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Combing zones

Hi Forum
Have a new customer with a request. He currently has 3 separate bb zones. They are controlled with an Argo AZ3 control, and 3 Honeywell 'V' series zone valves. He wants to combine zones 1 & 2 to one zone (smaller zones, causing short cycling). I wouldn't think you could wire both t-stats in series, because each t-t terminal on the control is putting out 24v.
a) Is it possible to put both zone valves onto one zone of the controller, i.e. the 1,2,3,4 terminals?
Or is there any other ideas, short of some repiping to solve the request.
Any help or thoughts are always appreciated
steve

Comments

  • Zman
    Zman Member Posts: 6,992
    Steve,
    Haven't seen you post in a while, welcome back.
    I think you have a lot of options with the controller.
    Are you trying to make one t-stat control both valves?
    Either t-stat control 2 valves or do both have to call to open the valves?
    The argo only has one transformer so combining the 24volt from the 2 relays really should not screw anything up. I think this is going to be some jumpers and/or wirenuts on the TT side of things to make it happen.

    Carl
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
    STEVEusaPABobbyBoy
  • STEVEusaPA
    STEVEusaPA Member Posts: 5,315
    edited October 2014
    Hey, Carl, I'm always lurking, sometimes commenting, usually busy (aren't we all). Yeah, just trying to make one t-stat control both zones.
    Thanks for your response.
    steve
  • icesailor
    icesailor Member Posts: 7,265
    edited October 2014
    Personally, I think that some out there have become obsessed with "short cycling". Ships happen. If the two zones are adjoining, why not just set the two thermostats to the same temperature and leave it at that?
    In my last house, I had three zones on the first floor, two were adjoining. One would actually heat the other room given enough time. I set them both for the same temperature with those evil clock thermostats. Setting the most active one higher also worked well. If your intent is to make two into one, the Shade Tree Mechanic in me says to try setting both at the same temperature. Isn't that the same?

    The real problem (IMO) is "SCDS" Short Cycle Derangement Syndrome.

    I would have been quite happy with keeping the Living Room at 65 degrees when I was watching TV and reading in the Living Room. Wearing my Winter Clothes, I was comfortable. If I felt cold, I could just put on mu insulated hooded sweat shirt. My wife informed me that if I wanted to watch TV or read in a room that was 65 degrees, We could set up a TV in the garage with the cars. If SHE was sitting and watching, it was going to be 70 degrees!!!.

    End of that discussion.

    At 9:30 PM it turned down to 58 degrees anyway.
  • Zman
    Zman Member Posts: 6,992
    Ice, even if you set them the same they will never read the same and will compete with each other.
    Perhaps a category on the habits of the fairer sex is needed?

    Steve,
    If you jumper the tt's you can run them both off one t-stat. Just a jumper wire for the left side of the one with the T-stat attached to the left of the other and right to right. It is just like having one light switch controlling multiple lights.

    Carl
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
    RobGBobbyBoy
  • STEVEusaPA
    STEVEusaPA Member Posts: 5,315
    @Carl, I was thinking that. But doesn't each T-T from the control put out 24v?
    @Ice, this was originally one zone branched in 3 directions, with an internal coil for DHW-probably working fine (with an oversized boiler) The HO decided with the help of his plumber, he could 'save money' splitting the zones, removing the coil, and adding an electric water heater.
    He asked me about it before he did it (I take care of his rental properties), didn't take my advice.
    Yes...I told him to give his plumber a call...lol
    steve
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 17,092

    @Carl, I was thinking that. But doesn't each T-T from the control put out 24v?
    @Ice, this was originally one zone branched in 3 directions, with an internal coil for DHW-probably working fine (with an oversized boiler) The HO decided with the help of his plumber, he could 'save money' splitting the zones, removing the coil, and adding an electric water heater.
    He asked me about it before he did it (I take care of his rental properties), didn't take my advice.
    Yes...I told him to give his plumber a call...lol

    Got to love it. Telling him to call his plumber is a good idea...

    But no. A thermostat is simply a switch -- on or off. Granted, there are some fancy controls in some of them, but the whole idea is it's either on or it's off. Therefore, if you want either thermostat to be able to fire up both zones, wire them in parallel (and the zones in parallel). If you want both thermostats to be calling before the system runs, then wire them in series. If they are the fancier sort which also has a common 24 volt feed for some reason, keep that. Should work... but I'd like to look at it before I guaranteed anything, and I can't do that, so -- take what I write with a grain of salt!
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England