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • BrianT1077
    BrianT1077 Member Posts: 108
    @ChrisJ, the boiler pictured here in this discussion with the CycleGuard is the new one installed a few weeks ago, haven't really used it for heat yet. When I was talking about the LWCO issue, that was with the WM oil unit last Feb. The plumber did put some type of treatment in the new unit but I am unaware of what it is, has that anti-freeze look to it.
    Crown Boiler Bermuda Series model: BSI103, BTU output: 85,000, single pipe steam system
  • BrianT1077
    BrianT1077 Member Posts: 108
    @ChrisJ, I found a picture I had of the unit after it was installed but still needing finishing, on top there was a bottle of treatment called Steam Clean. Maybe that is what is in it?
    Crown Boiler Bermuda Series model: BSI103, BTU output: 85,000, single pipe steam system
  • Fred
    Fred Member Posts: 8,518
    It's one thing to design a steam system to run at little or no Pick-up factor, because other elements of the environment allow that to work BUT it's another thing to have some plumber pick a boiler, on some unknown criteria and then install it wrong on top of that, which proves he doesn't know Steam. As I've said before, I don't care what pick-up factor anyone uses, from 0% to 33% as long as it was an intentional decision on the homeowner's part, based on their own personal knowledge or the discussions that occur on this site or elsewhere. I just don't want a Poster to get advise from here that is proven wrong during a sub-zero spell of weather. I agree, those spells are a small percentage of the total winter season but that's when the heat is needed most. There are trade-offs in every decision. I understand everyone's position on sizing and pick-up/piping factors. Once a position is understood by a poster, let them decide what they feel most comfortable doing. In this case, this is a new install. I hope it works and works well (assumming some corrections are made to the install) but if I hadn't paid, in full for the install yet, I'd want some assurance that that boiler, sized as it is, will work in virtually every winter situation, in my area. One can do that by an intelligent design or one can assume some plumber made a fortunate mistake that will work. I prefer the designed system but that's just my concern with the steam skills available in my area.
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 12,833
    Fred said:

    It's one thing to design a steam system to run at little or no Pick-up factor, because other elements of the environment allow that to work BUT it's another thing to have some plumber pick a boiler, on some unknown criteria and then install it wrong on top of that, which proves he doesn't know Steam. As I've said before, I don't care what pick-up factor anyone uses, from 0% to 33% as long as it was an intentional decision on the homeowner's part, based on their own personal knowledge or the discussions that occur on this site or elsewhere. I just don't want a Poster to get advise from here that is proven wrong during a sub-zero spell of weather. I agree, those spells are a small percentage of the total winter season but that's when the heat is needed most. There are trade-offs in every decision. I understand everyone's position on sizing and pick-up/piping factors. Once a position is understood by a poster, let them decide what they feel most comfortable doing. In this case, this is a new install. I hope it works and works well (assumming some corrections are made to the install) but if I hadn't paid, in full for the install yet, I'd want some assurance that that boiler, sized as it is, will work in virtually every winter situation, in my area. One can do that by an intelligent design or one can assume some plumber made a fortunate mistake that will work. I prefer the designed system but that's just my concern with the steam skills available in my area.

    Did you read what he typed for the two output ratings old vs new?

    What's your concern?
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • KC_Jones
    KC_Jones Member Posts: 5,081
    Also Fred with essentially the same output he has now, the old boiler only ran 62% of the time on the coldest day last winter. If that is truly the case he should still have some cushion in there. Honestly with the information on the past boiler I would have zero concern about the size of the boiler even with the piping as it is. We don't even know what the old piping looked like it could have been the same or worse?!
    2014 Weil Mclain EG-40
    EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Boiler Control
    Boiler pictures updated 2/21/15
  • Fred
    Fred Member Posts: 8,518
    ChrisJ said:

    Fred said:

    It's one thing to design a steam system to run at little or no Pick-up factor, because other elements of the environment allow that to work BUT it's another thing to have some plumber pick a boiler, on some unknown criteria and then install it wrong on top of that, which proves he doesn't know Steam. As I've said before, I don't care what pick-up factor anyone uses, from 0% to 33% as long as it was an intentional decision on the homeowner's part, based on their own personal knowledge or the discussions that occur on this site or elsewhere. I just don't want a Poster to get advise from here that is proven wrong during a sub-zero spell of weather. I agree, those spells are a small percentage of the total winter season but that's when the heat is needed most. There are trade-offs in every decision. I understand everyone's position on sizing and pick-up/piping factors. Once a position is understood by a poster, let them decide what they feel most comfortable doing. In this case, this is a new install. I hope it works and works well (assumming some corrections are made to the install) but if I hadn't paid, in full for the install yet, I'd want some assurance that that boiler, sized as it is, will work in virtually every winter situation, in my area. One can do that by an intelligent design or one can assume some plumber made a fortunate mistake that will work. I prefer the designed system but that's just my concern with the steam skills available in my area.

    Did you read what he typed for the two output ratings old vs new?

    What's your concern?

    "@ Bob, on really cold days such as 1 week in Feb 2015 when my kids had winter vacation from school, the Weil McLain unit would run for 16-17 minutes then kick off for about 10-11 minutes. This was with the thermostat set at 68F. I had a 275 Gallon AST in the basement and that month I went through 3/4 of the tank in 3 weeks. The unit was working hard and would sometimes kick off due to the low water safety, but then resume a few minutes later when the water level went up from the water returning to the boiler from the radiators. "

    The unknowns about both the old boiler and this new one, I guess but time will tell.
  • Fred
    Fred Member Posts: 8,518
    KC_Jones said:

    Also Fred with essentially the same output he has now, the old boiler only ran 62% of the time on the coldest day last winter. If that is truly the case he should still have some cushion in there. Honestly with the information on the past boiler I would have zero concern about the size of the boiler even with the piping as it is. We don't even know what the old piping looked like it could have been the same or worse?!

    I don't know where the 62% came from. It sounds to me like the boiler shut down on low water and not because the Tstat was satisfied, otherwise it probably would not have come back on till the next hour (if it was set for 1 cycle per hour) Still too many unknowns. We don't know what the old piping looked like and I'm not concerned about the old piping. I just know that when that boiler is running, in the dead of winter, leaking sweat joints on that copper is not something anyone wants. It's not right and its a brand new install. I think we have an obligation to help this Poster explain to his plumber what he wants/needs. The quality of Near boiler piping is not measured by the quality of the previous piping. It should be, at a minimum, what the I&O manual specifies. That install affects not only performance but warranty as well.
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 12,833
    edited October 2015
    @Fred,

    Old boiler was rated 86,000 output new one is 85,000 output.
    As far as I know the OP said the old one heated the structure fine and even had fairly short run cycles (not short cycling). Working hard isn't a concern, boilers should work hard. Running 100% during the coldest days if not losing temperature slightly is preferred just as air conditioning shouldn't keep up during heat waves, if it does it's considered oversized and does poorly 90% of the time.

    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
    Canucker
  • Fred
    Fred Member Posts: 8,518
    ChrisJ said:

    @Fred,

    Old boiler was rated 86,000 output new one is 85,000 output.
    As far as I know the OP said the old one heated the structure fine and even had fairly short run cycles (not short cycling). Working hard isn't a concern, boilers should work hard. Running 100% during the coldest days if not losing temperature slightly is preferred just as air conditioning shouldn't keep up during heat waves, if it does it's considered oversized and does poorly 90% of the time.

    As I said multiple times in previous posts, time and weather will verify the boiler sizing. It's on the margin (for me) @ 10% pick-up but may work fine. Even Crown advised it may be slightly on the light side but it is what it is. I don't know that any steam boiler should run 100% of the time, even during the coldest weather. If it is running 100% of the time, it is not allowing the system to breath, which one pipe systems need to do.
    Insulation and good piping/venting will help. Most of my comments are dealing with the installation itself and the copper piping, fact that the header appears to be pitched the wrong direction and a bit skimpy. Probably should be a size larger that the riser. Ideally, the installer should have used both boiler tappings but that probably is not a minimum requirement. Certainly would have helped performance.
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 12,833
    Fred said:


    As I said multiple times in previous posts, time and weather will verify the boiler sizing. It's on the margin (for me) @ 10% pick-up but may work fine. Even Crown advised it may be slightly on the light side but it is what it is. I don't know that any steam boiler should run 100% of the time, even during the coldest weather. If it is running 100% of the time, it is not allowing the system to breath, which one pipe systems need to do.
    Insulation and good piping/venting will help. Most of my comments are dealing with the installation itself and the copper piping, fact that the header appears to be pitched the wrong direction and a bit skimpy. Probably should be a size larger that the riser. Ideally, the installer should have used both boiler tappings but that probably is not a minimum requirement. Certainly would have helped performance.

    I get to use this meme again! :)



    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
    Canucker
  • Fred
    Fred Member Posts: 8,518
    Whatever Chris. Let's get back to helping this HO get the best fix he can get while this is a new install. You may want to relook at some of Dan's books regarding "Breathing" Even if you don't buy that, I'd much rather have my system cycle and take advantage of the residual heat coming off of those cast iron radiators, with no fuel consumption during that 30 to 40 minute window between cycles.
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 12,833
    edited October 2015
    Fred said:

    Whatever Chris. Let's get back to helping this HO get the best fix he can get while this is a new install. You may want to relook at some of Dan's books regarding "Breathing" Even if you don't buy that, I'd much rather have my system cycle and take advantage of the residual heat coming off of those cast iron radiators, with no fuel consumption during that 30 to 40 minute window between cycles.

    I don't need to relook at Dan's books.
    He was talking about keeping pressure low so vents can re-open and let remaining air out of the system. Nothing about letting a system shut down to breath.

    No such thing as residual heat. You get out of a radiator (or pipe) 100% of what you put in. If the radiator is dissipating 100% of what a boiler creates and the room wants it the boiler can run all night long.

    Energy cannot be created or destroyed.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
    Hatterasguy
  • BrianT1077
    BrianT1077 Member Posts: 108
    I have to make a correction to the post about the old oil boiler cycling in Feb. I found the screen shots on my phone which are from Jan 7, 2015, even though it ran a lot in Feb also. The first pic is how long it was off, next pic is how long it ran until it turned off again. These times were basically consistent.
    Crown Boiler Bermuda Series model: BSI103, BTU output: 85,000, single pipe steam system